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Full text of "Mary Washington College Bulletin. Admissions Catalog, July, 1980"

Mary Washington College 



Academic Catalog 



Bulletin 1980-82 




Mary Washington College Bulletin. Admis- 
sions Catalog Issue, USPS #072-680, 
Volume 10, No. 4, July 1980. Published 
quarterly by Mary Washington College, 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401. Second 
class postage paid at Fredericksburg. 

Mary Washington College does not dis- 
criminate in recruiting, admitting, or 
enrolling students on the basis of race, 
color, religion, physical disability, national 
origin, political affiliation, marital status, 
sex, or age. Questions should be directed 
to the Executive Vice President and 
AAEEO Officer, Mary Washington 
College, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401. 

The provisions of this Catalog are not to 
be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the College. The 
College reserves the right to change any 
provisions or requirements at any time. 



Mary Washington College is accredited 
by the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools. 

The College is a member of: 

The Association of Graduate Liberal 

Studies Programs 
The Southern University Conference 
The American Council on Education 
The Association of State Colleges and 

Universities 
The Association of Virginia Colleges 
The College Entrance Examination Board 
The National Association of Schools of 

Music 

Honorary academic organizations wittr 
chapters on campus include: 
Phi Beta Kappa (academic achievement) 
Mortarboard (leadership, scholarship and 

service) 
Chi Beta Phi (achievement in the sciences) 

Women graduates are eligible for member- 
ship in the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women 



For answers to questions about Mary 
Washington College, to apply for admis- 
sion, or to arrange interviews and tours, 
please contact: 

H. Conrad War lick 

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Mary Washington College 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 

703/899-1681 



Contents 

3 The College 


13 Policies and Procedures 
17 Services and Activities 




5 Degrees and Awards 


19 Admission 






5 Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science 


24 Fees and Assistance 








6 Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 






7 Bachelor of Liberal Studies 


32 Courses of Study 




8 Master of Arts in Liberal Studies 


69 Campus Map 




8 Awards for Student Achievement 






9 Award for Faculty Achievement 


70 Directory 
78 Index 




10 Departments and Programs 


79 Calendar 




10 Academic Departments and Programs 






10 Anthropology, Geography and Sociology 






10 Art 






10 Biological Sciences 






10 Chemistry and Geology 






10 Classics, Philosophy and Religion 






10 Dramatic Arts and Dance 






10 Economics, Business and Public Affairs 






10 Education 






11 English, Linguistics, and Speech 






11 Health and Physical Education 






11 History and American Studies 






11 Mathematical Sciences and Physics 






11 Modern Foreign Languages 




t/ 


11 Music 






11 Psychology 






11 Special Programs 






11 Special Majors 






11 Internships 






12 Junior Year Abroad 






12 Health Sciences 






12 Pre-Medical 






12 Pre-Law 






12 Teacher Certification 







The College 



Mary Washington 
College - 
named for the 
mother of the 
father of our 
country — is a link to our 
country's beginning and a step- 
ping stone to its future. 

Located on the site of one of the 
major Civil War battles, Mary 
Washington College is a study in 
contrast. Steeped in history, the 
College is preparing young men 
and women for their roles in the 
21st century. At Mary Wash- 
ington College you will find 
up-to-date instruction in com- 
puter science, nuclear physics and 
atomic chemistry. 

At the same time, you can step 
back two hundred years to the 
days of America's founding 
fathers when you stroll through 
nearby Kenmore — home of 
George Washington's sister — or 
browse in the James Monroe 
Museum and Memorial Library, 
a shrine administered by the 
College. 

But Mary Washington College is 
much, much more. Mary Wash- 
ington is the only small, public, 
residential, coeducational, liberal 
arts college in Virginia. 



Small, Public. Small, we think, is 
more a feeling than a number. 
Mary Washington has 2,480 
students and a faculty of 140. 
That's large enough to support a 
healthy diversity of backgrounds 
and interests, and to maintain 
strength in the academic pro- 
gram. It is not large enough to 
encourage impersonality. At 
Mary Washington we think 
quality is equal to excellent 
teaching, plus small classes, plus 
personal attention. This simple 
formula, which describes our 
overall philosophy, has made 
Mary Washington the choice for 
many students who are looking at 
advantages often associated with 
private institutions. 

Residential. Mary Washington 
has 17 residence halls that vary 
in capacity from 20 to 195. All 
offer the recreational and living 
amenities you would expect at a 
good, small college. There is 
everything on campus from an 
indoor swimming pool to a 31- 
bed infirmary. (See page 18 and 
the Student Handbook for more 
details). 



Informal social life centers 
around Ann Carter Lee Hall. The 
College Shop, a place to eat and 
socialize with friends; large and 
small student lounges, the book- 
store and the bank are found 
here. There are at least two 
formal dances on campus each 
year. Otherwise, it's mixers, 
parties, movies, rock, disco, and 
bluegrass. There are no social 
fraternities or sororities. 

The College sponsors an annual 
concert series with visits from 
dance companies and theater 
groups. The Department of 
Dramatic Arts and Dance gives 
four plays and a series ol labora- 
tory productions each year, and 
the Dance Company performs 
once each semester. The College 
Chorus, the College-Com- 
munity Symphony Orchestra and 
other musical groups give con- 
certs and recitals. 

The Student Handbook covers 
most aspects of life at Mary 
Washington and is published by 
the Office of the Dean of 
Students. 



Coeducational. In 1970 Mary 
Washington began accepting 
male students. During the 1979- 
80 academic year, there were 
about 480 men on campus. There 
are upperclass, coeducational 
residence halls housing men on 
the lower floors and women on 
the upper floors. Freshmen resi- 
dence halls are all-male and all- 
female. 

Liberal Arts. Students at Mary 
Washington receive a broad 
education in the liberal arts, 
complemented by intense study 
in a particular field. The College 
provides a program of academic 
and career counseling, beginning 
in the summer prior to the first 
semester of the freshman year. 
Also, each department has a 
faculty counselor on careers. An 
academic internship program 
offers opportunities to earn 
academic credit for off-campus 
work. Adults, who wish to begin 
a college education or to con- 
tinue interrupted studies, can 
enroll in the Bachelor of Liberal 
Studies Program and proceed at 
their own rate toward gradua- 
tion. A program leading to a 
Master of Arts in Liberal Studies 
was established in the fall of 1980. 



Because students are admitted to 
Mary Washington with the 
understanding that they are 
academically able and personally 
mature, the College offers them 
both freedom and responsibility. 
Students have much leeway in 
choosing their programs at Mary 
Washington, but all are demand- 
ing; even the best prepared 
student is likely to find the 
freshman year academically diffi- 
cult. There are no "cut rules" 
or enforced study hours. But 
there is help. 

The Mary Washington College 
faculty is a teaching faculty. Full 
professors teach at all levels. 
They are available for supervi- 
sion of individual study, for 
advising, and for informal con- 
sultation. Most classes have 
fewer than 25 students. A few 
courses have as many as 60, but 
these students also meet in small 
labs or discussion groups. 



In Virginia. The 275-acre campus 
stands on Marye's Heights, the 
site of the Civil War Battle of 
Fredericksburg. The town, lo- 
cated on the fall line of the 
Rappahannock River, was the 
boyhood home of George Wash- 
ington, and a favorite meeting 
place of the founding fathers. 

Today, Fredericksburg is near the 
center of the east coast mega- 
lopolis, halfway between Rich- 
mond and Washington, D.C. 
There are three major airports 
within fifty miles (National, 
Dulles, and Richmond). Hourly 
limousine service is available 
throughout the day to both 
National and Richmond airports. 
Trailways and Greyhound buses 
stop almost every hour at the 
Fredericksburg station, two 
blocks from campus. Interstate 95 
is the major north-south route. 

Ringed with shopping centers, 
the town retains much of its early 
charm, and offers an easy, 
gracious life style. The campus 
is within walking distance of 
downtown, allowing students to 
shop and participate in com- 
munity activities. 



Degrees and Awards 



Mary Washington 
College awards 
five degrees — 
Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Bachelor of Science 
in Medical Technology, Bachelor 
of Liberal Studies and Master of 
Liberal Studies. The require- 
ments for each degree are out- 
lined below. 

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Bachelor of 
Science in Medical 
Technology 

General Requirements 

Degree requirements in these programs 
are stated in terms of attaining certain 
goals, not in terms of specific courses. 
Thus, to meet basic college require- 
ments, the student investigates four 
broad areas of the liberal curriculum: 
literature, humanities, social science, 
and natural science and mathematics. 
Students specialize by taking eight to 12 
courses in one subject area, which 
constitute a major program. 

Although students are required to major 
in an academic discipline, they may 
also work toward a specific career or 
professional goal. Both major programs 
and career opportunities are outlined in 
the following sections. 



Basic requirements and the major 
account for about half ot the four-year 
course of study. Though students decide 
individually how best to fulfill the other 
half of their undergraduate curriculum, 
the College encourages a rich and 
diverse total program. Some options 
open to the student are individual study, 
student-designed special majors, pass/ 
fail courses, internships and double 
majors. 

Making decisions is an integral part 
of the educational process at Mary 
Washington. While faculty members 
help students select courses and major 
fields of study, the final decisions are the 
student's own. 

Students are responsible for assuring 
that they fulfill all degree require- 
ments. 

I. B.A./B.S. Regular Program 

Degree Specifics. The specific degree is 
determined by the choice of major 
program. Both degrees require 122 
semester credit hours, distributed in five 
categories: basic requirements, diversi- 
fication, major program, electives, and 
physical education. No course may be 
scored in more than one category, and 
all students must demonstrate compe- 
tence in English composition and in a 
foreign language. A quality-point aver- 
age of 2.00 on all Mary Washington 
College course work is also a degree 
requirement. 

No course may be taken tor credit 
which is prerequisite or introductory to 
a course already passed successfully. 



A. Basic Requirements. Courses total- 
ing at least six credits are required in 
each of the following areas: 

Literature (Lj — literature courses in 
classics, English, modern foreign 
languages 

Humanities (H) — appropriate courses in 
American studies, art, classics, dance, 
dramatic arts, music, philosophy, reli- 
gion, speech 

Social Science (S) — appropriate courses 
in American studies, anthropology, 
economics, foreign language, geog- 
raphy, history, political science, psy- 
chology, sociology 

Natural Science and Mathematics (NM) — 
appropriate courses in astronomy, 
biology, chemistry, computer science, 
geology, mathematics, physics, statistics 

Courses which may be taken to satisfy 
the basic requirements are identified in 
the course listing by letters (L), (H), (S), 
or (N/M). These symbols refer to the 
area divisions explained above. The 
content of the course, rather than the 
department in which it is taught, 
determines its placement in one ot the 
tour area divisions. 

B. Major Program. Up to one-third (a 
maximum ot 40 credits) ot the degree 
program may be required in the major 
program. At least three-quarters of the 
major program must be fulfilled bv 
courses taken at Mary Washington 
College; a quality-point average of 2.00 
on these courses is required. See the 
Academic Departments and Programs 
section tor information on the various 
regular, interdisciplinary, cooperative 
and special majors ottered by the 
College. 



C. Electives. Additional courses must 
be taken to complete a total ot 120 
semester hours credit, exclusive ot the 
required one year (two credits) in 
physical education. 

D. Physical Education. Each student is 
required to take two credits ot physical 
education or studio dance. Students who 
have been in military service may 
receive up to two credits in physical 
education, with one credit given tor one 
year in the service. 

E. Demonstration of Competence. Eng- 
lish Composition. Each student must 
demonstrate competence in English 
composition. This is usually accomp- 
lished by the successful completion ot 
English 101. Writing Workshop, but 
also may be satisfied by certification 
from the English Department. 

Foreign language. Each student must 
demonstrate competence equivalent to 
the completion ot the intermediate level 
college course in a toreign language. 
modern or ancient. Students who do not 
have tour high school units through the 
fourth-year level of one language will 
be required to complete the interme- 
diate course and its prerequisites, unless 
excused by the faculty in the language 
ottered. 

F. Diversification. At least one-third 
(40 credits) of the courses required tor 
sraduation must be taken in a subject or 
subjects other than the major subject. 
These are in addition to courses taken 
tor basic requirements. Degree pro- 
grams based on the minimum ot 122 
hours can have no more than 45 per cent 
(55 credits) of the total degree program 
in the same subject, unless they have 
been approved as an Alternate Degree 
Program for greater concentration (see 
below). Students in interdepartmental 
majors may use any course for diversifi- 
cation. 



G. Residence Requirement. A student 
must earn at least 30 academic credits at 
Man.' Washington to be considered a 
degree candidate. These 30 credits must 
include at least three-tourths of the 
major program, unless the student is 
spending the junior year abroad in an 
approved language program. 

Students must spend the last session 
regular semester or summer session) of 
their degree programs on campus. This 
rule does not apply to students in the 
two cooperative programs. Medical 
Technology and Speech Pathology and 
Audiology, in which the fourth year is 
spent at a cooperating institution. 

II. B.A./B.S. Alternate Degree 
Program 

Students with exceptional backgrounds 
and special interests may apply tor the 
Alternate Degree Program, which 
allows greater concentration than the 
regular degree program. In an alternate 
degree program, up to one-half of the 
total program may be taken in a major 
subject; up to three-quarters ot the 
total program may be taken in a single 
area, as defined under basic require- 
ments, but at least one quarter of the 
total program must be taken in an area 
other than that which includes the 
major subject. Students interested in the 
alternate degree program should apply 
before the beginning ot the junior year 
to the Committee on Special Degree 
Programs. 

III. B.S. in Medical 
Technology 

Under the cooperative Program in 
Medical Technology, the student com- 
pletes three years ^92 credit hours) ot 
undergraduate course work at Mary 
Washington College, tollowed by 12 
months of clinical training at Fairtax 
Hospital, Roanoke Memorial Hospitals, 
or the University ot Virginia Hospital. 



Admission to the final 12-month hos- 
pital training program is competitive. 
Students must meet the admission 
requirements of the hospital to which 
they apply and should make application 
during the third year at Mary Washing- 
ton. Upon successful completion of 
clinical work, students are qualified to 
take the National Registry Examination 
given by the American Society of 
Clinical Pathologists. 

Students must fulfill the Man. - Washing- 
ton College basic and competency 
requirements outlined above [l). Other 
specific requirements and listing of 
courses for the clinical year are de- 
scribed in a separate brochure available 
in the Advising Otfice. 

If students enrolled in the medical 
technology program change their inter- 
est, they may continue with the regular 
degree program at Man." Washington. 



Bachelor of Liberal 
Studies 

In addition to the Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science degrees, the Col- 
lege offers the Bachelor of Liberal 
Studies degree for men and women 24 
years of age and older who have a 
strong desire to consummate their 
learning in a baccalaureate degree. 
Learning acquired through life and 
work may be converted to college 
credit, and credit previously earned in 
other institutions may also apply toward 
this degree. 

The candidate for the Bachelor of 
Liberal Studies degree works closely 
with a faculty mentor, and an individual 
program is designed which incorporates 
the student's past experience and 
present goals. These students proceed at 
their own pace toward completion ot 
the program. 

Degree Specifics. The Bachelor of 
Liberal Studies degree requires 120 
semester credit hours, distributed in 
three categories: general education, 
electives, and core area. No course may 
be scored in more than one category. 
The student must demonstrate compe- 
tence in English and earn at least 30 
credits in graded classroom courses. At 
least 30 credits must be taken under the 
auspices of Mary Washington College 
after admission to the program. A 
quality-point average of 2.00 on all 
Mary Washington College course work 
is also required. Some students are 
required to complete BLST 0100, 
Orientation Seminar (one credit), an 
introduction to study skills. Others 
may wish to enroll in BLST 0101, 
Portfolio Development (one credit), for 
assistance in developing portfolios that 
document learning gained through life 
and work tor the possible conversion to 
academic credit. 



General Education. Courses totaling at 
least six credits are required in each of 
the following areas: 

Humanities — art history, classics, 
drama, film and photography, litera- 
ture, music, religion, philosophy 

Social Science — economics, geography, 
history, political science, psychology, 
sociology 

Natural Science and Mathematics — astron- 
omy, biology, chemistry, geology, 
mathematics, physics 

Communication Arts — computer lan- 
guage, creative writing, foreign lan- 
guage, performing arts, speech, studio 

art 

Electives. A maximum of 56 credits may 
be taken in electives. 

Competence in English Composition. Each 
student must demonstrate competence 
in English Composition. This may be 
accomplished by completing English 
101, Writing Workshop, or by certifica- 
tion from the English Department. 

Classroom Experience. At least 30 
credits must be earned by direct 
classroom experience at Mary Wash- 
ington or at another institution. 

Residence Credit or Equivalent. Thirty 
semester hours must be completed after 
admission to the Bachelor of Liberal 
Studies Program at Mary Washington, 
or in a program supervised or approved 
by the College at another institution. 

Core Area. At least 40 credits must be 
taken in a core area, which consists of a 
coherent group of subjects organized in 
such a way as to create a specialty or 
concentration. A regular liberal arts 
major offered by the College may be 
used, or an interdisciplinary selection 
may be made from the offerings of 



several departments. A quality-point 
average of 2.00 on courses counted in 
this area is required for the degree. 

Servicemen's Opportunities Program. 

Mary Washington College is a member 
of the Servicemen's Opportunity Col- 
lege (SOC) network, a group of more 
than 300 colleges and universities 
committed to making post-secondary 
education more readily available to 
mobile military personnel through 
cooperation on admission, transfer of 
credits, and residency requirements. 
The SOC program makes it easier for 
service personnel to transfer college 
credits between MWC and other 
participating institutions, and to earn 
their degrees at the College. (Mary 
Washington's degree requirements 
specify that the student must complete 
122 credit hours ot college work, yet 
only 30 of those hours must be taken as 
"resident credit" — in courses taught 
by MWC faculty members, mostly in 
the student's major field.) More specific 
information about the SOC program 
may be obtained from the Office of the 
Dean. 



Senior Citizens 

Provided space in classes is available, 
legal residents of Virginia 60 years of 
age or older may take courses at 
reduced or waivered tees according to 
the stipulations detailed on page 25. 

Senior citizens should request informa- 
tion about application procedures from 
the Vice President tor Continuing 
Education. 



Master of Arts 
in Liberal Studies 

Beginning with the fall semester, 1980- 
81, the College will offer for the first 
time, a degree on the Master's level. 
The first program is a Master of Arts in 
Liberal Studies, to be followed in 1982 
by a Master o( Business Administration 
and in 1983 a Master of Public Adminis- 
tration. The Masters programs are 
designed for adult commuting students 
who wish to complete a degree while 
working, or for those students who wish 
to complete a degree for vocational or 
avocational interests. Courses will be 
offered in the evenings, on weekends 
and in the summer. 

Degree Specifics. The Master of Arts in 
Liberal Studies requires 30 semester 
credit hours on the graduate level, 
distributed in four categories: initial 
courses, colloquia, electives, and di- 
rected study. All students take Ideas and 
Movements of the Western World (I 
and II), 6 semester credit hours, a team- 
taught interdisciplinary course survey- 
ing major trends in thought, the arts, 
history and social theory from Greece 
and Rome to the present. Transdiscipli- 
nary colloquia, taught by three graduate 
faculty members, provide a choice for 
another 6 semester credit hours. Fifteen 
semester credit hours form the student's 
elective courses chosen from a variety 
ot graduate courses in specific disci- 
plines and areas. Three semester credit 
hours of directed study complete the 
program. 



Admission and Transfer Credit. Any 

student holding a Bachelor's degree 
from an accredited institution with a B 
average in the last two years of work 
may apply. A student with a lower 
average may apply for conditional status 
and, if accepted, may take the initial 
courses. Such a student, receiving B in 
both these courses, may apply for 
regular status and may use these six 
hours as part of the degree require- 
ments. 

All candidates for admission will be 
interviewed by the Director of 
Graduate Studies. 

Students with graduate course credit 
elsewhere may apply 6 hours of such 
course work (grade of B or higher) to 
the elective portion of this program. Up 
to 6 additional hours may be applied 
to elective credit if such courses were 
taken in a similar program having 
parallel requirements. All transfer hours 
must be approved by the Director and 
the Graduate Council. 

Application and Fees. Application forms 
are available from the Director of 
Graduate Studies, George Washington 
Hall. Fees include: 



Application fee 

Credit hour fees: 
Virginia residents 
Non-Virginia residents 

Yearly registration fee 
(non-degree seeking students) 

Graduation fee 



$25 



$33 
$60 

$15 



$25 



Recognition of Student 
Achievement 

The Dean's List. A student carrying at 
least 12 hours of new work on which 
quality points may be computed at the 
close of a grading period who attains a 
grade-point average of 3.50 or better 
on all work taken for graded credit for 
any semester is placed on the Dean's List 
o( Honor Students. Decisions on the 
Dean's List are based on a student's 
record as it stands at the official close of 
the semester grading period. Thus, 
incompletes always prevent considera- 
tion for the Dean's List. 

Intermediate Honors. A student at Mary 
Washington College who, as a freshman 
and sophomore, achieves a 3.75 quality- 
point average is awarded Intermediate 
Honors. To be eligible for Intermediate 
Honors, a student must have completed 
at least 58 hours, of which at least 44 
must be work on which quality points 
can be computed. 

Distinction Awards. General academic 
attainment ot graduating seniors will be 
recognized through the awards of 
Distinction, High Distinction, and 
Highest Distinction, based solely on the 
student's academic average at Mary 
Washington College. The level of 
attainment for each award is as follows: 
Distinction, 3.25; High Distinction, 
3.50; Highest Distinction, 3.75. A 
student may receive both departmental 
honors and one of the distinction 
awards. 

To be graduated with Distinction, High 
Distinction or Highest Distinction, a 
student must have earned at least 94 
hours on which quality points may be 
computed. 



Mary Washington College Alumni 
Award. This award is presented annu- 
ally by the Alumni Association at the 
Senior Convocation to that member of 
the graduating class who has shown 
distinction in academic achievement and 
outstanding service to the College. 

Colgate W. Darden, Jr. Award. This 
award was established in 1960 to honor 
Colgate W. Darden, Jr. President of the 
University of Virginia from 1947 to 
1959. It consists of a medal designed by 
Gaetano Cecere, formerly of the 
Department of Art, and a cash sum. It is 
awarded to the senior having the highest 
academic average. 

To be eligible for the Darden Award, a 
student must have earned at least 94 
hours on which quality points may be 
computed. 

Richard S. Cross Grants for Under- 
graduate Research. Established by the 
late Richard S. Cross, a member of the 
College's first Board of Visitors, and 
supported by the generosity of his 
family, these grants are available to 
support student research projects which 
have been approved for academic credit 
by the departments and by the approp- 
riate College committee. Further infor- 
mation may be obtained from the Office 
of the Dean. 

The Grellet C. Simpson International 
Scholarship (for study abroad). Given by 
the Alumni Association in honor of the 
retirement of College President Grellet 
C. Simpson, this award carries a stipend 
of a maximum of $3,000 tor up to a 
year's study abroad. Interested students 
who have completed 36 credit hours at 
Mary Washington College should 
submit a proposed program of study and 
budget to the Dean of the College. 



Ann Elizabeth Collins Memorial Art 
Award. Established in memory of Ann 
Elizabeth Collins '73, by friends, 
relatives, and faculty, this award is 
given annually to the student who has 
the greatest potential for pen and ink 
drawings and graphics. The recipient is 
selected by members of the Department 
of Art, and the award is presented at the 
Student Art Show or another approp- 
riate recognition event. 

Ann Elizabeth Fitschen Memorial Politi- 
cal Science Award. Established by gifts 
from family, friends, and classmates of 
Ann Elizabeth Fitschen '75, a cash 
award is made annually to the senior 
majoring in Political Science with the 
best academic average, as determined 
by the faculty of the Department of 
Economics, Business and Public Affairs. 
An additional sum is presented annually 
to the Department, on behalf of the 
recipient, to be spent at the discretion of 
the Chairman. 

Aurelia B. Walford Scholarships in 
Music. Established by the will of the late 
Aurelia B. Walford, these scholarships 
are awarded annually to music majors 
on the basis of academic merit and 
performance skills. 

J. Binford Walford Scholarships in 
Architecture. Established by the will of 
the late Aurelia B. Walford, these 
scholarships are awarded annually to 
majors in art history, historic preserva- 
tion or history who have stated career 
goals in architecture-related endeavors. 



Recognition of Faculty 
Achievement 

Grellet C. Simpson Award. This award, 
made possible by an anonymous donor, 
is presented each year at graduation to a 
faculty member in recognition of 
excellence in undergraduate teaching. 

Previous recipients of this award are: 

1972 Carmen L. Rivera 

Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

1973 Sidney H. Mitchell 
Professor of English 

1974 Anna S. Hoye 
Professor of Biology 

1975 Earl G. Insley 
Professor of Chemistry 

1976 Donald E. Glover 
Professor of English 

1977 Glen R. Thomas 
Professor of American Studies 

1978 Nancy H. Mitchell 
Professor of English 

1979 Elizabeth A. Clark 
Professor of Religion 



Departments and Programs 



Mary Washington 
College, through 
its fifteen aca- 
demic depart- 
ments, offers a 
variety of academic majors and 
other programs. There are 25 
disciplinary majors, seven inter- 
disciplinary and two cooperative 
majors. Some departments also 
offer special programs within the 
major, e.g., astronomy within 
the physics major, cartography 
within the geography major and 
communications within the 
English program. 

Other special programs are on a 
college-wide basis, such as, 
Special Majors, Internships, Jun- 
ior Year Abroad, Health Scien- 
ces, Pre-Law, Pre-Medical and 
Teacher Certification. 

Academic Departments and 
their Programs 

N.B. An asterisk indicates that a major 
is offered in that program. 

Department of Anthropology, 
Geography and Sociology 

Professor Carter, Chairperson; Profes- 
sors Bowen, Emory, Sletten (Career 
Adviser for Sociology); Associate Pro- 
fessor Gouger (Career Adviser for 
Geography); Assistant Professors Lon- 
don, Olson, Palmieri, Williamson 
(Career Adviser for Anthropology). 

Anthropology — p. 33 

'Geography (B.A.) — p. 48 
'Sociology (B.A.) — p. 65 



Department of Art 

Associate Professor Meyer, 
Chairperson; Professors Muick, Oliver; 
Associate Professors Hara, Lamph; 
Assistant Professors DiBella (Career 
Adviser for Studio Art), Dreiss (Career 
Adviser for Art History), Pendleton. 

'Art History (B.A.) — p. 33 
"Studio Art (B.A.) — p. 34 

Department of Biological Sciences 

Associate Professor Fuller, Chairperson; 
Professors Friedman, R. M. Johnson 
(Career Adviser for Biology), T. L. 
Johnson, Parris, W. C. Pinschmidt, Jr.; 
Associate Professors Bass (Career 
Adviser for Environmental Earth Sci- 
ences), M. W. Pinschmidt; Assistant 
Professor Southworth (Career Adviser 
for Medical Technology); Adjunct Pro- 
fessor Cornman. 

'Biology (B.S.) - p. 35 
'Environmental Earth Sciences 

(Interdisciplinary) (B.S.) — p. 47 
'Medical Technology (Cooperative Program) 
(B.S. in Med. Tech.) — p. 55 

Department of Chemistry and Geology . 

Professor Mahoney, Chairperson (Ca- 
reer Adviser for Chemistry); Professors 
Cover, Crissman, Wishner; Associate 
Professors George, Gratz; Instructor 
Dagenhart (Career Adviser for Geol- 
ogy)- 

'Chemistry (B.S.) — p. 38 
'Geology (B.S.) — p. 49 

Department of Classics, 
Philosophy and Religion 

Professor Clark, Chairperson (Career 
Adviser for Religion); Professors Burns, 
Van Sant (Career Adviser for Philoso- 
phy); Associate Professors Cain, Hatch 
(Career Adviser for Classics); Assistant 
Professor Fraser; Instructors Baley, 
Winn. 



'Classics: Classical Civilization 
Concentration (B.A.) — p. 39 
'Classics: Latin Concentration (B.A.) — 

p. 54 

Greek — p. 50 

Latin — p. 54 
'Philosophy (B.A.) — p. 58 
'Religion (B.A.) — p. 64 

Department of Dramatic Arts and Dance 

Professor Kenvin, Chairperson; Asso- 
ciate Professor Haydar; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Gray, Joyce (Career Adviser for 
Dramatic Arts); Instructor Graham 
(Career Adviser for Dance). 

'Dance (B.A.) — p. 40 
'Drama (B.A.) — p. 41 
'Performing Arts (B.A.) — p. 58 

Department of Economics, 
Business and Public Affairs 

Associate Professor Czarsty, Chairper- 
son (Career Adviser for Business); 
Professors L. P. Fickett (Career Adviser 
for Public Administration), Krickus 
(Career Adviser for Political Science); 
Associate Professors Fingerhut, Kramer 
(Career Adviser for International 
Affairs); Assistant Professors Herrick, 
Lohrke, Rycroft (Career Adviser for 
Economics); Lecturers Morley, Tucker. 

'Business Administration (B.S.) — p. 37 
'Economics (B.A.) — p. 42 
'International Affairs (Interdisciplinary) 

(B.A.) — p. 53 
'Political Science (B.A.) — p. 61 
'Public Administration (B.S.) — p. 63 

Department of Education 

Professor Slayton, Chairperson (Career 
Adviser); Professors Merchent, War- 
lick; Associate Professors Holmes, 
Zisman; Assistant Profes>ors Vawter, 
Vogel; Instructors Gill, J. Johnson. 

Education — p. 43 

Teacher Certification — p .43 



11 


Department of English, 
Linguistics, and Speech 

Associate Professor Kemp, Chairperson; 
Professors Brown, Fleming, Glover, 
Hanna, N. H. Mitchell, S. H. Mitchell 
(Career Adviser for English), Singh; 
Associate Professors Dervin, Duke 
(Career Adviser for Speech), Hansen, 
Lutterbie; Assistant Professor Collins 
(Career Adviser for Linguistics). 

'English: Literature Concentration (B.A.) — 

p. 44 
*English: Writing Concentration (B.A.) — 

p. 45 
Linguistics — p. 54 
Speech — p. 68 
Speech Pathology and Audiology 

(Cooperative Program) (B.A.) — p. 68 


Department of Mathematical Sciences 
and Physics 

Professor Lindsey, Chairperson (Career 
Adviser for Mathematics); Professors 
Atalay (Career Adviser for Physics), 
Nikolic; Associate Professors Acker- 
man, Harris, Pierce, Zeleznock; Assist- 
ant Professors Conroy (Career Adviser 
for Mathematics), Lutz, Tupitsyn. 

'Computer and Information Science 

(B.S.) - p. 39 
'Mathematics (B.S.) - p. 54 
'Physics (B.S.) — p. 60 
Statistics — p. 68 


Department of Psychology 

Professor MacEwen, Chairperson; Pro- 
fessors Kelly, Rabson (Career Adviser), 
Weinstock; Associate Professors Bill, 
Smith; Assistant Professors Moeller 
(Career Adviser), Nissim-Sabat, Pu- 
hakka. 

'Psychology (B.A) — p. 62 
'Psychology (BS.) - p 62 


Special Programs 

Special Majors 

The student and the faculty adviser 
work out an individual program bv 


Department of Modern Foreign 
Languages 

Professor Stephenson, Chairperson (Ca- 
reer Adviser for Spanish); Professors 
Ascari, Blessing (Career Adviser for 
French), Bozicevic (Career Adviser for 
Russian), Hofmann, Hoge; Associate 
Professors Herman, Manolis, Merrill 
(Career Adviser for German); Assistant 
Professors Pena, Niebuhr, Quann. 

'French (B.A.) — p. 47 
'German (B.A.) — p. 50 

Italian — p. 53 

Literatures in Translation — p. 56 

Russian — p. 65 
'Russian Studies (Interdisciplinary) (B.A.) — 

p. 65 
'Spanish (B.A.) - p. 67 


utilizing courses from two or more 
departments which define a field or 
concentration. This major must be 
approved by the Committee on Special 
Degree Programs during the final 
semester of the student's sophomore 
year. Current Special Majors include 
general liberal arts and science pro- 
grams in Medieval Studies, Linguistics, 
Classical and General Archaeology, 
Ethnology, Italian Studies, Asian Stud- 
ies, Ibero-Amencan Studies, Urban 
Affairs, and Written Communication. 


Department of Health 
and Physical Education 

Associate Professor Hegmann, Chair- 
person; Associate Professors Clement, 
Droste, Greenberg, Woosley; Assistant 
Professors Davies, Gallahan, Gordon, 
Kintzing; Riding Mistress Riedl. 

Health - p. 51 

Physical Education — p. 59 


Department of History 
and American Studies 

Associate Professor Crawley, Chairper- 
son; Professors Bourdon, Thomas (Ca- 
reer Adviser for American Studies), 
Vance, Zimdars; Associate Professors 
Campbell, Ryang, Tracy, Warner 
(Career Adviser for History); Assistant 
Professor Blakemore; Instructor Spiess 
(Career Adviser for Historic Preserva- 
tion). 

*American Studies (Interdisciplinary) 

(B.A.) — p. 32 
"Historic Preservation (Interdisciplinary) 

(B.A.) - p. 51 
•History (B.A.) - p. 51 


Academic Internships 

The College offers a program ot 
academic internships in which qualified 
juniors and seniors work in ort-campus 
positions. Cooperating academic de- 
partments supervise the interns and 
award academic credit tor the learning 
experience. 

Recent placements include research 
with the Federal Reserve Bank and the 
National Archives, work as an auditor 
with Best Products, preparation ot 
geologic maps tor the National Geo- 
logic Survey, comprehensive exposure 
to banking at the National Bank ot 
Fredericksburg, and political research 
tor the syndicated columnists Evans and 
Novak. 


Department of Music 

Professor Baker, Chairperson; Professor 
Lemoine; Assistant Professors Bailey, 
Long, Norwood (Career Adviser); 
Instructors Chalifoux-Goddin, M. Fick- 
ett, Haas, Randall, Reinburg, White. 

'Music (B.A) — p. 56 



12 



A survey of recent graduates indicated 
that 559c or them felt their internship 
had been an important factor in securing 
their first position. 

Junior Year Abroad 

The procedure for earning credits at 

colleges and universities abroad is 

basically the same as earning credits at 

other institutions in the United States, 

except that more advance planning is 

necessary. 

With the help ot departmental tacultv 
and the Advising Office, interested 
students should investigate the wide 
range of available programs. Most 
students spend the year abroad with a 
program sponsored by an American 
institution, although a few apply 
directly to the foreign school. All 
courses must be approved in advance 
for transfer credit. Courses to be 
counted in the major program must also 
be approved by the student's major 
adviser who helps the student structure 
a program in relation to the major at 
Mary Washington. 

Health Sciences 

The Health Sciences constitute a variety 
of paramedical professions that encom- 
pass the general field of health care. The 
basic liberal arts and science courses 
offered at Mary Washington provide 
the initial preparation for entrance 
to nursing, physical therapy, dental 
hygiene, pharmacy, medical tech- 
nology, and veterinary science profes- 
sional schools. 

During their freshman year at Mars- 
Washington students must give careful 
attention to the admission requirements 
of professional schools. A career adviser 
is available to help students select 
courses which meet these admission 
requirements and prepare them tor the 
professional qualification examinations 
in their field. Admission to professional 



institutions is, of course, very competi- 
tive and depends on academic perform- 
ance, personal interview, and scores on 
the qualifying examination. 

Students interested in medical tech- 
nology earn a Bachelor of Science in 
Medical Technology degree by taking 
their first three years at the College and 
the fourth year at a cooperating 
institution. Individual programs of study 
at the College are determined by the 
students and the program adviser with 
regard for the prerequisites named by 
the cooperating institution. (See Medical 
Technology) 

The major program in speech pathology 
and audiology is offered in cooperation 
with the University of Virginia. Stu- 
dents complete their first three years at 
the College and spend their fourth year 
in residence at the University of 
Virginia, earning a Bachelor ot Arts 
degree from Man' Washington College. 
Full details on this program are avail- 
able from the Speech Career Adviser. 
(See Speech Pathology and Audiology) 

Pre-Medical 

Students interested in a career in 
medicine or dentistry may concentrate 
their studies in any major field. In 
general, medical and dental schools are 
primarily interested in students who 
have made a dedicated commitment to a 
major field and have demonstrated a 
superior performance within it as well 
as in their general academic program. 

The Pre-Medical Advisory Committee 
at the College assists pre-medical 
students by collecting biographical data 
and faculty recommendations, by coun- 
seling for the medical college admissions 
test (MCAT), arranging an interview 
with the committee, and finally in the 
senior year prepares an integral, institu- 
tional recommendation that is sent to 
the medical school. Since admission to 
medical school is highly competitive, it 



is advantageous for pre-medical stu- 
dents to have a second major interest to 
fall back on in case their admission to 
medical school is unsuccessful. For 
example, there are excellent postgradu- 
ate opportunities for biology and 
chemistry majors to pursue careers in 
medically oriented fields such as bio- 
chemistry, clinical chemistry, medical 
technology, pharmacology, medicinal 
chemistry, and forensic science to 
mention a few. 

Pre-Law 

This program provides guidelines for 
students interested in entering law 
school. There is no standard pre-law 
curriculum at the College. The Program 
Adviser assists students in selecting 
courses which meet their individual 
needs and provide the foundation for 
acquiring skills necessary to the legal 
profession. The career pattern includes 
courses in written and oral communica- 
tion, and courses which help develop the 
reasoning process. 

Teacher Certification 

Both the Virginia State Department of 
Education and the National Association 
ot State Directors of Teacher Education 
and Certification have approved the 
teaching education programs at Mary 
Washington College. Students who 
complete an approved program qualify 
for certification in all the states with 
which Virginia has a reciprocity agree- 
ment. See also departmental offerings, 
Department of Education. 



Policies and Procedures 



13 



At Mary Washington 
College standards 
have been set to 
provide for a 
smoothly run aca- 
demic program. Rules and regu- 
lations guarantee that all students 
are treated fairly in both their 
academic and non-academic 
lives. The Student Handbook, 
issued by the Dean of Students, 
describes non-academic policies. 

For academic procedures, stu- 
dents and faculty consult this 
catalog and the Dictionary of 
Academic Regulations, a com- 
prehensive and easy-to-use refer- 
ence. Both the catalog and the 
dictionary are for the conven- 
ience and information of the 
student. Neither should be inter- 
preted as an irrevocable contract. 
Academic policies and proce- 
dures and degree requirements 
are listed according to standards 
in effect at the time of printing 
and are subject to change at the 
discretion of the College. All 
changes are announced by mail or 
in the weekly Bulletin. If a 
change is announced which 
affects the student's program, it 
is the student's responsibility to 
adjust that program accordingly 
or to obtain written confirmation 
from the Dean for any variation. 
(The Dean welcomes questions 
and requests concerning the 
interpretation and applicability 
of academic policies and proce- 
dures.) 



Since the final responsibility for 
meeting all degree requirements 
rests with the students, they 
should have complete knowledge 
of the regulations pertaining to 
the academic program of the 
College. The Dictionary will be 
distributed to each entering 
student and will be updated 
annually. 



Honor System 

Since 1944, the students of Mary 
Washington College have lived under 
the Honor System. Although its consti- 
tution is occasionally revised, the Honor 
Code has remained basically the same 
throughout the years. The Honor 
Council retains sole control of its 
operations and is responsible to the 
student body, which derives its author- 
ity to establish the Honor System from 
the Board of Visitors. Because of the 
nature of the Honor System, final 
responsibility lies with the Board of 
Visitors, but all enforcement is in the 
hands of students. 

The Honor System provides that a 
student shall act honorably in all 
relationships of campus life. Lying, 
cheating, stealing or breaking one's 
word of honor are considered infringe- 
ments of the system, and the penalty for 
violation, as determined by the Honor 
Council, may be dismissal from the 
College. The pledge required on 
quizzes, examinations, and other class- 
work means that the work the student 
submits to a professor is the student's 
own and has been completed in accord- 
ance with the requirements for the 
course as laid down by the professor. 



All students must understand that by 
accepting admission to M.irv Washing- 
ton, they make a commitment to the 
provisions of the Honor Code. Upon 
entering the College for the first lime, 
every student is given a copy of the 
complete Honor Code and is expected 
to become familiar with its provisions 
(See the Student Handbook for a copy 
of the Honor Constitution.) Student 
counselors interpret the Honor System 
to all new students before they arc asked 
to sign a pledge card stating that they 
understand what is expected and realize 
that a plea of ignorance will not be 
accepted by the Honor Council. Regis- 
tration as a student is not considered 
complete until this card has been signed. 



Calendar 

Mary Washington College uses a 
calendar of two semesters and one 
summer session. The fall semester 
begins in late August and ends in 
December; the spring semester begins 
in January and ends in Mav. Since it is 
an integral part of the school calendar, 
the summer session permits the comple- 
tion of a full semester's work, bv having 
one three-week and two four-week 
sessions. 



Course Load 

If a student intends to graduate in eight 
semesters, normal progress toward a 
degree is as follows: a minimum ot 2S 
credit hours completed tor the first two 
semesters and 15 to 18 credit hours 
completed during each ot the remaining 
six semesters, tor a total ot 122 hours. 

Under this definition ot normal pro- 
gress, students are classified as follows 
freshmen, fewer than 2S credits; sopho- 
mores. 28 to 57 credits; juniors. 58 to B 
credits; seniors. 90 credits or more. 



14 



Students wishing to accelerate and 
graduate in fewer than eight semesters, 
will consistently take 17 or 18 credits 
each semester and attend summer 
sessions. In this way, a student can 
graduate in three calendar years. 

Residential students carrying fewer than 
12 credits must have permission from 
the Dean of Students to live in a 
residence hall. Students on financial aid 
should consult the Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Aid if they wish to carry 
fewer than 12 credits. 



Attendance 

In the educational philosophy of the 
College, classroom work is an essential 
part of educational development. 
Therefore, the College expects regular 
class attendance, although it does not 
impose any set rules. An instructor may 
require a student whose absences are 
excessive to withdraw from a course. 
No less than 25 per cent of the total 
number of class meetings may be 
considered excessive, and the instructor 
must announce during the first week of 
the semester whether he will enforce 
the excessive absence rule. 

Students are responsible and account- 
able for all tests, assignments, material 
covered, and announcements made in 
class whether they are present or not. 
Leaving campus early for weekends or 
holidays is never a valid reason for 
missing classes or shifting examinations. 
Students whose class attendance is 
unnecessarily irregular may be re- 
quested by the Dean to withdraw from 
the College. 



A student who has been in the infirmary 
and has missed classes should tell the 
instructor, who may call the infirmary 
to learn whether the College physician 
has advice on how to work with the 
student. Students under the care of a 
doctor should request a memo of 
confirmation from the doctor to present 
to their instructors. A student unavoid- 
ably absent for a week or more, due to 
hospitalization, serious illness, or a 
sudden emergency, should notify the 
Advising Office as soon as possible. If 
appropriate, the Advising Office will 
inform instructors of the student's 
circumstances; but this in no way 
relieves the student of responsibility for 
course work. 

Students faced with unavoidable ex- 
tended absences should consult not only 
with their instructors but also with the 
Advising Office to discuss the advan- 
tages of withdrawing for the semester. 



Grading 



Academic performance in any course is 

rated according to the following system, 

which is printed on all grade reports: 

A unusual excellence 

B work distinctly above average 

C work of average or medium quality 

D the lowest passing mark, work of 

below average quality 
F failure, no credit in the course 
PA pass, in a pass/fail course 
FA failure, in a pass/fail course, no 

credit in the course 
SA satisfactory, in a physical education 

course 
UN unsatisfactory, in a physical educa- 
tion course, no credit in the course 
I incomplete, illness or emergency in 

final portion of a semester has pre- 
vented the student from finishing 
the course 
CR test out (credit-by-examination) 
CI test incomplete (credit-by- 
examination) 
WP withdraw passing 
WF withdraw failing 

Quality-Point Average. Each grade, A 
through D, carries a stated number of 
quality points, which are multiplied by 
the number of credit hours to compute 
the total quality points for the course. A 
carries four; B carries three; C carries 
two, and D carries one. Thus, a three- 
hour course with a grade of A provides 
12 quality points; similarly; if a course 
carries four hours of credit and the 
grade is A, it provides 16 quality points. 

The quality-point average is computed 
by dividing the total under hours 
attempted (on the grade report) into the 
total under Quality Points. Note that 
the hours attempted column does not 
include credit-by-examination, transfer 
credits, or physical education hours. 



■ : 



Pass/Fail Option. With the approval of 
an academic adviser (for freshmen and 
sophomores) or a department adviser 
(for juniors and seniors), a student may 
take one course each semester or during 
a complete summer session on a pass/tail 
basis for a maximum of eight pass/fail 
courses during the entire degree pro- 
gram. A grade of PA (pass) does not 
affect the quality-point average, but a 
grade of FA (failure) in a pass/fail 
course counts the same as an F in a 
graded course and will lower the 
quality-point average. These courses 
can be used for competence, elective, or 
diversification credit, but not for basic 
or major requirements. A student may 
take a pass/fail and a physical education 
course in the same semester. The 
decision to take a course pass/ fail must 
be made within the first two weeks of 
the semester. If the decision is not made 
at the time of registration, the Advising 
Office must change a course from 
graded to pass/fail or from pass/fail to 
graded. Before electing to use the 
pass/fail option, a student should 
consider its effect on his opportunity to 
earn academic awards and distinctions, 
for these are calculated on the basis of a 
specified minimum number of graded 
credit hours. 



Credit-By-Examination. An enrolled 
student may request from a department 
a special examination on any course for 
which an examination is appropriate. If 
the student passes the examination, the 
course and a grade of "CR" will be 
recorded on his transcript for hour 
credit, but not for quality-point credit. 
It the student fails the examination, a 
grade of "CI" (Test Incomplete) is 
recorded. During the next regular 
semester this grade must be removed by 
taking and passing the course; other- 
wise, the Test Incomplete will be 
converted to an "F." The course may be 
taken on a graded or pass/fail basis. If 
taken on a graded basis, the course may 
count toward the major program or be 
used to satisfy Basic Requirements. A 
fee is charged for this examination. 
Credit-by-Examination is not available 
for such courses as seminars, individual 
study, studio, and laboratory courses. 



Transfer Credit 

A student enrolled at the College who 
plans to earn transfer credit from 
another institution should provide a 
catalog description of the course or 
courses, and request advance approval 
from the Office of the Dean, before 
registering tor the course. If the course 
is approved and the student earns a 
grade of C or better, the credits are 
recorded on the student's permanent 
record at Mary Washington. Trans- 
cripts of courses approved for transfer 
credit should be sent directly to the 
Office of Student Records. 

Grades earned in transfer work do not 
affect the student's quality point aver- 
age at Mary Washington College. 
Credit is given for the hours only. 



Continuing at the College 

Regularly enrolled Mary Washington 
students are asked to indicate each year 
their intention to return for the fall 
session. A form is mailed early in the 
second semester and must be returned 
by a specified deadline with a $10 
processing fee and a SI 00 room deposit 
for dormitory students, or a $50 fee 
deposit for commuting students. The 
form and room deposit must be returned 
by the deadline if residential space is to 
be guaranteed. 

Students whose completed forms and 
deposits are received after the deadline 
may be placed on a waiting list for 
residential accommodations. 

The $10 processing fee is non- 
refundable; the $100 deposit or $50 fee 
deposit is applied to the student's 
account for the following session. It is 
not normally refundable after a speci- 
fied deadline unless the student is 
ineligible to continue, or unless the 
Comptroller and Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Aid agree that unusual 
circumstances justify a refund. 

Although the College makes every 
effort to furnish forms tor returning 
students directly to enrolled students, it 
is the responsibility of the individual 
student to file the form. These forms 
and instructions are available from the 
Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid. 



16 



Academic Probation 

Academic probation means a state of 
warning that a student does not have, 
for all recorded work at Mary 
Washington College, a C average on 
graded courses. After every grading 
period all students are sent probation 
notices (or suspension notices) if their 
overall grade-point averages have fallen 
or remained below 2.00. 

A student placed on probation must 
consult the faculty adviser and the 
Advising Office. 



Academic Suspension 

Students must be suspended for aca- 
demic deficiency if they fall below a 
"C" average for the fourth semester, 
whether successive or not. Suspension 
means that a student may not register 
for classes for at least two successive 
semesters, a full summer session count- 
ing as a semester. After that time, 
continuance is possible only after a 
schedule of return to good standing has 
been agreed upon in writing between 
Dean and student. The student must 
maintain this schedule in order to 
continue at the College. 



Withdrawal from 
the College 

A student who wishes to withdraw from 
the College during the semester must 
notify the Office of the Dean in person 
and, if a minor, must have written 
consent of parent or guardian. The 
College requests that the student also 
meet with an academic adviser in the 
Advising Office. At that time, the 
student may be placed on leave of 
absence. 



Returning to the College 

Returning After Leave of Absence. A 

student who wishes to return after a 
leave of absence should write the Dean 
of Admissions and Financial Aid and ask 
for the appropriate form. The form is 
returned with a $10 processing fee and 
the room or fee deposit, under the same 
conditions as regularly enrolled students 
who wish to continue at the College. 

Unless there is an exceptional circum- 
stance, students who take leaves of 
absence from the College can expect 
to be re-enrolled without difficulty. 
They should apply as soon as possible, 
especially if they wish residential 
accommodations. 



Returning After Withdrawal. A student 
who withdraws from the College 
during the semester or at the end of a 
semester is not automatically re- 
enrolled, but must submit a form to the 
Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 
indicating a desire to return to Mary 
Washington. Work taken at another 
institution as well as that at Mary 
Washington, will be taken into con- 
sideration by the Committte on 
Admissions. 

Returning After Suspension. A student 
suspended from the College for other 
than academic deficiency, should con- 
tact the Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Aid for appropriate forms. 

Students suspended for academic defi- 
ciencies will not be considered eligible 
to return until they have been away 
from the College for at least two 
semesters (the full summer session 
counting as a semester). Upon receipt of 
the appropriate form, the Dean of 
Admissions and Financial Aid will 
consult with the Dean of the College. 
In addition, the student must meet with 
the Dean of the College to draw up a 
schedule of return to good academic 
standing. 



Services and Activities 



17 



Academic 

The College provides 
a number of facili- 
ties and services to 
assist students with 
their academic study 
and planning. These include the 
library facilities, academic advis- 
ing, career planning and job 
placement, the audio-visual cen- 
ter and the computer. 

The Library 

The E. Lee Trinkle Library, named after 
the man who served as Governor of 
Virginia from 1922 to 1926, contains one 
of the finest collections for undergrad- 
uates in the Commonwealth. The 
resources include more than 260,000 
cataloged volumes, 1,127 current maga- 
zine and newspaper subscriptions, and 
additional collections in microfilm, 
including the New York Times from its 
beginning date of 1851 to the present 
time and the Fredericksburg Free Lance Star 
from 1926. As a United States Federal 
Government depository since 1940, the 
library receives approximately 4,000 
documents annually. 

The Daniel H. Woodward Rare Book 
Room houses a collection of more than 
2,000 unique, rare, or very valuable 
works. Among the holdings is an 
incunabulum, a 1496 printing ot Pliny's 
Naturalis Historia. A special collection of 
first and scarce editions of James Joyce's 
writings and another of the works of 
Claude Bernard, the 19th century 
physiologist, are numbered among the 
items in the Woodward Collection. 



The building, one of the most beautiful 
on campus, was erected in 1941. An 
addition, constructed in 1963, provided 
extra stack and seating space. Although 
the beauty of the original structure has 
been preserved, the floors have been 
carpeted and new lighting installed. A 
variety of seating is provided, including 
individual study carrels. A typing room 
furnished with typewriters is provided 
for students at no charge. Copying 
service is available in the building at a 
nominal cost. The Library is open 91 
hours each week during the regular 
session. During those hours it offers a 
variety of services based on the educa- 
tional concept which holds that a library 
is the natural extension of the class- 
room. Instead of a passive, custodial 
role, the Library staff pursues an active, 
teaching role in the intellectual devel- 
opment of the student. Beyond the 
traditional reference services that are 
offered by professional librarians 76 
hours weekly, a variety of library 
instructional programs designed to aid 
students in acquiring competence in the 
effective use of the library are regularly 
scheduled. Individualized instruction 
including term paper clinics and disci- 
pline-oriented research seminars, with 
individualized consultations, are offered 
each semester. Course-related instruc- 
tion arranged through the Professor and 
a one-credit course in "Library Resour- 
ces and Their Use" are two additional 
forms of library instruction which 
attempt to make the library more 
meaningful for the student. A wide 
selection of subject and discipline- 
related biliographies and research aids, a 
regularly revised library handbook, and 
a quarterly library newsletter entitled 
News and Views from Trinkle arc among 
the library publications provided to aid 
students in making more effective use of 
the resources at Trinkle Library. 



The Trinkle Library is a member of 
the Southeastern Library Network 
(SOLINET), a cooperative biblio- 
graphic utility which provides access to 
an on-line, machine-readable data base 
for use in cataloging and processing the 
materials acquired by the Library. 

A friends of the library group known as 
The Associates of Trinkle Library was 
formed in 1978. The organization is 
concerned with promoting the enjoy- 
ment of books and libraries and offers 
programs designed to enrich the cultural 
and intellectual life of the campus and 
its members. 

Academic Advising 

The Academic Advising Office is 
staffed by professional counselors and 
faculty members who are available 
throughout the year to advise students 
concerning their current academic 
program, to assist them in planning the 
next semester's or year's program, and 
to suggest sources of information on 
post-college opportunities. All students 
who have not declared majors are 
officially advised through this office. 
Students are also encouraged to consult 
with faculty advisers in the areas ot 
their academic interests. 

Career Planning and 
Placement 

While the primary goal ot Marv 
Washington College is to provide a 
sound liberal arts education tor its 
students, the College is aware ot the 
need tor most students to secure a 
remunerative position upon leaving 
college. To help them find the position 
or graduate school best suited to their 
talents and needs, the College provides 
career planning workshops throughout 
the year for all students and special 
resume writing and interview skills 
workshops (or seniors I lie Assistant 



Dean for Career Services conducts most 
of these workshops. His office also 
publishes a newsletter with news of job 
possibilities and other career planning 
suggestions. The Placement Bureau 
compiles, at the student's request, a 
personnel file, which can be sent to 
prospective employers. This service is 
also available to alumni. The Placement 
Bureau also schedules interviews with 
prospective employers on campus and 
maintains a file of job openings. 

The Audio-Visual Center 

The Audio-Visual Center, located in 
Chandler Hall, offers audio and video 
taping facilities, photography, slide 
production, loan and repair of A-V 
equipment, and graphic production. The 
center's staff oversees the operation 
of the George Washington Hall stage 
facilities. 

Faculty and qualified students may 
borrow tape recorders, record players, 
sound systems, microphones, cameras, 
movie projectors, slide projectors and 
video equipment from the A-V Center. 
Equipment and film rental catalogs are 
also available in the center. The staff 
offers technical assistance between the 
hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. 

The Computer 

A Hewlett Packard 3000 Series II 
Computer system was recently installed 
in the college's administrative building 
to handle student financial and record 
keeping operations. Although the com- 
puter's primary function is adminis- 
trative, it is also being used as an 
instructional tool in courses taught by 
several academic departments. The 
ability to simultaneously support both 
academic and administrative applica- 
tions is one of the strengths of the new 
system. 



Non- Academic 

The College has a large range of 
activities and services concerned with 
the non-academic aspects of college life. 
These are under the direction ot the 
Dean of Students and are covered in 
detail in the Student Handbook, pub- 
lished by her office. A few examples are 
included here. 

Sports 

Mary Washington has both men's and 
women's intercollegiate teams. There 
are men's intercollegiate teams in 
basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, 
tennis and track and field. The program 
grows as the number of men on campus 
increases. Women have intercollegiate 
teams in basketball, cross country, golf, 
field hockey, lacrosse, riding, swim- 
ming, tennis, track and field, and 
volleyball. State championships were 
won by the basketball and volleyball 
teams in 1979-80. 

A modern physical education building 
provides a basketball gymnasium, dance 
studios, an intercollegiate swimming 
pool with one and three meter boards, 
an auxiliary gymnasium, a weight 
training room, a handball-racketball 
court, two competitive volleyball courts 
and a multi-purpose activities room. 
Outdoor facilities include fields for 
flag-football, hockey, lacrosse, softball 
and soccer, a cross-country course, a 
new 10-court lighted tennis complex, 
golf driving and putting area and a new 
8-lane, 400 meter track. 

The Recreation Association sponsors 
intramurals in flag-football, soccer, 
racketball, volleyball, basketball and 
water polo. The Association also 
sponsors trips, classes, clinics and clubs 
in these and other sports. 



Clubs 

Most academic departments have inter- 
est clubs or honoraries; there are also 
clubs for students interested in physical 
therapy, medical studies, and interna- 
tional relations. There are Afro- 
Americans, Young Democrats, Young 
Republicans, and off-campus branches 
of student religious organizations. 
Students produce three regular publica- 
tions — a weekly newspaper, a year- 
book, and a literary magazine. 

Residence Halls 

Seventeen residence halls on campus 
offer students a wide choice in life 
styles. Small language and honor houses, 
an academic/quiet student house, single 
sex, and co-educational halls are avail- 
able to students. Each hall is staffed 
with a full time residence direc- 
tor/coordinator, and specially selected 
upperclass students trained to assist 
students in college life. 

Health Center 

The College Health Center offers 
students diagnostic reterral services as 
well as special care in its 31 bed facility. 
A full time physician, 24 hour staffing 
by registered nurses, and consulting 
services from area specialists help to 
give Mary Washington College students 
a comprehensive health resource. 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center also looks 
toward the health needs of students by 
offering personal counseling services, 
and, when needed, making referrals to 
community resources. The Center also 
provides students with both academic 
and vocational testing administration. 



Admission 



19 



M 



ary Washington 
College takes a 
personal ap- 
proach to admis- 
sions. Each ad- 
missions application is discussed 
and weighed along with other 
information provided. Personal 
interviews are encouraged, and 
supporting information about 
each candidate is helpful in the 
selection process. The admissions 
office is open for visits and is 
willing to answer questions and 
provide information about any 
aspect of college life. 

Mary Washington College does 
not discriminate in recruiting, 
admitting, or enrolling students 
on the basis of race, color, 
religion, physical disability, na- 
tional origin, political affiliation, 
marital status, sex, or age. 
Questions may be directed to the 
AAEEO Officer, Mary Wa- 
shington College. 

For the purposes of initial admis- 
sion and continuance there are 
two ways in which students may 
be classified: regular and special. 



Admission 

as a Regular Student 

To be admitted as a regular student, an 
individual must submit a full application 
with all supportive transcripts trom 
secondary school and all collegiate 
institutions attended. This application, 
along with information furnished by the 
secondary school and results ot the 



College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test, 
is reviewed by the appropriate Commit- 
tee on Admissions, and upon its deci- 
sion, the applicant is either admitted or 
not admitted as a degree-seeking 
student at Mary Washington College. 

A regular student may be full-time or 
part-time. This is determined at the 
time the student registers for classes and 
depends upon the number of hours 
carried for credit. Generally, a regular 
student must register for 12 or more 
credit hours to qualify for full-time 
status. A regular student may, however, 
be given permission by the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs and 
Dean and the Dean of Students to 
maintain full-time student status and 
register for fewer than 12 credit hours 
for reasons of health, academic perfor- 
mance, service in the student leadership 
role of President of the Honor Council 
or President of the Student Association, 
or for other special circumstances. 
Students receiving this permission shall 
pay the tuition and fees of a regular 
student with full-time student status. 
During the semester, a regular lull-time 
student may drop without permission 
below a course load of 12 credit hours 
and become a part-time student; in such 
cases there will be no remission of fees. 
A student may not live in college 
housing while carrying fewer than 12 
credit hours without permission from 
the Dean of Students. Students receiv- 
ing financial assistance must consult 
with the Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Aid concerning the conse- 
quences of dropping below a course load 
of 12 credit hours. 

A person who has been admitted as a 
regular student remains a regular 
student until graduation trom Mary 
Washington College. That person 
cannot become a special student after 
having been admitted as a regular 
student. 



Admission 

as a Special Student 

Applicants for admission as special 
students are most often those who are 
interested not in a degree but in specific 
courses, or students at other institutions 
who wish to earn credits to transfer to 
their own institutions. 

Special students complete a greatly 
abbreviated application form. The Vice 
President for Continuing Education 
makes the decision on the admission of 
special students. Special student admis- 
sion is an open-door policy as long as the 
student's record appears to be clear. 
Admission as a special student is not 
admission to a degree program of the 
College. 

The special student will be notified of 
the specific time of registration. Al- 
though the application may be submit- 
ted at any time up to the first day of 
class, it is more convenient it the 
application is submitted well in 
advance. 

Special students may be full-time or 
part-time; however, almost all special 
students are part-time. This is the intent 
of the program. A part-time student can 
take 1 1 credit hours or fewer and pay by 
the credit hour attempted. A special 
student can seek permission ot the Vice 
President tor Continuing Education to 
be a full-time special student. Certain 
criteria must be met it such permission 
is to be granted. Full-time special 
students are college graduates who are 
seeking certification in education or a 
similar field, college students who are 
taking a toll program of study which 
they have been given permission to 
transfer to their parent institution to 
complete a degree program, or students 
who are taking a roll program to qualify 
tor graduate or professional school. 



20 



A person who has applied to Mary 
Washington College as a regular 
student for any session and who has been 
denied admission is not eligible to apply 
to the college for that same session as a 
special student. 

A person who has at one time been a 
special student at Mary Washington 
College can apply at a later date as a 
regular student. The person then 
submits the regular student application 
with all supportive information. This 
application will be reviewed by the 
Committee on Admissions. 

Admission Directly after 
High School 

A student who intends to enter Mary 
Washington directly after high school 
graduation should request application 
materials from the Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Aid early in the first 
semester of the senior year. Students 
requesting a decision under the Early 
Decision Plan should also request the 
Early Decision Agreement form. 

The application should be returned as 
soon as convenient. The transcript form 
must be completed by the appropriate 
high school official and returned. If the 
scores earned on the Scholastic Aptitude 
and Achievement Tests have not already 
been sent to the College, the applicant 
should request the College Board to 
send them directly to Mary Wash- 
ington. 

The suggested deadline for submitting 
an application is March 1. All applicants 
who meet this deadline will be notified 
of the Committee's decision by April 1. 
All acceptances are conditional upon 
second semester performance. 



A student who applies after the sug- 
gested March 1 deadline follows the 
same procedure. Applications will be 
considered on a space available basis. 
The Committee will announce its 
decision as soon as possible after 
materials have been received. 

Application Fee. All students send a $15 
non-refundable application fee with the 
initial application. 

Early Decision Plan. The student who 
has selected Mary Washington College 
as a first choice may wish to apply for 
admission under the Early Decision 
Plan. Under this plan the student agrees 
to accept an offer of admission, if it is 
extended by the Committee on Admis- 
sions. The College in return agrees to 
announce its decision by December 1. 

Interested candidates should request an 
Early Decision form along with regular 
application materials, early in the 
fall semester of the senior year. The 
candidate may apply to other colleges 
but must agree to withdraw those 
applications if notified of acceptance by 
Mary Washington. 

The application form, the Early Deci- 
sion form, the transcript, and results of 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test should be 
submitted to the College before No- 
vember 1. The Committee on Admis- 
sions will review the materials and 
notify the applicant by December 1. 
Achievement tests may be completed 
during the senior year. 

Should the Committee not act favorably 
on an early decision request, the 
applicant's file will remain active, and 
the Committee will reconsider it after 
the candidate submits additional grades 
and/or scores at the end of the fall 
semester. 



High School Preparation. The general 
academic requirements for admission 
are graduation from an accredited 
secondary school or the equivalent and 
credit for at least sixteen academic 
units. The units presented must include 
a major emphasis in areas of college 
preparatory work. Careful attention is 
given in the admissions process to the 
quantity and quality of the college 
preparatory curriculum. 

Applicants should complete, as a mini- 
mum, four years of English, three years 
of mathematics (including algebra II), 
one or more years of laboratory science 
and of social studies, and at least two 
years of foreign language. Elective units 
earned in art, music, drama, journalism, 
etc., will also be considered. Although 
no requirements for admission are 
absolute, experience has shown that 
successful students at the College have 
completed this suggested program of 
study. 

Examinations. Students entering di- 
rectly from high school are required to 
take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Board and to request that the 
results be sent to the College. The SAT 
should be taken no later than the 
January test date in the senior year. 
If the test is taken after that date, 
consideration of the application must 
depend on space available when the 
score is received. 

It is strongly recommended, but not 
required, that applicants submit 
achievement test scores. Students wish- 
ing to be considered for exemption from 
the College competence requirement in 
English composition must take the 
English Composition Achievement 
Test. Achievement test scores in foreign 
language may be submitted for place- 
ment. 



21 



Information about the tests may be 
obtained from the College Board 
Admissions Testing Program, Box 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or from 
secondary school counselors. When 
making application for the tests, the 
student should specify that the results be 
sent to Mary Washington College 
(College Code Number 5398). 

Character, Personality and Interests. In 

addition to the scholastic record, 
recommendations from appropriate 
school officials are welcomed. Such 
recommendations should include an 
assessment of academic potential, as 
well as character, personality, and 
interests. Activities that reflect leader- 
ship or intellectual interests are impres- 
sive only if they reinforce sound 
academic achievement. Since Mary 
Washington operates under a successful 
honor system, assurance of personal 
integrity is indispensable. 

Committee Review. The Committee on 
Admissions approves applicants only if 
they seem prepared to succeed in a 
competitive, liberal arts curriculum. 
The Committee considers academic 
achievement, class rank, secondary 
school recommendations, aptitude, and 
achievement test results, as well as a 
pattern of courses demonstrating inter- 
est and competence in the liberal arts 
and sciences. 

The Committee feels that the senior 
year is extremely important, and that 
such basic academic subjects as English, 
mathematics, laboratory sciences, and 
foreign language should be continued 
through the final term. 



Admissions Deposit. Students accepted 
by the College send an answer and a 
deposit — dormitory students submit a 
$100 room deposit, and commuting 
students submit a $50 fee deposit. 
Students applying by March 1, who are 
notified by April 1, are required to 
answer and to send the deposit by May 
1. If the application is late, and the letter 
of acceptance is received after May 1, 
the deposit is due within two weeks. 
The deposit is applied to the first 
semester charges. Unless the student has 
asked for Early Decision, the deposit is 
refundable upon request until May 1. If 
the student is accepted for the spring 
semester, the deposit is refundable upon 
request until December 15. 

Medical Examination. All entering 
students who intend to reside on campus 
must present a certificate from a 
physician stating that they have had a 
recent physical examination. A form for 
the doctor's use is provided and must be 
completed after April 1 and returned 
not later than July 15. 

Deferred Enrollment. Upon request, an 
accepted student may have one year to 
exercise the option of enrolling. De- 
layed enrollment is subject to admission 
requirements in force at the time the 
initial decision is made. If students 
enroll at another institution before 
enrolling at Mary Washington, they 
must apply again as transfer students. 

Students will be subject to rules, 
regulations, and financial charges in 
effect when they actually enroll. 



Advanced Placement. Students entering 
from high school may apply for college 
credit through the examination given by 
the Advanced Placement Program of 
the College Entrance Examination 
Board. These examinations are offered 
in May in various academic areas. For 
further information students should 
consult their high school guidance 
counselors. 

Interested students should have the 
results of the Advanced Placement 
examination forwarded to the College. 
Normally, credit is given for a score of 
three or higher. Credits earned in this 
manner may not count toward the 
major program. They may, however, be 
used to satisfy Basic Requirements. 

Challenge Examination. These may be 
taken by an entering student to support 
a petition for academic credit for 
mastery of subject matter covered by 
elected courses offered by Mary Wash- 
ington College. Challenge examina- 
tions may not be taken in studio and 
laboratory courses, seminars, indi- 
vidual study courses, and many upper- 
level courses. Credits earned in this 
manner may not count toward the 
major program, but may be used to 
satisfy Basic Requirements. A fee is 
charged for taking a challenge examina- 
tion. 



Transfers from Other 
Colleges 

The Admissions Committee makes its 
decision on transfer students on the Kim- 
of the application, a high school 
transcript, transcripts of .ill college 
work, and the Scholastic Aptitude Test. 



22 



Candidates may be considered for 
transfer admission if they are entitled to 
honorable dismissal without academic 
or social probation in the last institution 
attended. 

Transfer Credit. As a rule, transfer 
credit is given for courses of the same 
type (liberal arts courses) and under the 
same guidelines as courses offered at 
Mary Washington. Courses for which 
transfer credit is requested must not 
overlap those which the student takes at 
the College, and a minimum grade of C 
must have been earned. New transfer 
students should have transcripts from 
other institutions sent directly to the 
Office of Admissions. This office will 
complete an estimate of transfer credits 
to be allowed. After admission proce- 
dures have been completed, a final 
evaluation will be issued by the Office 
of the Dean. 

Residence Requirement for Transfer 
Credit. To be eligible for a Mary 
Washington degree, a student must be 
enrolled on campus the last semester and 
earn 30 semester hours of credits from 
the College. Also, at least three-fourths 
of the major program must be earned 
at the College. Full information on 
transfer credit is given under "Aca- 
demic Regulations and Policies." A 
preliminary evaluation of transfer credit 
may be made by the Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Aid, but all final decisions 
are made by the Office of the Dean. 
Transfer credit is made a part of the 
permanent record when the student has 
completed one semester's work at Mary 
Washington College. 



Procedure. The Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Aid will send a prospective 
transfer student an application and a 
secondary school transcript form. The 
student must complete and return the 
application and arrange for the high 
school transcript form to be completed 
and sent by appropriate secondary 
school official. He must also arrange for 
transcripts to be sent from all colleges 
he has attended. 

A transfer applicant is urged to submit 
all materials early in the first semester 
of the year prior to transfer. The 
Committee on Admissions will make a 
preliminary evaluation of this informa- 
tion and a final decision upon receipt of 
the first semester or quarter grades. 

Examination. A candidate must submit 
the results of the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test, normally included on the high 
school transcript. A candidate who 
cannot meet these testing requirements 
should consult with the Dean of 
Admissions and Financial Aid for advice 
about appropriate substitutions. 

Committee Review. The Committee 
considers many factors in judging 
whether the transfer candidate can 
succeed at Mary Washington College, 
but puts particular emphasis on the 
program and academic achievement in 
the last college attended. 

Fees and Deposits. These are the same 
as for students entering directly from 
high school. 

Medical Examination. All entering 
transfer students who intend to reside 
on campus must also present a certifi- 
cate from a physician stating that they 
have had a recent physical examination. 
A form for the doctor's use is provided 
and must be completed after April 1 and 
returned not later then July 15. 



Admission before High 
School Graduation 

Selected students with exceptional 
ability can enroll at Mary Washington 
College before they have graduated 
from high school under one of three 
plans. 

Admission to the Summer Session. 

A high school senior whose level of 
intellectual and personal maturity and 
academic promise is of the highest 
caliber is eligible to apply to the 
summer session. A principal or guidance 
counselor must recommend the student. 

After consulting the principal or guid- 
ance counselor, the student submits a 
summer session application. If accepted, 
the student takes the same courses and 
course load as any freshman student. 
Credit and grades earned are added to 
the student's permanent record at Mary 
Washington. 

Admission to the summer session, for 
any student, does not constitute admis- 
sion to the regular session. A student 
who wishes to earn a Mary Washington 
degree applies, using the regular proce- 
dure, during the first semester of the 
senior year. 

Admission to Part-Time Study during 
the Regular Session. Qualified seniors in 
an area high school who wish to 
supplement their academic loads in the 
senior year may apply for admission as 
part-time students. 

The candidate submits the special 
student application, a high school 
transcript, and a letter of recommenda- 
tion for this program from the principal 
or director of guidance. 



23 



Admission after the Junior Year. This 
program, in which the student enters as 
a full-time freshman after the junior 
year in high school, is designed for a 
small number of exceptionally qualified 
students who have completed almost all 
of the 16 credits required for admission. 

To be considered, a candidate must have 
all required credits in mathematics, 
science, and foreign language. Most 
commonly, the student has at the end of 
the junior year only one unit in English 
and one in social science to complete. 

The admission procedure is the same as 
for a regular candidate, except that the 
student usually applies in the spring. 
The student presents Scholastic Apti- 
tude Tests results with the applications, 
and must submit Achievement Test 
results before enrolling. 

Such a student needs all the materials 
required of a regular candidate; in 
addition, the high school counselor will 
be asked to speak directly to the 
question of the student's maturity. The 
Admissions Committee examines the 
application using the same criteria as for 
a senior, with the addition of the 
statement of maturity. 

A Virginia student can arrange with the 
secondary school principal to be gradu- 
ated from high school at the end of the 
freshman year at Mary Washington by 
using College courses to fulfill a 
maximum of two high school credits. 



Fees and Assistance 



Semester Fees and 
Expenses 

The fees outlined in this section have 
been approved by the Board of Visitors 
and are effective for the 1980-81 fiscal 
year. Any changes from this schedule of 
fees will be announced immediately. 

Questions about fees and payment 
procedures should be directed to the 
Office of Student Accounts, George 
Washington Hall, telephone (703) 899- 
4631. 

Questions about financial assistance and 
general college expenses should be 
forwarded to the Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Aid, Room 303, George 
Washington Hall, telephone (703) 899- 
4681. 



Full-time Residential Students. The fee 

schedule below is lor a student carrying 
12-18 semester credit hours. A student 
carrying more than 18 semester credit 
hours must pay a tuition overload fee 
for each additional credit hour (see next 
page). 



1980-81 Fees 

Virginia 
Students 

Tuition 

Comprehensive 
Fee* 

Residential 
Fee 

Board 

Total 

Virginia 

Students 



Non-Virginia 
Students 

Tuition 

Comprehensive 
Fee* 

Residential 
Fee 

Board 

Total 

Non-Virginia 

Students 



Year Total Per Semester 



$ 788.00 $ 394.00 



82.00 

1.115.00 

840.00 

$2,825.00 



41.00 

557.50 
420.00 



$1,412.50 



Year Total Per Semester 



$1,633.00 $ 816.50 



82.00 

1,115.00 
840.00 



41.00 

557.50 
420.00 



$3,670.00 $1,835.00 



The residential fee includes infirmary 
services; however, any prescribed 
medication is charged to the student's 
account. 

The board charge includes three meals a 
day, seven days a week, throughout the 
academic session. All residential stu- 
dents must participate in the board plan; 
no partial plans are available. 



Full-time Non-Residential Students. 



1980-81 Fees 

Virginia 
Students 

Tuition 

Comprehensive 
Fee* 

Total 

Virginia 
Students 



Year Total Per Semster 



$ 788.00 



82.00 



$ 870.00 



$ 394.00 



41.00 



$ 435.00 



Non-Virginia 
Students 

Tuition 

Comprehensive 
Fee* 

Total 

Non-Virgina 

Students 



Year Total Per Semester 



$1,633.00 $ 816.50 



82.00 



41.00 



$1,715.00 $ 857.50 



'Comprehensive Fee. The comprehensive fee is 
used to support student organizations and 
activities, athletic programs, and a variety of 
concerts, movies, and other events to benefit the 
student body. Most of these activities are 
provided without additional charges to the 
student. 

Part-time Students. Part-time students 
register for fewer than 12 semester 
credit hours. Virginia students are 
charged $28 per credit hour and non- 
Virginia students, $56 per credit hour. 

Part-time students also pay a non- 
refundable $15 special student registra- 
tion fee which permits enrollment in 
fall and spring semesters. 



25 



Students participating in the off-campus 
teacher training program who are part- 
time are charged on the basis of the 
number of credits for which the student 
is enrolled at Mary Washington, A non- 
refundable fee of $100 is charged at the 
time a student-teaching application is 
submitted and will be credited to the 
account if the student enrolls in the 



course. 



Part-time students are not ordinarily 
eligible for infirmary or dining hall 
services, or admission to those events 
covered by the Comprehensive Fee. A 
part-time student may participate in one 
or all of these services by paying the 
appropriate fee at registration. Use of 
these services will depend on their 
availability at the time of the request. 

Other Required Fees. Application Fee — 
Degree Seeking Applicants. A non- 
refundable fee must accompany the 
application for admission from a first- 
time undergraduate, degree seeking 
applicant. This fee is applied to the cost 
of processing the application for admis- 
sion or the form for continuance. It is 
entirely separate from other fees, is not 
refundable, and cannot be deducted 
from other charges. 

The fee applicable for 1980-82 is: 

Applicants for the Academic Year 
1980-81 $10.00 

Applicants for the Academic Year 
1981-82 $15.00 

Contingent Fee. All residential students 
must pay a $100 contingent fee upon 
initial enrollment to the College. This 
fee is in addition to the fees outlined 
above and is included in the bill for the 
first semester, and is due with the first 
payment. The contingent fee will be 
applied against damage charges, out- 
standing balances, etc. Total deposit or 
balance in account is refunded upon 
graduation or withdrawal from the 
College. 



Declaration to Continue Processing Fee. 

A nonrefundable fee of $10 must be paid 
by all undergraduate degree-seeking 
students (except BLS students) return- 
ing to or continuing in the College. 

Other Fees 

Late Payment Fee. A fee of $25 will be 
charged to those students whose ac- 
counts are not paid in full by the 
published deadline date for payment of 
fees. 

Tuition Overload Fee. A full-time 
student registered for more than 18 
semester credit hours is required to pay 
an additional fee. For Virginia students 
the charge is $28 per credit hour for 
each credit hour exceeding 18 and $56 
per credit hour for non-Virginia stu- 
dents. 

Returned Check Fee. There is a service 
charge of $7.50 for each check returned 
for insufficient funds or similar reasons. 
A cashier's check is then required in 
place of the returned check. 

Audit Fee. Part-time students may audit 
a course for no credit on a space 
available basis for a fee of $15 per credit 
hour. 

Credit-by-Examination. Degree seeking 
students may take special or individually 
prepared examinations for which credit 
is awarded for a fee of $45. 

Riding Fee. Classes in horsemanship are 
available and require payment of a 
special instructional fee. Transportation 
is available at an additional fee. 

Junior Year Abroad Fee. Students plan- 
ning Junior Year Abroad must pay a 
program service fee of $25 per semester 
for advising, counseling, and other 
administrative detail required for this 
program. 



Speech Pathology Fee. Students leaving 
the College to complete the fourth year 
in Speech Pathology must pay a 
program service fee of S50 prior to 
enrolling in the cooperating institution. 

Medical Technology Fee. Students pursu- 
ing the fourth year of Medical Technol- 
ogy at a cooperating institution shall 
pay the established tuition rates at Mary 
Washington College, if tuition is not 
charged by the cooperating institution, 
or shall pay the difference between the 
tuition charged by the cooperating 
institution and the tuition at Mary 
Washington College, if tuition of the 
cooperating institution is less than the 
Mary Washington College tuition. 

Bachelor of Liberal Studies Life/Work 
Portfolio. BLS candidates will pay a S25 
fee for the review of their life/work 
portfolio. 

Senior Citizens. A legal resident of 
Virginia 60 years of age or older may 
take courses at Mary Washington at 
reduced rates provided space is availa- 
ble. A resident having a taxable income 
not exceeding $5,000 for federal income 
tax purposes for the preceding year may 
enroll in courses for credit or non-credit 
or may audit credit courses (attend 
classes without receiving grades) at no 
charge. A Virginia senior citizen with 
federal taxable income levels exceeding 
$5,000 may audit credit courses or enroll 
in non-credit courses without paying 
general college fees, but must pay 
general college fees in order to take 
courses for college credit. The applica- 
tion fee of $15 will be charged an 
applicant whose taxable income exceeds 
$5,000. 



26 



Terms of Payment 

All tees, including room and board, are 
billed and payable in advance by the 
semester. 

Room and Tuition Deposits. Atter 
notification of acceptance for admission 
or continuance by the Dean ot Admis- 
sions and Financial Aid, a deposit of 
S100 is required of a residential student, 
and a S50 deposit is required of a non- 
residential student. No student will be 
assigned a residence hall room until this 
payment has been received. These 
deposits are not normally refundable 
after a specified deadline and are 
applied to the fees for the regular 
session immediately following. 

Exceptions to the policy will be made 
only in the most unusual circumstances, 
as determined by the Comptroller and 
the Dean of Admissions and Financial 
Aid. 

Statements and Due Dates. Each student 
is mailed a statement well in advance of 
the beginning of each semester and 
payment is due by the date specified on 
the statement. Any variations from the 
terms ot payment listed below must 
be approved in writing by the Comp- 
troller prior to the due dates. 

If a full-time student has not received a 
statement of charges and fees by three 
weeks prior to the beginning of the 
semester, the student should notify the 
Otfice of the Comptroller as soon as 
possible, so that a statement can be 
prepared, mailed, and the account paid 
by the due date. 

A late payment fee of S25 will be 
charged to any student whose tull 
payment has not been received in the 
Otfice ot the Comptroller by the due 
date. 



At the end of the semester a student's 
account will include any charges 
incurred for library fines, lost books, 
parking tickets, drug costs, lost keys, 
building and equipment damage, and 
any other miscellaneous charges not 
covered by the contingent fee. At this 
time, any student whose tull account has 
not been settled will not be permitted to 
take exams, receive grades or trans- 
cripts, or be eligible to return to the 
College until the account is settled. 

Scholarship and Loan Awards. It a 

student is receiving financial aid 
through Mary Washington College, one 
halt the annual award will be shown on 
each semester statement. It an award 
has not been credited on the statement, 
notify the Office ot the Comptroller 
immediately so that a revised bill may 
be prepared. 

If a student is receiving tinancial aid 
from a source other than the College, it 
is the student's responsibility to insure 
that notification of the award, its 
amount, and method of payment have 
been received in the Office o( the 
Comptroller by the statement due date. 
Failure to provide such notification 
could result in a student's account being 
delinquent. 

Delinquent Accounts. Any charge in- 
curred in collecting a delinquent ac- 
count will be added to the account. This 
applies, but is not limited to charges by 
an attorney or collection agency. 

Refund of Fees. A student who with- 
draws from the College during the 
semester should notify the Office of the 
Dean immediately upon withdrawal 
and complete the withdrawal form. A 
copy of the form will be sent to the 
Office of the Comptroller and will 
serve as the basis for withdrawal 
charges and credits. 



All students, full- or part-time, 
residential or non-residential, must 
withdraw through the Office of the 
Dean. Adjustment of charges and 
credits may be made only by the Office 
ot the Comptroller. 

The following charges are applicable 
for students withdrawing during the 
semester: 



Withdrawal Charges 

Semester Basis lst/15th 16th/55th After 55th 

day of day ot day of 

semester semester semester 

Tuition 20% of 50% of Full 

semester semester semester 

charge charge charge 

Residential $100 50% of Full 

Fee* semester semester 

charge charge 

Comprehensive 20% of 50% of Full 

Fee semester semester semester 

charge charge charge 



Board Fee 



See Below 



Board Fee. Charges will be assessed on 
the basis of the number ot days in 
residence at the prevailing board rate 
for the semester in which the student 
withdraws. 

* For the purpose of determining with- 
drawal charges, the semester begins 
with the first day of classes. A residen- 
tial student withdrawing prior to the 
first day of classes will be charged the 
S100 room deposit and board at the 
prevailing daily rate. 



27 



Classification as a 
Virginia Student 

The following explanation of who is 
eligible to receive reduced tuition 
charges is a direct quote from the Code 
of Virginia, Section 23-7 as amended. It 
became effective July 1, 1977. 

For the purposes of this section, the 
domicile of an unemancipated minor 
may be the domicile of either parent; 
provided however, that if one parent 
has custody, the domicile of an uneman- 
cipated minor shall be the domicile of 
the parent having custody. If there is no 
surviving parent or the whereabouts of 
the parents are unknown, then the 
domicle of an unemancipated minor 
shall be the domicile of the legal 
guardian of such unemancipated minor 
if there are no circumstances indicating 
that such guardianship was created 
primarily for the purpose of conferring 
a Virginia domicile on such unemanci- 
pated minor. 

Except as provided in Section 23-7.2, no 
person in attendance at a State institu- 
tion of higher education shall be entitled 
to reduced tuition charges unless such 
person is and has been domiciled in 
Virginia for a period of at least one year 
immediately prior to the commence- 
ment of the term, semester or quarter 
for which any such reduced tuition 
charge is sought. 

A person who enrolls in any such 
institution while not domiciled in 
Virginia does not become entitled to 
reduced tuition charges by mere pres- 
ence of residence in Virginia. In order 
to become so entitled, any such person 
must establish that, one year before the 
date of alleged entitlement, he or she 



was at least eighteen years of age, or if 
under the age of eighteen, was an 
emancipated minor, and he had aban- 
doned his or her old domicile and was 
present in Virginia with the unqualified 
intention of remaining in Virginia for 
the period immediately after leaving 
such institution and indefinitely there- 
after. 

A person who is classified or classifiable 
at the date of his or her marriage as 
eligible to receive the privileges herein 
described, may receive or continue to 
receive such privileges until he or she 
abandons his or her Virginia domicile 
other than through any presumption of 
law attaching to the ceremony of 
marriage. 

A student who is not a member of the 
armed forces and who is not otherwise 
eligible for reduced tuition charges and 
whose spouse or parent is a member of 
the armed forces stationed in this State 
pursuant to military orders shall be 
entitled to reduced tuition charges if 
such spouse or either parent, for a 
period of at least one year immediately 
prior to and at the time of the 
commencement of the term, semester, 
or quarter for which reduced tuition 
charges are sought, has resided in 
Virginia, been employed full-time and 
paid personal income taxes to Virginia. 
Such student shall be eligible for 
reduced tuition through such parent 
under this section only if he or she is 
claimed as a dependent for Virginia and 
federal income tax purposes. Such 
student shall be entitled to reduced 
tuition charges so long as such parent or 
spouse continues to reside in Virginia, to 
be employed full-time and to pay 
personal income taxes to Virginia. 



Entitlement to reduced tuition charges 
must be established by convincing 
evidence and the burden of establishing 
entitlement shall be on the person 
claiming such entitlement. 

The State Council of Higher Education 
for Virginia shall, in conjunction with 
the Office of the Attorney General, seek 
to ensure that all State institutions of 
higher education will apply uniform 
criteria in determining eligibility for 
reduced tuition charges. 



Financial Aid 

Mary Washington College provides 
grants, loans, work assignments or 
combinations of these to students who 
demonstrate a need for financial assist- 
ance in meeting college expenses. 
Approximately 900 students share 
nearly 1.3 million dollars in financial 
assistance each year at Mary Wash- 
ington. 

Recipients of assistance are selected on 
the basis of financial need and academic 
achievement, except for recipients of 
the Regional Scholarship, which is based 
solely on merit. Financial assistance is 
provided without regard to race, color, 
religion, physical disability, national 
origin, political affiliation, marital 
status, sex, or age. In order to be 
eligible tor federal and state asssistance, 
students must be making satisfactory 
academic progress toward a Bachelor's 
degree. This means that the student 
must remain eligible to enroll with at 
least half-time status. Part-time stu- 
dents, registered for fewer than six 
hours per semester, are not eligible tor 
consideration. Where the financial 
needs of the applicants exceed available 
College resources, those applicants who 
demonstrate the greatest need will be 
given priority. 



28 



Within the last five years, the College 
has met successfully the financial need 
of its students as determined by the 
College Scholarship Service. 

The policy of the College is to provide 
greater grant resources to those students 
who have the greatest need. Listed 
below are some examples from the 
1979-80 session. It is also the College's 
policy to provide campus-based assist- 
ance not to exceed a student's direct 
educational costs which is defined as the 
sum total of room/board, tuition, fees 
and books (S2910 for the 1979-80 session). 

Demon- 
strated Award 
Need Loan Grant Work 
Student A S 500 $350 S 150 — 
Student B S1000 S210 $ 350 $440 
Student C $2000 $460 $1100 $440 
Student D $3000 $370 $2100 $440 

Awards, ranging from SI 00 to amounts 
covering tees, books, tuition, room 
and board are made for an academic 
session. The College reserves the right 
to adjust the aid awarded if a student's 
tinancial situation is changed by a 
resource or job received subsequently 
ixom outside sources, or by a material 
improvement m the finances ot the 
applicant or applicant's family. Finan- 
cial aid from Mary Washington College 
is not available to students who are 
studying abroad. A returning student 
must re-apply for financial assistance 
every year, and the amount of aid may 
vary depending upon the parents' 
financial circumstances, the amount of 
resources available to the College, and 
the student's academic record. 



All assistance awarded is based on 
demonstrated financial need as deter- 
mined by the College Scholarship 
Service (CSS) of which the College is a 
member. A dependent or independent 
student seeking such assistance must file 
with the CSS a completed copy of the 
Financial Aid Form (FAF). 

The FAF may be obtained by entering 
freshmen from their secondary schools 
and by upperclassmen from the Office 
of Admissions and Financial Aid. 
Transfer students are also required to 
have a financial aid transcript for- 
warded from their previous college. 

For incoming freshmen and transfer 
students, March 1 is the deadline for the 
College's receipt of the FAF. Therefore, 
an applicant should file this form with 
the CSS by February 1 but not earlier 
than January 1. Once the College has 
received an analysis of the FAF, it will 
send the student an Application for 
Financial Assistance which must be 
returned within two weeks. Award 
notifications are sent in mid-April to 
those students submitting timely appli- 
cations. 

A currently enrolled student must file 
both the College's Application for 
Assistance and the FAF by March 31. 
These forms are available in the Office 
of Admissions and Financial Aid. 

All financial aid applicants are required 
to apply for a Basic Grant as well as for 
the College's financial aid programs. 
This can be accomplished concurrently 
through the submission of one applica- 
tion called the FAF or VFAF. Virginia 
residents are asked to submit the VFAF 
to the State Council of Higher Educa- 
tion also in order to receive consid- 
eration for the College Scholarship 
Assistance Program grant. 



Students receiving financial assistance, 
with the exception of day and independ- 
ent students, are not allowed to register 
motor vehicles at Mary Washington 
College. The reason is that the expense 
incurred in operating a vehicle at 
college should be directed toward 
college costs and not toward an 
unnecessary incidental expense of a 
vehicle. Exceptions to this policy will 
be made only for reasons of health or 
academic necessity, but the student must 
receive prior written approval for the 
exception from the Financial Aid 
Otficer before registering the vehicle. 
Otherwise a standard deduction in 
assistance will be assessed. 

Students receiving financial assistance 
are expected to help themselves through 
part-time and summer employment and 
by borrowing against future earnings. 
Students receiving aid in 1980-81 are 
expected to contribute to college costs 
from 1980 summer earnings as follows: 
Freshmen and sophomores — S600; 
juniors and seniors — S700. Summer 
employment contributions are subject to 
revision annuallv. 



College Scholarships 
and Grants 

All scholarship and grant recipients 
must maintain at least good standing or 
better, as stipulated by the scholarship, 
and make normal progress toward a 
degree. 



29 



Regional Scholarship Program. Each 
spring, alumni committees select 25 
outstanding and promising entering 
freshmen students as Regional Scholars, 
20 of whom will come from Virginia's 
10 Congressional Districts and five from 
among out-of-state nominees. These 
scholars receive four-year $1,000 honor 
scholarships in recognition of superior 
academic preparation and potential for 
achievement. To retain this scholarship, 
a student must maintain a grade point 
average of 2.5 during the freshman year 
and 3.0 in subsequent years to be eligible 
for consideration. Students must be 
nominated by their high school princi- 
pals or guidance counselors before they 
may apply for their scholarships. 
Deadline for nomination is December 
15. An applicant for the scholarship 
must also be an applicant for admission. 
For further information, please write 
the Regional Scholarship Program, 
Office ot Admissions and Financial Aid. 

I. .ill. i Gresham Ball Scholarships. These 
scholarships were established by Mrs. 
Jessie Ball duPont in memory of her 
mother. An applicant must reside in one 
of the following counties of Virginia: 
King George, Westmoreland, Nor- 
thumberland, Richmond, Lancaster, 
Essex, or King and Queen. These 
scholarships may be renewed annually 
provided the recipient maintains good 
academic standing (a C or 2.0 overall 
average) and demonstrates financial 
need. 

Mary Washington College Anonymous 
Scholarships. These scholarships are 
awarded annually to students in need ot 
financial assistance, and who maintain 
satisfactory progress. 



State Scholarships. These scholarships 
are awarded by the College on the basis 
of demonstrated financial need to 
regular full-time students who are legal 
residents of Virginia. 

Chi Beta Phi Scholarships. This national 
honorary scientific fraternity awards 
annual scholarships to outstanding 
students majoring in science or mathe- 
matics. Preference is given to members 
of Chi Beta Phi. 

The Chandler Scholarship. Algernon B. 
Chandler, President of Mary Washing- 
ton from 1919 to 1928, bequeathed a sum 
to the College. The proceeds are used 
toward the education of a junior or 
senior selected on the basis o( scholar- 
ship and need. 

The Michael Houston Memorial Fund. 

Established in 1973 in memory of 
Michael Houston, the first Vice Presi- 
dent of the College and Associate 
Professor of History, scholarships are 
awarded to students whose parents are 
among the classified personnel of the 
College. 

The Thomas Howard and Elizabeth 
Merchant Tardy Endowment Fund. This 
tund was established in 1962 by Mrs. Ida 
Elizabeth Tardy and his wife, Mary M. 
Tardy, and from William H. Merchant 
and his wife, Belle Ashby Merchant. 

Jeannine Mary Pfeifle Scholarship. In 

memory of Jeannine Mary Pfeifle, class 
of 1979, this $500 scholarship is awarded 
each year by a College selection 
committee to a rising senior who is a 
U.S. citizen. Specifically and in des- 
cending order of priority, the recipient 
shall be a daughter of a U.S. Marine 
serviceman, daughter of a U.S. Navy 
serviceman, the son of a U.S. Marine 
serviceman or the son of a U.S. Navy 
serviceman. 



Carrol H. Quenzel Memorial Scholarship 
Fund. Established in memory of Dr. 
Carrol H. Quenzel, former Mary 
Washington Librarian and Professor of 
History, these annual scholarships are 
awarded to deserving junior and senior 
students. Preference is given first to 
those who worked in the previous 
semester or who are working in the 
current semester in the Library, and 
next, to students majoring in history. 

Lynn Ruby Memorial Scholarship. Es- 
tablished in memory of Lynn Ruby '68, 
this award is available first to graduates 
ot Woodbridge Senior High School, 
Woodbridge, Virginia, and then to 
residents of the State of Ohio. 

Minnie Rob Phaup Memorial Scholar- 
ship. Established in memory of Minnie 
Rob Phaup, former member of the Mary 
Washington College faculty, this 
scholarship may be awarded to an out- 
standing junior or senior in psychology 
or for graduate study in psychology. 

Maurine Arnott Scholarship. This scho- 
larship was established by a bequest 
from Maurine Arnott to aid worthy and 
needy students, with preference given 
to female students. 

Martin Luther King Memorial Scholar- 
ship. Established by members ot the 
College community following the 
assassination of Dr. King, this scholar- 
ship is awarded to a financially needy 
student selected by the Office of 
Admissions and Financial Aid. 

Albert R. Klein Memorial Scholarship. 

This scholarship was established in 
memory ot Dr. Albert R. Klein, former 
Chairman ot the Department ot Drama- 
tic Arts and Speech. Preference is given 
to students pursuing a major or con- 
centration in drama or speech. 



Federal and State Grants 

Basic Educational Opporniniry Grant. 



Tie 



of a Basic Grant is at 

~ ■ 

V/mise ^ .car. a 5a = : 



ieedv 



cii. resources 
-am: 3ZOG 



— <s" 



; ;i : :.s an; 



an FAF to the CSS. 

Supplementary Educational Opportunity 



S_.'. 



The Virg inia College Scholarship Assist- 
ance Program Grant. - ie \ irmrua 



monwealth's college-age students i 

gj-.r.mg access :: higher educaren. 
VrAr arr.icareus usnadv — us: re 
r.: da:er man N'arcd 51 .vim :he >: 
dzur.r:. :: Hinder Educaren :er 



^rdege's d:f :e ::' A;-;; 

rmaneia. Aid 



Loans 

M~VTC Srudent Aid Discretionary Loan 
Fund. rsiar.isnec m lr~l rv :.-_e Car 



u; Office :f fie Oean ef Acmissicrcs 
in rmar.na. Arc :rr rcrrier imrrma- 
:.:r. :i :iese srri_. uneres:-::ee. srerr- 

The National Direct Srudent Loan Pro- 
gram, runes :rr mis rrc^ram. ire 
:::v:ir; ;mrv :v :ie reeera- ::.;-- 
men: ar.r :ie C:..eee A rcrrm-ver —us: 
cam." a: .eas: six creed: rrurs rer 
sen es:er. reec me am ecu: awaroed. re 
rarar.e r: — imrammg sa::s:ar:cr.- 
acacerr.ic rrc^ress. =.11 re a. circer :: 

Tie ameuu: r: earn .car. is oe:ermmer 
rv me Financial Aid Officer urn 
revie.v c: me rmarcia. An ::~. 

No interest on the loan will accrue to 

:ue ~^~. ~. c: me rerammei: re:.:c 

which begins rune months :::~ the date 
the borrower ceases :c cany a: .east 
six credit hours re: semester. Interest 
:r.erea::e: :s ran a: me ra:e :: :i:ee 
rerceu: armuadv cu die unpaid evince. 



The Guaranteed Srudent Loan Program. 
Tie d-uarau:eec Srcder: Lean Program. 
a_e.vs eugrme 57ucen:s re rerrew runs 
:: rr.ee: redege exrerses a: an imeres: 
ra:e .ever fnan :da: :rr m:s: cenven- 
:::.;. ccmm.ercia. raux .cans Tne 

mreres: :r :ie .can as .cnc as me 
smuen: is enrcded a: ,eas: dil:-nrne. 
Tie na:r rurrese :: :ne Guaran:eed 



ixinurn a .ending 



-r 



m mes: cases :i: 
ins::ru::ci tu a..c".v a sreceu: : 
____.... :5 52.5O! rer acacemic v 
re e.ieir.e a sruden: rr.us: re a I 
5:a:es nancnad re eurrdeo in rr 
enrcd in six cr mere creci: ecu: 
-.vcrx anu re m ecru acauerruc s: 
Arrdcar.cn ::: mese .cans is m= 
directly with the lending insure 



Virginia Education Loan Authority. 
Created by the State of Virginia to 

rrcvice .cans :: e.i^r.e sreeerrs wf: 
are unar.e :: secure duaraneec 5 racer: 
leans ::rm rr.vare .eueers leaus are 
made directly to the student uneres:- 
:ree as .cn^ as me sruceri mamiams a: 
.eas: nilr-rme scares Rerav—.en: :: :ne 



-.1; 



31 



Student Employment 

The College offers many opportunities 
for part-time employment. Demon- 
strated need and the ability to perform 
the job are primary factors in awarding 
an assignment. It is not necessary to 
demonstrate financial need to be eligible 
for campus employment. Most posi- 
tions, which include those in the 
Library, residence halls, laboratories, 
dining hall and faculty offices, pay 
about $750 to $950 for the nine-month 
sessions. Inquiries should be directed to 
the Office of Admissions and Financial 
Aid, Box 1098, College Station, 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401. The 
office is located in Room 303, George 
Washington Hall. Application for 
student employment should be made by 
March 31. 

College Work-Study Program. Employ- 
ment is available through this program 
to qualified full-time students and those 
carrying at least six credit hours per 
semester, who have demonstrated 
financial need. Students usually work 
from 10 to 15 hours per week either in 
on-campus or off-campus programs. 
Opportunities are also available for full- 
time summer employment in public or 
other non-profit organizations through- 
out the State. Net earnings from this 
program, called The Virginia Program, 
are to be used in meeting college 
expenses. CWS resources are awarded 
to students who demonstrate the grea- 
test financial need. Address inquiries 
to the Office of Admissions and Finan- 
cial Aid, Box 1098, College Station, 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401. The 
office is located in Room 303, George 
Washington Hall. 



Special Forms of 
Assistance 

Special funds, not administered by the 
Office of Admissions and Financial Aid, 
are available to assist students with their 
academic pursuits as follows. 

Annie Fleming Smith Scholarship Fund. 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. 
Elsie Ball Bowley in memory of Mrs. 
Annie Fleming Smith whose efforts 
made possible the preservation of 
Kenmore, the home of George Wash- 
ington's sister. The recipient must 
devote to the Kenmore Association as 
much time and service as the authorities 
of Mary Washington prescribe. In 
awarding this scholarship, primary 
consideration is given to students from 
the Virginia Northern Neck, consisting 
of King George, Westmoreland, Rich- 
mond, Lancaster and Northumberland 
counties. Inquiries should be addressed 
to the Dean of the College. 

Lt. General Albert J. Bowley Scholarship 
Fund. This scholarship was established 
by Mrs. Elsie Ball Bowley in memory of 
her husband, Lt. General Albert J. 
Bowley, a distinguished officer of the 
United States Army. The recipient is to 
devote to the James Monroe Memorial 
Library as much time and service as the 
authorities of Mary Washington Col- 
lege prescribe. Consideration is first 
given to juniors and seniors who are 
daughters of service personnel, and then 
to students from foreign countries 
(preferably Latin Americans), or to 
upper-classmen whose major interests 
and work lie in the fields of history or 
political science. Inquiries should be 
addressed to the Dean of the College. 



Aurelia B. Walford Scholarships in 
Music. Established by the will of Mrs. 
Walford, these scholarships are 
awarded annually to entering students 
who intend to major in music. Awards 
are made on the basis of academic merit 
and performance skills. 

J. Binford Walford Scholarships in 
Architecture. Established by the will of 
Mrs. Aurelia B. Walford, these scholar- 
ships are awarded annually to entering 
students who have expressed career 
interests in architecture and/or archi- 
tecture related studies. Awards are 
based on academic merit and an 
intention to pursue architectural studies. 



Courses of Study 



Course titles and 
numbers are given in 
bold-face type, fol- 
lowed in parentheses 
by the number of 
semester credit hours. At the 
right-hand margin is a capital 
letter in parentheses indicating 
how the course may be scored 
toward degree requirements: (a) 

— Literature; (H) — Humani- 
ties; (S) — Social Science: (N/M) 

— Natural Science and Mathe- 
matics. If no designating letter in 
parentheses appears, the course 
may usually count only toward 
electives or diversificaton. 

In some course listings informa- 
tion is given concerning the vear 
or semester during which the 
course is taught. Since the course 
ottering varies trom semester to 
semester, the student should 
consult the schedule ot courses. 
issued prior to the beginning ot 
each semester, tor specific semes- 
ter otterings. The schedule ot 
courses also gives the number of 
class meetmgs per week, the time 
and place ot classes, and the name 
ot the instructor. Before enroll- 
ing in a course the student should 
check the listed prerequisites. 

Course ottermgs are divided into 
lower level (100 and 200) and 
upper level (300 and 400). 
Courses numbered 100 through 
199 are usually regarded as 
elementary or introductory. 
Courses numbered 200 through 



299 usually assume prior studv or 
some competence in the subject, 
either in secondary school or in 
college. Courses numbered 300 
through 498 are advanced courses 
and usually assume either pre- 
vious course work or special 
competence in the field. Courses 
numbered 499 are interships. 

Continuous courses, where two 
semesters are listed in sequence. 
are ot three tvpes: 

if the two semesters are linked 
with a hyphen, the course is a 
year course tor which no credit 
toward graduation is given tor 
the first semester until the second 
semester is successfully com- 
pleted: 

if the two semesters are not 
hyphenated but the course des- 
cription says "only in sequence." 
the material covered in the 
second semester depends upon 
the first semester. The two 
semesters must be taken in 
sequence, but credit for the first 
semester is not contingent upon 
completion ot the second semes- 
ter: 

it the two semesters are neither 
hyphenated nor designated only 
in sequence, one or both semes- 
ters may be taken in any order. 

Individual study courses offer 
learning opportunities in areas or 
subjects not covered by regular 
courses. 



American Studies 

Department of History and American Studies: 
Mr. Thomas. Career Adviser 

The American Studies program is inter- 
disciplinary in nature, designed to provide 
students with a flexible, multi-faceted 
approach to the study ot American society. 
Since the major provides much latitude 
in the selection of courses, students are 
encouraged to work closely with the 
Career Adviser in choosing courses which 
will form a cohesive program. 

The American Studies seminars, ordinarilv 
taken in the junior and senior years, 
help students to integrate courses in the 
various areas into a meaningful under- 
standing of American culture. While the 
seminars range broadly across American 
history, their emphasis is upon the late 
19th and 20th centuries, with the aim of 
identifying and analyzing major charac- 
teristics of modem technological society, 
clarifying its values and assumptions, and 
relating the present to the past and future. 
The seminar method of instruction is 
central to the program, and otters each 
student ample opportunity to participate 
fully in the learning process. 

The American Studies major provides 
excellent preparation tor students inter- 
ested in law, journalism and communica- 
tions, library science, museum work, 
teaching, and many areas ot public service. 



Requirements tor the Major 



:- :-:: 



Core Courses: - r"C£~ 5".-;; 
401.402. 

In Other Subjects: 24 credits from five main 
areas: American history. American literature 
and philosoprn - m er can social sciences. 
American fine arts, and non-American 
civilization; no more than 6 credits in any 
one area: courses to be selected in consul- 
tation with Career Adviser. 

301 — Issues in Contemporary 
American Culture (3) 5 

in American culture. Specific issues will 
vary from year to year. 



33 



302 — The Fine Arts in America 

(3) (H) 

Examples of modern music, dance, and 
drama are studied to illustrate the role of fine 
arts in American culture. 

401 — Mass Media and American 
Culture (3) (S) 

A study of the uses and influences of mass 
media in shaping social values. Emphasis 
on television and journalism. 

402 — Impact of Darwin and Freud 
on American Thought (3) (S) 

An examination of the influences of social 
Darwinism and psychoanalytic theory on 
20th century American thought. 

491 - Individual Study (3) (S) 

Directed individual research on problems in 
American studies, as approved by the 
Career Adviser. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Career Adviser. 
Credits variable. 



Anthropology 



Department of Anthropology, Geography and 
Sociology: Miss Williamson, Career Adviser 

Courses in anthropology are designed 
to acquaint students with the varieties of 
human culture and society, and with the 
different ways in which the study of man 
can be approached: physical, archaeologi- 
cal, sociocultural, and linguistic. Anthro- 
pology 101 is prerequisite for all other 
courses except 102 and 201, or by 
permission of the instructor. 

101 — Introduction to Cultural and 
Social Anthropology (3) (S) 

How primitive peoples organize their worlds. 
Examination of various basic concepts in a 
number of different societies. Prerequisite 
for all upper-level courses except by per- 
mission of the instructor. 



102 — Introduction to Physical 
Anthropology and Archaeology 

(3) (S) 

Physical: primatology, genetics, human 
evolution, and human varieties. Archaeology: 
objectives and techniques; the course of 
cultural evolution to urbanized life 

201 — Ethnography of North 
American Indians (3) (S) 

Various Indian societies from culture areas 
of the Arctic, Sub-Arctic, Northwest Coast, 
Southwest, Plains, and Eastern North 
America; related theoretical problems. 



202 — Ethnography of South 
Pacific Peoples (3) 



(S) 



Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. Societies 
and cultures from the South Pacific, Philip- 
pines, Melanesia (including New Guinea), 
Micronesia, and Polynesia (including New 
Zealand). 

301 — History of Culture Theory 

(3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. Examination 
of theories of the analysis of culture from 
the beginnings of anthropological thought 
until the present. Alternate years; offered 
Fall 1981. 

312 — Women in Anthropology 

(3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. Study of 
women both as anthropologists and as 
objects of anthropological investigation in 
a number of different social contexts. 



322 — Symbols and 
Communications (3) 



(S) 



Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. How anthro- 
pology studies the communications used by 
society and culture (symbols, signs, signals) 
with emphasis on symbols: what they are 
and what forms they take. Alternate years; 
offered Fall 1980. 

491, 492 — Individual Study and 
Research (3, 3) (S) 

Individual work under the guidance of the 
instructor. By permission of the instructor. 

499 — Internship (S) 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Art 

Department of Art; Mr Dreiss, Career Adviser 
for Art History; Mr. DiBella. Career Adviser 
for Studio Art 

To foster the study and practice of the fine 
arts, the Art Department offers traditional 
academic majors in studio art and the 
history of art. 

The purpose of the studio art major is to 
teach fundamental skills, increase aesthetic 
sensibilities, and further the student's 
individual development in the following 
media: drawing, painting, photography, 
pottery, printmaking and sculpture. The 
art history major explores in chronological 
sequence the entire span of Western art 
and its contribution to our cultural 
heritage. In addition to slide lectures and 
the availability of an exceptional art 
library, students regularly take faculty- 
supervised tours to museums in Wash- 
ington, D.C., Baltimore, and Richmond. 
An internship program provides oppor- 
tunities for work experience prior to 
graduation. 

There are career opportunities for art 
majors in graduate studies, the fine arts, 
museum and slide curatorships, historic 
preservation, teaching, conservation and 
restoration, editing, gallery work, and 
medical and technical illustration. 

ART HISTORY 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 114, 1 15; 30 additional 
credits in Art History courses including at 
least one 400-level research-oriented 
course; one course from each of the follow- 
ing chronological periods: classical, medie- 
val, renaissance, baroque and modern 

Recommended: French and German are 
recommended for students interested in 
graduate work. 

114,115 — Introduction to the 
History of Art (3, 3) 

Survey of Western architecture, sculpture, 
and painting Art 114. prehistoric to 1400 
Art 115. 1400 to the present. May be taken 
only in sequence. 



34 



220 — History of Graphics (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. The history of 
European prints and printmaking from the 
15th century to the present. Alternate 
years; offered Fall 1980. 

310 -Greek Art (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 1 14. Development of Greek 
art from the early Iron Age through the 
Geometric, Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic 
periods. 

311 — Roman Art (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 1 14. Roman art from the 
Italo-Etruscan period to the end of the 
Roman Empire. 

320 — Byzantine and Early 
Medieval Art (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 1 14. Development of 
Christian art in the Eastern and Western 
Empires through the first Golden Age of 
Byzantine art and the reign of Charlemagne 
to the year 1000. Alternate years; offered 
Fall 1980. 

321 — Medieval Art in France and 
England, 1 000 to 1 400 (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 1 14. Sources and formula- 
tion of medieval art in northern Europe 
through the Gothic style in architecture, 
sculpture, and manuscript illumination. 
Alternate years; offered Spring 1981. 

322 — Medieval Art in Byzantium 
and Italy, 1 000 to 1 400 (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 1 14. The second Golden 
Age of Byzantine art; the painting, sculp- 
ture, and architecture of the Italian Proto- 
Renaissance. Alternate years; offered Fall 
1981. 

330 — Northern European Art, 
1400 to 1600(3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Painting in the 
Lowlands, France, and Germany from the 
late medieval period through the 16th 
century. Alternate years; offered Fall 1981. 

331 — Italian Renaissance Painting 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Painting of the 
Italian Renaissance; its origins in the social 
and intellectual climate of the period. Alter- 
nate years; offered Spring 1982. 



332 — Italian Renaissance Archi- 
tecture and Sculpture (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Major works of 
architecture and sculpture in Renaissance 
Italy including the historic and theoretical 
bases for these arts. Alternate years; offered 
Fall 1980. 

340 — Northern Baroque Art (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. 17th century 
art in the north of Europe with emphasis 
on Rubens, Rembrandt, landscape painting, 
Versailles. Offered alternate years. 

341 — Italian Baroque Art (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 1 1 4, 1 1 5. Painting, 
architecture, and sculpture of 17th century 
Italy; Caravaggio, Bernini, Borromini, the 
Baroque ceiling. Alternate years; offered 
Spring 1981. 

342 — Eighteenth Century Art 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Concentration 
on the French Rococo, its influence on 
Continental and British art and its evolution 
into Neoclassicism. Offered alternate years. 

343 — Georgian Art (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. British art and 
aesthetics; portraiture, landscape painting 
and gardening; Palladianism, Britain as a 
font of Romanticism. Offered alternate years. 

350 — Nineteenth Century Art 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Emphasis on 
French painting and sculpture through 
Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, 
Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. 

351 — Twentieth Century Art 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Major movements 
in modern art. 

352 — American Art (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. A review of 
American painting, sculpture, and architec- 
ture with emphasis on the 19th and 20th 
centuries. Alternate years; offered Spring 
1981. 



353 — Modern Architecture (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Form, style, and 
technology as related to historical sources 
and selected individuals. Alternate years; 
offered; Spring 1981. 

360 — Architecture of Colonial 
America (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Emergence of 
an indigenous American architecture with 
emphasis on regional and cultural influences, 
to 1800; will not fulfill any art history major 
area requirements. Alternate years; offered 
Fall 1980. 

470 — Special Studies in Art 
History (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114, 115. Concentration 
in seminar format on an individual artist, 
specific problem, a limited time period, or 
an iconographic theme; for art history majors 
and other qualified students. 

491, 492 - Individual Study in Art 
History (3, 3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Art 114 and 115 and at least 
three chronological area courses in the 
major; for art history majors. Faculty approval 
of research project; oral presentation and 
major paper. 

499 — Art History Internship (H) 

Supervised off-campus experience devel- 
oped in consultation with the art history 
faculty. Credits variable. 

STUDIO ART 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 1 01 , 1 02; 24 additional 
credits in Studio Art courses of which at 
least 1 2 must be at the 300-400 level; 
at least one course in each of the 
following media: painting, pottery, print- 
making, and sculpture. 

In Other Subjects: Art History: 12 credits in 
Art History courses including 114, 115. 

101 — Two-Dimensional Design 

(3) (H) 

Basic study of design elements (line, shape, 
texture, value, color) used in visual com- 
munication, both figurative and non- 
figurative. 



35 



102 — Three-Dimensional Design 

(3) (H) 

Experiments in the use of materials and 
elements of design related to the develop- 
ment of three-dimensional structures. 



111,112 — Pottery and 
Handbuilding (3, 3) 



(H) 



Practice in the use of the pottery wheel, 
exploration of forms and textures attainable 
through wheel and hand-building processes. 

1 70 — Beginning Painting and 
Drawing (3) (H) 

Basic methods and techniques of realistic 
and abstract art; investigation of light and 
dark color, line, composition, and design. 
(May not be used to satisfy studio art major 
requirement in painting.) 

1 80 — Silkscreen (3) (H) 

Introduction to serigraphic techniques and 
materials in a fine art mode. (May not be 
used to satisfy studio art major requirements 
in painting or printmaking.) 

211,212 — Life Drawing* (3, 3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 101. Various approaches 
to drawing the human body and other 
organic figurative and non-figurative imagery. 

221, 222 — Drawing and 
Composition* (3, 3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 101. Drawing from life. 
Abstract and figurative composition in 
various media. 

231, 232 — Beginning Sculpture* 

(3,3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 101 and 102. Study and 
construction of volume and mass using 
figurative and non-figurative subject matter 
in a variety of plastic and carving media 
including plaster modelling and casting. 

311,312 — Advanced Pottery* 

(3,3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 1 1 1 or 112. Further explora- 
tion of wheel-thrown forms, hand-building 
processes, and sculpture; experiments with 
glazing and firing. 

321 — Fundamentals of 
Printmaking* (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: one year of drawing. Processes 
involved in making multiple images; intaglios, 
collagraphs, reliefs. 



322 — Advanced Printmaking* 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 321. Lithography and further 
exploration of intaglios, collagraphs, and 
reliefs. 

331 — Marble Carving* (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 231 or 232. Figurative and 
conceptual approaches to form using marble 
as the basic carving medium 

332 — Woodcarving* (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 231 or 232. Figurative and 
conceptual approaches using hardwoods 
such as cherry, walnut, oak, or maple as 
the basic carving medium. 

343 — Principles of Painting* 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: one year of drawing. Introduc- 
tion of techniques and materials in the study 
of pictorial organization. 

344 — Advanced Painting* 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Art 343 or permission of 
instructor. Further development in the prob- 
lems, concepts, and techniques of painting. 

353 — Photography (3) (H) 

Orientation in darkroom techniques, use of 
the camera, and other equipment; emphasis 
on photography as a fine art. By permission 
of instructor. 

470 — Special Studies in Studio 

Art (3) (H) 

Special courses in an area of studio art 
selected by the studio faculty after consulta- 
tion with the students. Advanced students 
only. 

495, 496 — Individual Study in 
Studio Art (3, 3) (H) 

Independent work under the supervision 
of a member of the studio art faculty. By 
permission of instructor. 

499 — Internship (H) 

Supervised off-campus experience devel- 
oped in consultation with the studio art 
faculty. Credits variable 

'Prerequisites can be waived at the discretion 
of the instructor. 



Biol 



ogy 



Department of Biological Sciences; Miss 
Johnson, Career Adviser 

The Department strives to create an 
atmosphere in which students can develop 
a strong background in the sciences and 
the intellectual independence to build on 
that foundation. Three major programs, 
Biology, Environmental Earth Sciences, 
and Medical Technology are offered. The 
courses offered by the department and 
supporting disciplines provide such 
diversity that a number of areas of 
concentration are offered within the major 
programs. 

Laboratory work enables the student to 
learn techniques and obtain data which 
support theories explored in lecture. 
Equipment and facilities, all of which 
are for student use, include a scanning, 
recording spectrophotometer, an ultra- 
centrifuge, rerpirometers, research-grade 
microscopes, tissue culture facilities, a 
radioisotope laboratory, physiographs, a 
phytotron, and an aquatic studies labora- 
tory. Equipment for ecological studies 
in terrestrial, fresh water and marine 
environments includes live animal traps, 
plankton and insect nets, seines, a small 
fleet of boats including one equipped for 
trawling and dredging and fresh and salt 
water aquaria. Collections of microscope 
slides, skeletons, preserved animals and 
an herbarium collection of pressed plants 
are also on hand. 

Courses numbered 481 and 491 offer 
opportunities to pursue studies beyond 
the scope of listed courses. This may 
include library research and field and 
laboratory investigation. These courses 
may be used for honors. Experience and 
knowledge gained outside the College, 
with proper supervision, may be used 
for academic credit under 499 — 
Internship. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 28 credits in Biology 
courses beyond 121-122. including 342 or 
441, 442, and 450. 

In Other Subjects: Chemistry, 8 cr. hr. 



36 



Recommended: Biology 231 and 321 . 

121 — Biological Concepts I 

(4) (N/M) 

An introduction to biological principles as 
they apply to plants and animals. Laboratory. 

122 — Biological Concepts II 

(4) (N/M) 

Survey of the plant and animal kingdoms 
with emphasis on morphology and taxonomy; 
survey of the human organ systems. 
Laboratory. 

202 — Heredity and Evolution 

(3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. Principles of 
heredity, their application to evolutionary 
theory, and their social implications. For 
non-majors only, except by permission of 
Chairperson. Laboratory. 

221 — Anatomy of the Chordates 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121: recommended: 
Biology 122. A comparative study of the 
major systems of representative chordates. 
Laboratory. 

231 — Botany (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122. Survey of the 
plant kingdom with emphasis on morpho- 
genetic description, life histories, and 
evolutionary relationships. Laboratory. 

250 — Bioethics (2) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. Selected 
topics considered from the stand- 
point of their biological conse- 
quences and ethical implications 
for man. 

251 S — History of Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122. Chronological 
development of selected biological theories 
and their impact on contemporary biology. 

252 — General Ecology (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. A study of the 
relationships of plants and animals to their 
environment and the maintenance of balance 
in nature. For non-majors except by per- 
mission of chairperson. Spring 1982. 



302 — Embryology of the 
Chordates (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121; recommended: 
Biology 122, 221. The development of repre- 
sentative chordates. Laboratory. 

31 1 — Plant Ecology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122. Ecological 
principles as applied to plants including 
major biomes, plant succession, competition, 
environmental parameters, and methods of 
data collection and evaluation. Laboratory. 
Fall 1982. 

31 2 — Plant Physiology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122, Experimental 
and theoretical treatment of the functional 
mechanisms in plants. Laboratory. Fall 1981. 

321 — Invertebrate Zoology 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122. Survey of 
invertebrate phyla emphasizing structural 
characteristics, life histories and evolutionary 
relationships. Laboratory. 

322 — Animal Ecology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122, and 
Chemistry, 8 cr. hr. The relationship between 
animals and their environment. Field and 
laboratory studies include observations of 
marine, fresh water, and terrestrial animals. 
Laboratory. 

323S — Entomology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121 or equivalent. 
Introduction to structure, function and 
ecology of insects. Students prepare insect 
collections. Laboratory. 

331 — Histology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122. The prepa- 
ration and microscopic examination of 
animal tissues. Study of the relationship 
between function and structure of tissues 
and their cells. Laboratory. Spring 1981. 

342 — Human Genetics (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. Application to the 
human of the principles of heredity. 
Laboratory. 



351 — Laboratory Techniques 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122, and 
Chemistry, 8 cr. hr. Introduces students to 
instrumentation used in physiological 
experiments. The scientific method and 
experimental design are discussed and used. 

352S — Marine Ecology (6) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122, and 
Chemistry, 8 cr. hr. A general introduction to 
the marine environment with emphasis on 
the biological, chemical and physical aspects 
of various marine communities. Summer 
1981. 

360 — Cellular Physiology 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122 and Chem- 
istry, 8 cr. hr. Recommended: Organic 
Chemistry. Principles of general and cellular 
physiology. Laboratory. 

361 — Comparative Physiology 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122 and Chem- 
istry, 8 cr. hr. A comparative study of 
physiological systems in animals. Laboratory. 
Spring 1981 

362 — Comparative Endocrinology 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122 and Chem- 
istry, 8 cr. hr. A comparative study of the 
endocrine mechanisms in vertebrates and 
invertebrates. Laboratory. Spring 1982. 

363 — Environmental Physiology 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122, and 
Chemistry, 8 cr. hr. Experimental and 
theoretical treatment of the role of 
environmental factors in the physiology of 
organisms. Spring 1981. 

371 — Microbiology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, Chemistry, 8 cr. 
hr. Emphasis is placed on bacteria, their 
morphology, physiology, nutrition, and 
ecology. Laboratory. 

372 - Parasitology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. The structure, 
life histories, and host relationships of 
invertebrate parasitic forms. Laboratory. 



37 



382, 383 — Human Anatomy and 
Physiology (4, 4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. The structure and 
function of the human at cell, tissue and 
organ system levels of organization. 
Laboratory. 

391 — Immunology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122, and 
Chemistry, 8 cr, hr. Introduction to the 
principles and theories of host defense with 
emphasis on antibody production, 
characterization and identification. 
Laboratory. 

441 — Genetics (5) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122. The struc- 
ture, function and transmission of genetic 
material. Laboratory. Open only to majors 
except by permission of Chairperson. 

442 — Evolution (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, 122. Recom- 
mended for senior level students. The history 
and development of modern evolutionary 
thought. Open only to ma|ors, except by 
permission of Chairperson. 

450 — Seminar (1) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Biology 121, 122. Readings, 
reports and group discussions on topics of 
historic and current biological interest. Open 
only to majors. 

481 — Readings in the 

Biological Sciences (2) (N/M) 

Readings in biological literature selected 
by the student. The student is guided by a 
staff member. Open to |unior and senior 
majors by permission of Department. 

491 — Special Problems in 
Biology (3)or (4 for honors) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Biology 481. Individual labora- 
tory or field investigation supervised by a 
staff member. Open to junior and senior 
majors with permission of Department 

499 — Internship 

Prerequisite: junior or senior major in good 
academic standing with appropriate back- 
ground. Supervised off-campus experience, 
developed in consultation with the depart- 
ment. Credits variable. 



Business Administration 

Department of Economics, Business and 
Public Affairs; Mr. Czarsty, Career Adviser 

The degree in Business Administration is 
designed to provide an understanding of 
the variety of approaches to and the 
complexities of the managerial process 
in an ever-changing society, both within 
and outside the business firm. 

The program aims to develop both specific 
analytical skills and a broad intellectual 
outlook in students who wish to combine 
their liberal arts education with course 
work of intellectual substance which will 
provide a background for an immediate 
career in business or for graduate study. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 18 credits in Business 
Administration courses including 231, 232, 
300, 310, 380, 490. 

In Other Subjects: Economics 201 , 202, 
310, 361; Statistics 200. 

Recommended: Economics 321, 442; Speech 
300 or equivalent. 

231, 232 — Principles of 
Accounting (3,3) 

Fundamental accounting principles and 
practices involved in the recording and 
interpretation of accounting data. Only in 
sequence. 

300 — Principles of Management 

(3) 

The fundamentals of management and 
organization for business operations. 
Emphasis is placed on the theory of 
management, authority and responsibility, 
organization principles, the managerial job, 
direction and leadership, decision making, 
policy formation, planning and control. 

301 — Organization Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 300. Formal and informal 
organizational structure; variables affecting 
the administration of complex organizations. 

302 — Production Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 300. Managerial proce- 
dures in the production process; planning, 
control, standards, and reports 



310 — Principles of Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202 and BUAD 
231, 232. The place of marketing in the 
economic system together with the policies 
and practices of marketing institutions. 
Subjects considered include: marketing 
functions, marketing organization, marketing 
research, merchandising, channels of distri- 
bution, transportation and social regulation 
of marketing. 

31 1 — Consumer Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 310. Analysis of con- 
sumer behavior and theories of consumer 
choice; techniques and problems in 
predicting consumer behavior 

312 — Retail Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 310. The organization, 
operation, and management of retail estab- 
lishments; inventory methods, retail buying 
and selling. 

331, 332 — Intermediate 
Accounting (3, 3) 

More advanced principles of accounting. 
Only in sequence. 

333 — Cost/Managerial 
Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 231, 232 or permission 
of instructor. Fundamental principles and 
procedures of the analysis of cost systems, 
cost concepts and behavior, performance 
measurement, and analytical uses of 
accounting data for administrative decisions. 

341 — Personnel Administration 

(3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 300. An analysis of the 
problems and practices in personnel 
management; selection, placement, evalua- 
tion, promotion, and termination 

380 — Business Law (3) 

A survey, through the case method ap- 
proach, of the legal principles and rationale 
underlying the rights and obligations of 
business relationships. The Uniform Com- 
mercial Code is emphasized. 

403 — Organizational Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 300 Dynamics of 
organizational behavior in business, inter- 
preted from a behavioral science perspec- 
tive. 



38 



413 — Marketing Research (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 310. Research in 
marketing as a tool for the identification, 
collection, and analysis of information 
relevant to decision-making by the marketing 
executive. 

434 — Federal Taxation (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 231, 232 or permission 
of instructor. An examination of the federal 
tax structure and the application of tax 
principles to the solutions of problems. 

442 — Labor-Management 
Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: BUAD 341. A survey of collec- 
tive bargaining process, the labor contract, 
unionism, impact of labor-management 
relations on wages, the legal context of 
labor-management relations and the respon- 
sibilities of unions and management. 

490 — Business Policy (3) 

A senior-level course which is the capstone 
of the student's study of business administra- 
tion. Cases concerning administrative 
management present problems involving the 
integration of departmental policies into 
administrative decisions. 

491 — Individual Study in Business 
Administration 

Directed individual research on an approved 
problem in business administration. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Chemistry 



Department of Chemistry and Geology; 
Mr. Mahoney, Career Adviser 

The chemistry program offers a modern 
curriculum designed for the student plan- 
ning on graduate, medical or dental school 
(See Pre-Medical Program), employment 
in industrial chemistry, secondary school 
teaching, or for the student desiring to 
study chemistry within the general frame- 
work of a liberal arts and science educa- 
tion. In addition, there are courses which 
offer considerable opportunities for 
students in related fields such as biology, 



the health sciences and environmental 
earth science. By supplementing the 
chemistry major with course offerings in 
related fields, students may acquire a 
career-focused grouping, e.g., chemistry- 
mathematics/computer science for 
chemical engineering and industrial 
chemistry; chemistry/economics or business 
administration for industrial chemistry; 
chemistry-biology for health sciences; 
chemistry-geology/environmental earth 
science for positions involving energy 
or environmental research. 

The Department of Chemistry and 
Geology has well-equipped laboratories to 
support and reinforce classroom instruc- 
tion. Facilities include ultraviolet, visible, 
infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, 
atomic absorption and mass spectrometers, 
and gas chromatographs. Complete emis- 
sion spectrographic and x-ray laboratories 
and computer facilities are also available. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 31 credits in Chemistry 
courses beyond 111, 112, including 211, 
212, 252, 383, 384, 385, 423, 451, 452 and 
one other upper-level course. 

In Other Subjects: Mathematics 221; Physics 
201, 202. 

1 05, 1 06 — Introductory 
Chemistry (4, 4) (N/M) 

An overview of the principles of chemistry 
with emphasis on practical applications. 
Laboratory. Only in sequence. 

111,112 — General Chemistry 

(4,4) (N/M) 

Introduction to the fundamental principles of 
chemistry and the more important elements 
and their compounds. Laboratory. Only in 
sequence. 

205 — Essentials of Organic 
Chemistry (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 112 or 106. A 
general survey of carbon compounds in- 
cluding the study of their structure and 
reactivity. Laboratory. 



211,212 — Organic Chemistry 

(4,4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 112. Structural theory 
and reactivity of carbon compounds. 
Laboratory. 

252 — Analytical Chemistry 

(4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 112, or 106, and 
Math 1 1 1 or equivalent. Theory and 
techniques of analytical chemistry including 
introductory instrumental methods of analysis 
Laboratory. 

317, 318 — Biochemistry 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. The application 
of chemical principles to the study and 
understanding of the living state. 

319, 320 — Biochemistry 
Laboratory (1, 1) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, 252. Corequi- 
sites: Chemistry 317, 318. Selected research 
techniques involving the chemical composi- 
tion and properties of cells, tissues and 
organisms. 

333 — Environmental Chemical 
Analysis (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 252, 205 or 21 1, 
212. Modern laboratory and field methods 
used in the evaluation of environmental 
systems. Laboratory. 

343 — Inorganic Chemistry 

(3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 112. Modern theories 
of atomic structure and chemical bonding 
and their applications to molecular and 
metallic structures and coordination 
chemistry. 

383, 384 — Physical Chemistry 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Prerequisties: Chemistry 112 and Physics 
201, 202, Math 221. Thermodynamic, 
kinetic, quantum mechanical and spec- 
troscopic properties of chemical systems. 

385 — Physical Chemistry 
Laboratory (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 252. Corequisite: 
Chemistry 383. Selected experiments 
involving measurements and evaluation of 
physicochemical propertier; of chemical 
systems. 



39 



392 — Instrumental Methods off 
Analysis (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 252, 385. Principles 
and methods of optimization of instrumental 
methods used in characterizing chemical 
systems. Laboratory. 

41 1 — Advanced Organic 
Chemistry (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. Organic reaction 
mechanisms and the relation of molecular 
structure to physical and chemical 
properties. 

423 — Experimental Methods in 
Chemistry (5) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, 252. Spectro- 
scopic chromatographic and chemical 
functional group techniques used in charac- 
terizing chemical systems. Laboratory. 

451, 452 — Seminar (1, 1) (N/M) 

Student reports on selected topics in 
chemistry for oral presentation and 
discussion. 

471 — Advanced Topics in 
Chemistry (2-3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Advanced treatment of selected topics in 
chemistry. 

491 — Individual Study 

(1-4) (N/M) 

Individual investigation under the direction 
of a member of the Department. Open to 
qualified students by permission of the 
Department. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, 
developed in consultation with the 
Department. Credits variable. 

Classics 

Department of Classics, Philosophy and 
Religion: Miss Hatch, Career Adviser 

Classics involves the study of the language 
and literature of ancient Greece and Rome, 
as well as the civilization which evolved 
during the period of Greek and Roman 
domination of the Mediterranean World. 
Since many ot the ideas and principles 
which emerged at that time are basic to 
the heritage of western civilization, courses 



in Classics are usually applicable to the 
study of almost all the liberal arts. 

Students wishing to major in Classics 
are offered the choice of a concentration 
in Latin or the interdisciplinary concen- 
tration major in Classical Civilization. 
In either area, students develop the 
program — which may include individual 
study — in consultation with a faculty 
adviser. 

While many department majors include 
teacher certification on their schedule, 
other students combine their concentration 
in Latin or Classical Civilization with 
studies in related fields, such as philosophy, 
English, or modern foreign languages. 
With such a background, graduates have 
a wide range of opportunities after 
college, including museum work, archae- 
ology, graduate study, teaching, or 
translating. 

See also listings under Greek and Latin. 

Requirements for the Major 

Classical Civilization: 40 Credits in approved 
courses related to classical civilization in 
Art, Philosophy, Religion, History, English, 
Archaeology, including 12 credits in Latin 
or Greek. 

201 — Classical Motifs in 
Literature (3) (L) 

Study of the hero's journey and related 
themes in Homer, Vergil, Tennyson, and 
Tolkien. 

202 — A Touch of Madness: The 
Greek Tragic Experience (3) (L) 

A study of the tragic plays of Aeschylus, 
Sophocles and Euripides. 

301 — Mythology (3) (H) 

The principal Greek and Roman myths, with 
emphasis on their influence in literature 
and art 

332 — Greek and Roman 
Civilization (3) (H) 

Ma)or facets of Greek and Roman culture 
and their influence on later western 
civilization. 



385 — Greek Archaeology (3) (H) 

Study of archaeological excavations in 
Greece with emphasis on the problems 
peculiar to the area 

386 — Roman Archaeology (3) (H) 

Study of the excavation of Roman sites both 
in Italy and other areas of the Mediterranean 

401, 402 — Special Studies in 
Classical Archaeology (2, 2) (H) 

Prerequisites: Classics 385, 386 and some 
knowledge of Latin and/or Greek First 
semester: modern archaeological techniques, 
preservation of finds, introduction to epi- 
graphy. Second semester: numismatics, 
small artifacts, and minor arts. 

491 — Individual Study in 
Classical Civilization (1-4) (H) 

Individual study under the direction of a 
member of the staff By permission of the 
Department. 

Computer and 
Information Science 

Department of Mathematical Sciences and 
Physics; Mr. Ackerman, Career Adviser 

The Department of Mathematical Sciences 
and Physics offers a major in Computer 
and Information Science as well as several 
courses and workshops for the non-major. 
The offerings are supported by an HP 
3000, Data General 1220, and numerous 
remote terminals and peripheral devices. 
FORTRAN, BASIC, COBOL and other 
higher level programming languages 
are utilized. 

A student majoring in computer science 
has the opportunity to undertake graduate 
work or pursue a career in many fields 
including government, industry or 
teaching. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 18 credits in Computer 
and Information Science courses including 
211 or 221 , 301 , 31 1 . 321 , 331 , and 401 . 

In Other Subjects: 18 credits in approved 
related courses including Mathematics 221. 
325, and Statistics 321. 



40 



101 — Introduction to Computers 

(2) 

Introduction to computers: structure and 
application of computer systems, program- 
ming in BASIC language and "hands on" 
experience. 

21 1 — Programming in COBOL (3) 

Computer organization, programming, algo- 
rithm development and applications in 
COBOL. 

221 — Programming in FORTRAN 

(3) 

Corequisite: Math 121. Computer organiza- 
tion, programming, algorithm development 
and applications in FORTRAN. 

301 — Introduction to Computer 
Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 211 or CPSC 221. 
Computer structure and machine language, 
assembly language, addressing techniques, 
macros, file I/O, segmentation and linkage, 
assemblers and interpretive routines. 

31 1 — Computer Organization (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 211 or 221. Basic logic 
design, coding, number representation and 
arithmetic, and introduction to computer 
architecture. 

321 — File Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 21 1 or 221 . File Process- 
ing environments, sequential access, data 
structures and random access using a 
variety of storage devices. 

331 — Operating Systems and 
Computer Architecture I (3) 

Prerequisites: CPSC 301 and 311. Includes 
such topics as dynamic procedure activation, 
system structure, evaluation, memory 
management, process management and 
recovery procedures. 

401 — Organization of 
Programming Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 301. An applied course 
in programming language construction 
emphasizing the run-time behavior of 
programs. 



41 1 — Data Structures and 
Algorithm Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 321 . Application of 
analysis and design techniques to non- 
numeric algorithms which act on data 
structures and selection of methods for 
data manipulation. 

431 — Operating Systems and 
Computer Architecture II (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 331. Continued devel- 
opment of material in CPSC 331. 

441 — Theory of Programming 
Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 401 . A formal treatment 
of programming language translation and 
compiler design concepts. 

451 — Automata, Computability 
and Formal Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: CPSC 441. A sampling of 
theoretical computer science, to include 
finite state concepts, formal grammars, 
computability and Turing machines. 

491 — Individual Study in 
Computer Science (3) 

Prerequisite: departmental permission. 
Individual study under the direction of a 
member of the staff. May lead to graduation 
with Departmental Honors. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Dance 

Department of Dramatic Arts and Dance: 
Miss Graham. Career Adviser. 

See Dramatic Arts for a statement of the 
departmental goals and program. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 36 credits in Dance 
courses, including two years of Ballet and 
two years of Modern Dance. 31 1. 331, 332, 
431 . 432. and six credits from 350. 351 , 
and 352. 



121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 
421, 422 — Ballet (1 each 
semester) 

Ballet as a discipline, emphasizing exactness 
and precision of line, creative expression, 
and historical reference. 

123, 124; 223, 224; 323, 324; 
423, 424 — Modern Dance (1 each 
semester) 

Body movement, its relationship to space, 
time, and force, through improvisation and 

exploration. 

235 — Movement for the Theater 

(3) (H) 

Creative projects in theatrical movement: 
mime, gesture, space, rhythm, and expres- 
sion. Alternate years: offered Spring 1982. 

241 — Dance Production (3) (H) 

Theories and techniques of dance 
production involving management, budget, 
sound and music, production design, 
rehearsal and performance. Course work 
supplemental with practical production work. 

31 1 — Theories of Movement 

(3) (H) 

Comparison of selected theories of move- 
ment such as Laban. Dalcroze. Delsarte, 
Graham, Humphrey-Weidman. and Wigman. 
Alternate years: offered Spring 1981. 

331 — Compositional Forms 

(3) (H) 

Structure of dance movement, phrases, 
rhythm, and traditional dance forms. 

332 - Dance Styles (3) (H) 

Dance related to historical periods in art, 
drama, and music, utilizing reading, research, 
films, improvisation, and composition. 

350 — Dance History Survey 

(3) (H) 

Dance from the earliest times — Primitive. 
Greek. Roman. Egyptian, European, Oriental, 
and Spanish, to the 15th century. 

351 - History of Ballet (3) (H) 

In-depth study of ballet in France. Italy. 
Russia, and England from the 15th century 
to the 20th century. Alternate years: offered 
Fall 1981 



41 



352 — American Dance Heritage 

(3) (H) 

Readings and research in American dance, 
including the Indian, Negro, Modern Dance, 
Contemporary Dance. Alternate years; 
offered Spring 1982 

353 — Ethnic Dance (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Dance 122, 124. The study 
of the history and culture of Western and 
Eastern countries through dance. Perform- 
ance of selected dances. Alternate years; 
offered Fall 1980. 

400 — Mary Washington Dance 
Company (1 each semester) 

Performance in the Dance Company. 
Admission by audition. (May also be taken 
without credit after auditioning). By per- 
mission of the Department. 

425 — Classical Ballet Variations 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Dance 321, 322, 421, 422 or 
permission of instructor. Theory and practice 
of solo variations in traditional classical 
ballets. Alternate years; offered Spring 1981. 

431, 432 — Choreography (3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 231, 232 or permission 
of instructor. In-depth study of selected 
techniques from compositional forms and 
dance styles. Opportunity for the student 
to develop creative potential. 

450 — Seminar in Dance (3) (H) 

Readings and research in contemporary 
dance in education, dance therapy, aesthe- 
tics, and philosophy. 

491, 492, 493, 494 — Individual 
Study (1-3 each) (H) 

Research, choreography, or composition 
of an approved creative project. By per- 
mission of the Department. 

499 — Internship (H) 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Drama 

Department of Dramatic Arts and Dance; 
Mr. Kenvin, Career Adviser 

The Department offers majors in both 
dramatic arts and dance. Both majors 
provide programs on which students can 
build further professional or graduate 
work. Techniques, theories, history, and 
literature are included in both majors. 
A third major, called Performing Arts is 
also offered for those wishing to divide 
their work between dance and drama. 

Important in the program is the variety 
of courses available to students. Also 
important are the many opportunities 
students have to perform either in theater 
or dance and to work on productions, 
thus learning different phases of the 
theatrical art. The student-run Tri-Muse 
Society encourages students interested 
in both dramatic arts and dance, and 
there is a chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, 
a dramatics honorary society. 

In addition to student-directed productions 
in Studio 13, the Department presents four 
major productions each year, three dir- 
ected by faculty and one by a student. 
Among recent productions in the 300- 
seat Klein Memorial Theater have been 
Gypsy, Godspell, The Tempest, Peer Gynt, 
and Kennedy's Children. The department's 
summer program in conjunction with The 
Fredericksburg Summer Theater, has 
presented such productions as Plaza Suite, 
and The Sound of Music. 

The Mary Washington College Dance 
Company, a vital part of campus cultural 
life, presents performances of modern 
dance and ballet in the 1700-seat George 
Washington Auditorium. 

Lectures and performances by visiting 
scholars and artists enrich the program. 
In recent years, the campus has hosted 
such artists as Agnes de Mille, Paul 
Taylor, Nikos Psacharopoulos, Ellen 
Stewart, Richard Schechner, and Maria 
Swoboda. 



Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 38 credits in Dramatic 
Arts courses, including 21 1 . 21 2. 221 . 222 
231 , 232, 361 , 362. 431 . and 432 Majors 
must also work on all productions of the 
department in some capacity 

211, 212 — World Drama (3, 3) (H) 

Selected plays and theatrical developments 
Introduction to the theater. 

221, 222 — Acting (3, 3) 

Voice and body training, pantomime, 
improvisation, creating character, ensemble 
playing. 

231, 232 — Stagecraft (4, 4) 

Theories and techniques of designing, 
building and painting stage settings; organi- 
zation and operation of production crews. 
Laboratory. 

250S, 251 S — Fredericksburg 
Summer Theater (3, 3) (H) 

Apprenticeship, including acting and tech- 
nical work, in the Fredericksburg Summer 
Theater. 

331, 332 — Playwriting (3, 3) 

Writing for the stage. Exercises and practice 
in the structure of action, character develop- 
ment, dialogue, critical analysis Alternate 
years; offered 1981-82 

341 — Stage Costuming (3) 

History and basic principles of costume 
design, use of historic period, silhouettes, 
stylization, color, and construction to create 
and enhance the theatrical illusion. Alternate 
years; offered Spring 1981. 

361 , 362 — History of the Theater 
(3,3) (H) 

Theaters, production methods, dramatic 
conventions, key figures from the Greeks 
to the present. Alternate years; offered 
1980-81 

371 — Oriental Theater (3) 

Indian. Japanese, Chinese theaters and 
their styles. Offered Spring 1981 

381 — History of Film to 1 945 

(3) (H) 

Viewing and analysis of film before 1945 



42 



382 - History of Film from 1945 
to the Present (3) (H) 

Viewing and analysis of film from 1945 to 
the Present. 

391, 392, 393, 394 — Theater 
Practicum (1 -2 each) (H) 

Credit for performance or production work 
on MWC major productions. Prerequisites: 
for technical work. Dramatic Arts 231 . 232; 
for acting. Dramatic Arts 221 . 222. Pre- 
requisites may be taken concurrently or 
equivalent experience may be substituted. 
By permission of the Department. 

421, 422 — Acting Styles and 
Scene Study (3, 3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Dramatic Arts 221. 222. 
Problems in acting. Creating and sustaining 
a character. Period styles. Alternate years: 
offered 1981-82 

431 , 432 - Directing (3, 3) (H) 

Technique and practice of directing for the 
stage. Student-directed productions pre- 
sented in Studio 13. Offered 1980-81. 

433 -Stage Lighting (3) (H) 

Prerequisites: Dramatic Arts 231 . 232. 
Theories and techniques of lighting stage 
productions; lighting instruments and equip- 
ment. Alternate years; offered Fall 1 981 . 

434 — Scene Design (3) (H) 

Prerequistes: Dramatic Arts 231, 232. His- 
tory, theory and design of stage scenery: use 
of architecture, art. ornament with the 
elements of design. Alternate years: offered 
Spring 1982. 

441 — Dramatic Theory and 
Criticism (3) (H) 

Analysis of dramatic criticism from Aristotle 
to the present. 



443 - Children's Theater (3) 



(H) 



Staging and production of plays for children. 
Alternate years: offered Fall 1 980. 

444 — Creative Dramatics (3) (H) 

Improvisational and experimental projects 
in acting for children's theater. 

451, 452 — Special Studies in 
Dramatic Arts (3, 3) (H) 

Concentration on a single area of dramatic 
arts. Topics vary from year to year. 



461 — Seminar in Dramatic Arts 

(3) (H) 

Readings, presentations, and projects in 
contemporary theater. 

491, 492, 493, 494 - Individual 
Study (1-3 each) (H) 

Individual study under direction of a member 
of the Department. By permission of the 
Department. 

499 — Internship (H) 

Supervised work experience, developed in 
consultation with the Department. Credits 
variable. 

Economics 

Department of Economics. Business and 
Public Affairs; Mr. Rycroft, Career Adviser 

Economics has been defined as what 
economists do. A more precise definition 
may not be possible. The discipline is 
as broad as it is exciting. Inflation, 
unemployment, the energy crisis, poverty, 
discrimination, growth and development, 
and the proper role of government in 
society are only a sample of the issues 
with which economists deal. 

The major program seeks to familiarize 
the student with the tools economists 
use to analyze these problems. This 
should help the individual in his or her 
decision-making role as a citizen of the 
nation, as well as provide a solid back- 
ground for advanced study or the taking 
of positions in business and government. 
Mary Washington's proximity to the 
nation's capital is a particularly valuable 
feature of the learning experience. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in Economics 
courses beyond 201 , 202, including 371 
and 372 

In Other Subjects: 1 5 credits in approved 
related courses including Statistics 200. 

101 — Elements of Economics 

(3) (S) 

One semester survey of the basic elements 
of economic theory. Students receiving 
credit for Principles may not receive credit 
for Elements. 



200 — Consumer Economics (3) 

A survey of business and economics prob- 
lems confronting consumers. Major areas 
covered will be: banking, real estate, 
insurance, budgeting, securities and estate 
planning. Majors may not receive credit for 
this course 

201 — Principles of Economics: 
Macroeconomics (3) (S) 

Basic principles of national income deter- 
mination. 

202 — Principles of Economics: 
Microeconomics (3) (S) 

Basic principles of production, exchange, 
distribution and consumption of goods and 
services. 

Economics 201 and 202 are pre- 
requisite for all 300- and 400-level 
Economics courses. 

301 — The Economics of National 
Issues (3) (S) 

In-depth analysis of contemporary economic 
problems in American society. 

310 — Corporate Finance (3) (S) 

Financial policies of corporations. 

31 1 — Economics of American 
Industry (3) 

Application of microeconomic analysis to 
the problems of business organization 

31 2 — Government and Business (3) 

A survey of all aspects of government 
interactions with the business community 
covering such topics as anti-trust, regulatory 
agencies, tariffs, etc. 

315 — Investment Analysis (3) (S) 

Introduction to portfolio theory and the use 
of both technical (mathematical) and funda- 
mental (economic) analysis in evaluating 
investment alternatives. 

321 — Money and Banking (3) (S) 

The nature and functions of money, banking 
organization and practices, and the role of 
the monetary sector in the determination of 
income and employment. 

341 — Government Finance (3) (S) 

An analysis of the appropriate rcle of 
government in the allocation of resources. 



43 



351 — Labor Market Analysis (3) (S) 

Analysis of the operation of labor markets. 
Topics include: human capital theory, 
economics of education, discrimination, 
poverty, labor market policy and the eco- 
nomic effects of unions. 

352 — Comparative Labor 
Movements (3) bl(S) 

History and development of the organized 
labor movement in selected countries. 
Discussion of selected current issues re- 
garding the relationship of the labor move- 
ment to the economy and worker. 

361 — Quantitative Economics I 

(3) (S) 

Introduction to some of the mathematical 
and statistical concepts necessary in 
advanced economics and econometrics. 

362 — Quantitative Economics II 

(3) (S) 

Special topics in quantitative economics. 

371 — Microeconomics (3) (S) 

A systematic study of the role of the price 
system in organizing economic activity and 
an evaluation of its effectiveness. 

372 — Macroeconomics (3) (S) 

Analysis of the determination of national 
income, employment and the price level. 
Discussion of consumption, investment, 
inflation and fiscal and monetary policy 

381 — Urban Economics (3) (S) 

An economic analysis of contemporary 
urban problems including structure and 
growth, housing, transportation, fiscal issues, 
urban labor markets, and central city and 
ghetto development. 

391 — Comparative Economic 
Systems (3) (S) 

A comparative analysis of economic sys- 
tems. Emphasis will be given to theoretical 
models of economy structure and perform- 
ance, as well as in-depth analysis of 
selected countries. 

392 — Economic Development 

(3) (S) 

An introduction to the economic character- 
istics and problems of less-developed 
countries and to theories and policies 
applicable to the developing country. 



401 — International Economics 

(3) (S) 

An introduction to international trade; the 
balance of payments, and related issues of 
foreign economic policy. 

410 — Environmental Economics (3) 

The application of economic methods to the 
analysis of environmental issues. Topics 
will include natural resource economics 
and public policy. 

421 — Economics of Health (3) 

A survey of market behavior, institutions, 
and public policy in the provision of health 
services. 

441 — History of Economic Thought 

(3) (S) 

A survey of economic analysis from Grecian 
antiquity to the 20th century, concentrating 
on the 18th and 19th centuries. 

442 — American Economic 
Development (3) (S) 

The study of factors contributing to the 
economic development of the United States, 
including the historical growth of economic 
institutions such as agriculture, banking, 
labor unions, and manufacturing. 

471 — Economics Seminar (3) (S) 

Special topics of interest to staff and 
students will be discussed in seminar 

491 — Individual Study in 
Economics (3) (S) 

Directed individual research on an approved 
problem in economics. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Education 

Department of Education; Mr Slayton, 
Career Adviser 

The role of the Department ot Education 
is to help students develop the compe- 
tencies necessary for successful teaching 
in elementary or secondary schools. 
Consequently, the Department functions 
as a service department offering, as 



electives, courses designed to prepare 
liberal arts students to meet requirements 
for certification as a teacher. 

The teaching education programs at the 
College are approved by the Virginia State 
Department of Education and the National 
Association of State Directors of Teacher 
Education and Certification. The Mary 
Washington College student completing an 
approved program is eligible for certi- 
fication in any of the more than 30 
states signatory to the Teacher Certifi- 
cation Reciprocation Agreement. 

Course sequences offered by the Depart- 
ment enable students to prepare to teach 
in nursery, kindergarten, and primary 
school (grades N, K, 1, 2, 3); in inter- 
mediate school (grades 4-7); in art (grades 
K-12), music (grades K-12); and in each 
of the following secondary school endorse- 
ment areas (grades 7-12): biology, chem- 
istry, dramatics, earth science, economics, 
English, French, general science, geography, 
German, history, journalism, social sciences, 
mathematics, Latin, physics, political 
science, sociology, and Spanish. 

In addition to full preparation for teach- 
ing, a Mary Washington College student 
may complete a foundation program 
which, with additional study at the 
graduate level, can provide entry into 
such professional specializations as special 
education, educational psychology, school 
administration, instructional supervision, 
and guidance and counseling. 

ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATION 
PROGRAMS: NURSERY SCHOOL, 
KINDERGARTEN TO GRADE THREE 
AND GRADES FOUR THROUGH 
SEVEN 

202 — Teaching the Very Young 
Child (3) 

A practical orientation to the behavior and 
needs of preschool children in educational 
settings Includes children, infancy through 
age four Field experience required. 

205 — Children's Literature (K-3) 
(4-7) (3) 

A survey of children's literature with em- 
phasis on fostering creativity and facilitating 
the language arts 



-- 



312 — Teaching in the Elementary 
School (4-7) (3) 

Objectives, practices and materials of the 
intermediate school. Emphasizes teaching 
subject disciplines, classroom management 
and evaluating pupil progress. Field experi- 
ence required. 

332 — Growth and Development 
of the Young Child (K-3) (3) 

Physical, social, emotional and intellectual 
development, birth through age eight. The 
effect of social forces on the behavior of 
the child. Held experience required. 

349 — Physical Education for the 
Elementary Teacher (K-3) (4-7) (3) 

Movement skills for children; includes 
movement exploration, creative rhythms, folk 
dance, games, and self -teaching for 
physical fitness 

359 — Music for the Elementary 
Teacher (K-3) (4-7) (3) 

Objectives and processes of teaching music 
in the elementary grades. 

369 — Art for the Elementary 
Teacher (K-3) (4-7) (3) 

Objectives and processes of teaching art 
in the elementary school. 

379 — Developmental Reading 
(K-3) (4-7) (3) 

An overview of the reading process, in- 
cluding theoretical bases and instructional 
practices. Field experience required. 

380 — Diagnostic Reading (K-3) 
(4-7) (4) 

A survey of reading problems and informal 
and formal diagnostic reading instruments 
and procedures. A formal practicum is 
required. 

402 — Teaching in the Kinder- 
garten-Primary Grades (K-3) (3) 

Principles, practices and materials of kinder- 
garten-primary school programs. Emphasizes 
teaching from a developmental point-of- 
view of the child. Field experience required. 

414 — Teaching Mathematics and 
Science in the Elementary School 

(K-3) (4-7) (3) 

Objectives, practices and materials of 
elementary mathematics and science pro- 
grams: emphasis on conceptual learning. 



SECONDARY ENDORSEMENT 
PROGRAMS: TEACHING THE 
DISCIPLINES, GRADES EIGHT 
THROUGH TWELVE (ART, MUSIC: 
KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 
TWELVE) 

310 — Reading in the Content 
Areas (3) 

Practices, principles and materials for 
teaching reading concomitantly with the 
subject discipline. Field experience required. 

317 — Teaching Music in the 
Elementary School (3) 

The objectives and processes of teaching 
music: emphasis on music reading, con- 
ceptual learning, curriculum and evaluation. 
(For music majors). Field experience required. 

318 — Teaching Music in the 
Secondary School (3) 

Music management in the secondary school, 
history and philosophy of music education, 
curriculum and current trends. (For music 
majors). Field experience required 

319 — Teaching Foreign Language 

(3) 

~-e cc ec: .es ;-=:: :es a - ; ~a:e- a ; 
of teaching modern and classical lan- 
guages in the secondary school. Field 
experience requires. 

320 -Teaching Art (3) 

The objectives, practices and materials of 
teaching art in elementary and secondary 
schools. (For art majors). Field experience 
required. 

321 — Teaching Mathematics (3) 

The objectives, practices and materials of 
teaching mathematics in the secondary 
school. Field experience required 

322 — Teaching Social Sciences 

(3) 

The objectives, practices and materials of 
teaching a social science discipline in the 
secondary school. Field experience required. 

323 — Teaching Sciences (3) 

The objectives, practices and materials of 
teaching a science discipline in the second- 
ary school. Field experience required. 



324 — Teaching English/Drama 
(3) 

The objectives, practices and materials of 
teaching English and/or Drama in the 
Secondary School. Field experience required. 

420 — Foundations of Teaching in 
the Secondary School (3) 

The affective curriculum viewed from the 
social- psychological perspectives: 
practical techniques for improving the 
teaching /learning environment are explored. 

ALL CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS 

440 — Supervised Teaching (9) 

Prerequisite: Approval of adviser and 
Department of Education. Orientation to 
teaching under direction of cooperating 
teachers in public elementary and secondary 
schools. 

441, 442, 443 — Supervision 
Seminar for Cooperating Teachers 
(2 each) 

Prerequisite: Selection to serve as a cooper- 
ating teacher. A sequential series of 
seminars in educational supervision avail- 
able only to classroom teachers serving 
as cooperating teachers to Mary Washington 
College student teachers. 

471 — Special Topics in Education 
(1-6) 

Specific subject content to be determined 
with participating school divisions. 



English 



Department of English. Linguistics, and 
Speech: Mr. Mitchell. Career Adviser 

The Department's programs permit 
majoring in English with a concentration 
in either literature or writing. Require- 
ments insure familiarity with both the 
language itself and with literary history, 
while choices within each major program 
allow a good deal of individual focusing. 
Introductory courses, numbered below 
300. provide experience in exact reading 
and shapely writing. The main body of 
courses, numbered from 300 to 399. offers 
chances to do more sophisticated writing, 
and to explore bodies of literature defined 
by period, genre, or theme. Seminars. 



45 



individual study, and internships, num- 
bered from 400 to 499, offer intense, 
highly individualized study to comple- 
ment the lectures and discussions through 
which our other courses operate. All 
classes are small, and a number of other 
activities, such as the Poetry Reading 
Series, bring professors and students 
together informally. While the Depart- 
ment has no ideology, we are devoted to 
witty and elegant expression, rigorous 
thought, mastery of detail, and intel- 
lectual honesty. 

Many students combine studying literature 
or writing with majors in other disci- 
plines. About 30% of our majors also 
certify for elementary or secondary 
teaching. Others go on to graduate or 
professional school. Still others take jobs 
in everything from the genuinely exotic, 
through the infinite shadings of journalism 
and public relations, to government and 
business. The specific skill nourished by 
majoring in English which employers 
value most is exact writing; but like all 
humane disciplines, English teaches com- 
plexity of thought and subtlety of 
feeling. What binds all English majors 
is joy in the language and love for its 
literature. 

Requirements for the Major 

Literature Concentration 

In Major Subject: 233; 27 credits in upper 
level English courses including 3 courses 
concentrating on literature written before 
1800, and 2 seminars. 

In Other Subjects: Linguistics 1 01 and 305. 

Writing Concentration 

In Major Subject: One course from English 
200, 201, 231, 232, 233; 27 additional credits 
in upper-level writing and literature courses 
to fit the following patterns: 

(1) at least 6 credits of 300-level writing 
courses; 

(2) at least 12 credits of upper-level litera- 
ture courses; 

(3) at least 6 credits of 400-level courses; 

(4) at least 6 credits in courses concen- 
trating on literature written before 1800. 

In Other Subjects: Linguistics 101 and 305. 



101 — Writing Workshop (3) 

Group and tutorial instruction in the funda- 
mental techniques of expository and argu- 
mentative writing: organization, development, 
coherence, research methods, mechanics. 

200 — Newsgathering (3) 

An introduction to the techniques of news- 
gathering, including practice in interviewing, 
beat reporting, and covering various kinds 
of news events. 

201 — Advanced Composition (3) 

Development of flexible and effective 
expository prose through analysis of models 
and practice with styles and techniques. 

21 1 — Survey of English 
Literature (3) (L) 

Literary movements and types from Beowulf 
through the 18th century, 

212 — Survey of English 
Literature (3) (L) 

Literary movements and types from the 
Romantic movement to the present. 

221 — Survey of American 
Literature (3) (L) 

American backgrounds and literary move- 
ments and types from the colonial writers 
through Whitman. 

222 — Survey of American 
Literature (3) (L) 

American backgrounds and literary move- 
ments and types from Dickinson to the 
present. 

231 — Short Fiction (3) (L) 

Study of selected short stories and short 
novels. 

232 - The Novel (3) (L) 

Study of the form, content, and development 
of selected novels. 

233 — Poetry (3) (L) 

Close analysis of poetic form and content. 

234 — Shakespeare (3) (L) 

Shakespeare's achievement in selected 
plays and poems 

235 - Tragedy (3) (L) 

Tragedy as form and idea reflected in 
selected literary and dramatic works of 
world literature. 



236 - Comedy (3) (L) 

Comic conventions in selected works of 
world literature. 

241 — Fantasy in Literature (3) (Li 

Themes, techniques, and structures in 
selections from the literature of fantasy. 

242 — Myth in Literature (3) 

Study of myth — cultural, natural, Christian, 
and classical — in selected literary works 

243 — Women in Literature (3) (L) 

Study of literature by women and about 
women. 

244 — Narrative Form in Fiction 
and Film (3) (L) 

Study of parallel narratives in novels and 
fiction films, to see how the medium of telling 
affects the story told. 

251 — Issues in Literature (3) (L) 

Significant literary figures, movements, and 
topics. Consult schedule of courses for 
specific topic. 

300 — Principles of Newspaper 
Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: English 200 or consent of the 
instructor. Practice in writing, reporting, 
editing, and laying out various kinds of news 
stories. 

301 — Principles of Magazine 
Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: English 200 or consent of the 
instructor. Practice in writing and laying out 
various kinds of magazine articles, with 
emphasis on feature writing. 

302, 303 — Creative Writing I and II 
(3,3) 

Prerequisite for 302: English 231 or 232 or 
233 or consent of the instructor. A workshop 
devoted to writing fiction and poetry. Primary 
emphasis on developing student abilities to 
write creatively, with periodic attention to 
examples from established writers. Only in 
sequence. 

304 — Studies in Prose Style (3) 

Prerequisite: English 201 or consent of the 
instructor Introduction to the varieties ot 
English prose. Analysis and imitation of 
historical models, from Bacon to Updike. 
Examination and practice of critical prose 



46 



techniques, from the modes of academic 
criticism to those of popular reviewing 
Linguistic analysis of style. 

309 — Chaucer and His Age (3) (L) 

Primarily Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, with 
some attention given to other lyric, heroic, 
or romance narratives of medieval England. 

315 — English Drama Through the 
Restoration (3) (L) 

Origins and development of English drama 
through the Restoration. Includes miracle 
and morality plays, and Elizabethan, 
Jacobean and Restoration drama. 

31 6 — Renaissance and Baroque 
Literature (3) (L) 

English nondramatic literature of the 16th 
and 17th centuries. Emphasizes Sidney, 
Spenser. Donne. Jonson. and Milton. 

319 — Shakespeare: The Early 
Plays (3) (L) 

Shakespeare's early development, focusing 
mainly on the comedies and history plays. 

320 — Shakespeare: The Later 
Plays (3) (L) 

Shakespeare's later development, focusing 
on the tragedies, problem plays, and final 
romances. 

325 — The Age of Neoclassicism 

(3) (L) 

English literature during the Restoration and 
the early 18th century, with emphasis on the 
revival of classical aesthetics and forms. 

326 — The Age of Sense and 
Sensibility (3) (L) 

English literature during the second half of 
the 18th century, with emphasis on the 
transition from Neoclassicism to Roman- 
ticism. 

333 - The British Novel to 1 945 

(3) (L) 

Growth of the English novel from its origins 
to the Second World War 

334 — The American Novel to 1 945 

(3) (L) 

Growth of the American novel from its 
origins to the Second World War. 



335 — English Romanticism: 
Wordsworth to Keats (3) (L) 

English literature of the early 1 9th century, 
concentrating on five great Romantic poets: 
Wordsworth. Coleridge. Byron. Shelley, and 

Keats. 

336 — Victorian Literature (3) (L) 

English literature from 1830 to 1900, 
emphasizing the poetry of Tennyson and 
Browning and the novels of Dickens. 

355 — American Romanticism 

(3) (L) 

Literary romanticism in 19th century 
American prose and poetry. Includes 
Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Whitman, 
and Dickinson. 

356 — American Realism (3) (L) 

Literary realism in American prose and 
poetry of the 19th and early 20th centuries. 
Include James. Dreiser. Twain, and others. 



365 — Modern Literature, 
1890-1930 (3) 



(L) 



Origins and development of major concerns 
and themes in the early modern period. 
Includes chiefly British and American writers. 



366 — Modern Literature, 
1920-1945 (3) 



(L) 



Explorations of modern themes and tech- 
niques in the works of major modern writers, 
chiefly British and American. 

367 — Modern Drama (3) (L) 

Modern drama beginning in the late 19th 
century. Includes Ibsen, Shaw, O'Neill. 
Beckett, and Pinter. 

369 — Contemporary European 
Fiction (3) (L) 

Major European writers of the 20th century 
and their reflection of literary, political. 
social, philosophical, and psychological 
developments. 

370 — Contemporary Literature 

(3) (L) 

Contemporary literature, primarily British 
and American, in all genres. 

375, 376 — Special Studies 

(3, 3) (L) 

Studies in significant literary figures, move- 
ments, and topics. Consult schedule of 
courses for specific topic. 



41 1 — Studies in Drama (3) (L) 

Major problems, themes, movements, or 
figures in drama. Consult schedule of 
courses for specific topic. 

413 — Studies in Poetry (3) (L) 

Major problems, themes, movements, or 
figures in poetry. Consult schedule of 
courses for specific topic. 

4 1 5 - Studies in the Novel (3) (L) 

Major problems, themes, movements, or 
figures in the novel. Consult schedule of 
courses for specific topic. 

445 — Studies in English Literature 
to 1600 (3) (L) 

Significant figures, movements, themes, or 
problems in English literature to 1600. 
Consult schedule of courses for specific 
topic. 

447 — Studies in English Literature, 
1600-1800(3) (L) 

Significant figures, movements, themes, or 
problems in English literature. 1600-1800. 
Consult schedule of courses for specific 
topic. 

449 — Studies in English Literature, 

1 800- Present (3) (L) 

Significant figures, movements, themes, or 
problems in English literature. 1800 to the 
present. Consult schedule of courses for 
specific topic. 

455 — Studies in American 
Literature to 1 900 (3) (L) 

Significant figures, movements, themes, or 
problems in American literature through 
the 19th century. Consult schedule of 
courses for specific topic. 

457 — Studies in American 
Literature, 1 900-Present (3) (L) 

Significant figures, movements, themes, or 
problems in American literature of the 20th 
century. Consult schedule of courses for 
specific topic. 

465 — Senior Seminar (3) (L) 

Literature as a discipline. Topics include 
literary history, textual criticism, contem- 
porary prose styles, and use of linguistics 
and computer techniques. 



47 



491, 492, 493, 494 - Individual 
Study (3 each) (L) 

Individual study under the direction of a 
member of the staff. 

495 — Individual Study in Creative 
Writing (3) (L) 

Prerequisites: English 302, 303. Individual 
study under the direction of a member 
of the staff. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Environmental Earth 
Sciences 

Department of Biological Sciences; 
Mr. Bass, Career Adviser 

The Environmental Earth Sciences major 
is designed to promote the study of the 
linkage between mankind and the environ- 
ment. The scope of this major necessitates 
specialization in one of two areas; 
students may elect to emphasize the 
natural science or the social science 
aspects. The natural science concentration 
will provide a background in biology, 
chemistry and geology. The analytical 
skills available in this program of study, 
coupled with an appreciation for socio- 
economic considerations, will prepare the 
student to evaluate environmental problems 
and work on solutions taking into con- 
sideration the limits of societal resources. 
The social sciences concentration focuses 
on the economic, political and sociological 
aspects of modern man. Study of the 
impact of mankind on the environment 
and the repercussions therefrom, coupled 
with an appreciation of the biotic and 
physical parameters of the environment, 
will prepare the student to evaluate 
government, industry and environmentalist 
positions on environmental issues. 

Environmental legislation and the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency regulations have 
produced an increased demand by both 
industry and all levels of government 
for personnel who are trained in the 



environmental sciences. These programs 
of study will provide a strong background 
for advanced study or allow placement 
directly in a variety of career areas, 
depending on the individual course of 
study. 

Requirements for the Major 

N.B. Students expecting to major in 
Environmental Earth Sciences should take 
the following courses as basic requirements 
or electives because they are prerequisite 
to courses in the major program: Biology 
121,1 22, Chemistry 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 or 1 05, 1 06; 
Economics 201, 202. 

Core Courses: Environmental Earth Sciences 
101, 460; Biology 311 or 322; Chemistry 
205, 252 or 21 1 ; Economics 410; Geography 
313; Geology 101 or 102; Sociology 311 
or Geography 275. 

Required Groupings: 14-16 Credits from 

courses in one of the following groupings 
to form an approved, cohesive program 
(No more than three courses may be taken 
in any one discipline): 

A. Natural Environmental Studies: 

Biology 311,31 2, 322, 342, 352S, 361 , 363, 
371; Chemistry 205, 211, 212, 252, 317, 
318, 319, 320, 333; Geography 312, 414, 
41 5; Geology 1 01 , 1 02, 301 , 402, 411; 
Environmental Earth Sciences 481, 491, 499. 

B. Social Environmental Sciences: 

Anthropology 102; Economics 301, 308, 
Geography 275, 345, 414, 415; Political 
Science 311, 312, 332; Public Administra- 
tion 402; Sociology 311, 313; Environmental 
Earth Sciences 481, 491, 492. 

Recommended: Computer Science 101; 
Geography 213; Mathematics 121; Physics 
101, 102, or 201, 202; Statistics 200; 
Courses in A or B above. 

101 — Introduction to Environ- 
mental Earth Sciences (1 ) 

Mankind and the environment as viewed 
from the social and natural sciences. 

460 — Environmental Earth 
Science Seminar (2) (N/M) 

Multidisciplinary evaluation of environmental 
problems. Senior level seminar for EES 
maiors; others by permission of the 
instructor 



481 — Readings in the Environ- 
mental Earth Sciences (2) 

Readings in EES literature selected by the 
student, who is guided by a staff member. 
Open to junior and senior majors by 
permission of the Department. 

491 — Special Problems in the 
Environmental Earth Sciences (3) 
or (4 for honors) 

Prerequisite: 481. Individual investigation 
supervised by a staff member. Open to 
junior and senior majors with permission 
of the Department. 

499 — Internship 

Prerequisite: junior or senior major in good 
academic standing with appropriate back- 
ground. Supervised off-campus experience, 
developed in consultation with the Depart- 
ment. Credits variable. 

French 

Department of Modern Foreign Languages; 
Mrs. Blessing, Career Adviser 

See Modern Foreign Languages for state- 
ment of departmental goals and program. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in French 
courses beyond 201-202, including 18 in 
literature and 391, 392. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
courses in literature, in another language, 
or in the history, geography, or arts of the 
country of the language studied. 

101-102 — Beginning French (6) 

Grammar, composition, conversation, 
reading, laboratory use 

201-202 — Intermediate French (6) 

Grammar review, reading, oral work, 
laboratory use. 

291, 292 — Studies in Language I 
(3,3) 

Grammar, composition, conversation. 

300 — French Phonetics (3) 

Recommended for French majors and 
prospective teachers of French Fall 1982 



48 



321, 322 — Introduction to French 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

A thematic approach to French literature 
through selected works of the 17th-20th 
centuries. 

323 — French Studies: Special 
Topics (3) (L) 

Consult schedule of courses for specific 
topic. Fall. 1982. 

341 — Literature of the Middle Ages 
and Renaissance (3) (U 

French literature from its beginning through 
the 16th century, including Tristan et 
Iseult. Ronsard, Rabelais, Montaigne. Spring 
1981. 

351 — Drama of the Seventeenth 
Century (3) (L) 

Comeille, Moliere and Racine. Fall, 1983. 

352 — Non-dramatic Literature of 
the Seventeenth Century (3) (L) 

Pascal, Mme. de Sevigne, Mme. de La 
Fayette, LaFontaine, Fenelon. Spring 1982. 

361 — Literature of the 
Eighteenth Century (3) (L) 

Fiction, drama, and philosophy. Spring 1983. 

371 - Novel of the Nineteenth 
Century (3) (L) 

Hugo, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert and Zola. 
Spring 1982. 

372 — Nineteenth Century Poetry 
and Theater (3) (L) 

Lamartine, Hugo, de Musset. and Dumas. 
Fall 1982. 

381 — The Novel of the Twentieth 
Century (3) (L) 

Proust, Gide, Mauriac and Malraux. Spring 
1981. 

382 — Twentieth Century Theater 

(3) (L) 

Claudel, Sartre, Anouilh and lonesco. 
Spring 1983. 

391 , 392 — Studies in Language 
11(3,3) 

Advanced grammar, composition, conversa- 
tion. Required of majors. 

481 — Senior Seminar (3) (L) 

Selected topics. Required of senior majors 



491, 492 - Individual Study 
(3,3) 

Intensive study of one or more authors 
selected by student in consultation with 
adviser. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



(D 



Geography 



Department of Anthropology, Geography and 
Sociology; Mr. Gouger, Career Adviser 

Geography supports a liberal education 
program by describing, analyzing, and 
explaining the diverse forces which 'work 
to produce the varied world in which 
man lives. 

Of special interest is a career-focus 
grouping of courses in cartography which 
meets or exceeds the requirements of the 
state and federal civil service and provides 
training acceptable to most private 
mapping firms. Other departmental 
programs are designed to provide the 
basis for graduate studies. Teacher certi- 
fication in geography is offered in 
cooperation with the Department of 
Education. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 36 credits in Geography 
courses, which shall normally include at least 
one course from the regional, systematic, 
and professional areas of the course 
offerings. Up to 6 credits in Geology may 
be substituted for Geography courses. 

212 — World Cultural Geography 

(3) (S) 

Concepts, themes, and methods of cultural 
geography. Analysis of cultural patterns on 
regional, continental, and global scales. 

213 — Physical Geography (3) 

An introduction to the varied processes 
which act on and produce the spatial 
patterns of physical features on and near 
the surface of the earth. 



220 — Geography of Anglo-America 

(3) (S) 

Regional geography of the United States and 
Canada, stressing differences in land, 
landscape, life, and livelihood. 

241 — Introductory Economic 
Geography (3) (S) 

Distribution, description, and analysis of 
traditional economic systems, their spatial 
and environmental frameworks, and their 
roles in the modern world. 

275 — Human Environment: 
Perception and Utilization (3) (S) 

Human ecology, environmental quality, 
pollution, resource utilization, conservation, 
and man's role in changing the face of the 
earth. 

312 — Geomorphology (3) 

Origin and development of landforms and 
their relation to underlying structure, process 
and time. 

31 3 — Weather and Climate (3) 

Analysis of weather processes; distribution 
of climatic regions; impact of climate upon 
man and nature. 

325 — Geography of Europe (3) (S) 

Climate, surface features, natural resources, 
population, agriculture, industry, and trade 
of the European continent. 

326 — Geography of the 

Soviet Union (3) (S) 

Landforms, climate, boundaries, trade, 
resources, people, and cultural groupings 
of the Soviet Union. 

331 — Geography of 

East Asia (3) (S) 

Environment, landscape, and livelihood of 
Central Asia, the Far East, and Southeast 
Asia. 

332 — Geography of the Middle East 
and India (3) (S) 

Environment, landscape, and livelihood of 
the Middle East and the Indian sub- 
continent. 

333 — Geography of Africa (3) (S) 

Landforms, climate, peoples, boundaries, 
trade, resources, and cultural groupings of 
the African continent. 



49 



334 — Geography of 

South America (3) (S) 

Survey of population, natural resources, 
geographic regions and potentialities of 
South America. 

335 — Geography of Middle America 
and the Caribbean (3) (S) 

Survey of population, natural resources, 
geographic regions, and potentialities of 
Middle America and the Caribbean, 

341 — Advanced Economic 
Geography (3) (S) 

Theoretical approaches to location of 
economic activity, spatial models of eco- 
nomic systems; regional economic organ- 
ization. 

345 — Introductory Urban 
Geography (3) (S) 

Origin and diffusion of pre-industrial cities; 
their environmental settings, urban ecology, 
functions, and morphology in both Old and 
New Worlds. 

346 — Introduction to Planning 

(3) (S) 

Study of the basic concepts, laws, and 
methods used in city and regional planning. 

361 — Geographical Influences 

on History (3) (S) 

Influences of man's physical environment 
on history, with emphasis on American 
history. 

362 — Political Geography (3) (S) 

Study of geographic factors in world power 
and international affairs. 

414 — Air Photo Interpretation (3) 

Basic principles of photogrammetry, geo- 
graphic interpretation of aerial photographs 
and introduction to remote sensing of the 
environment. 

415 — Cartography (4) 

Introduction to basic cartographic methods; 
analyses of cartographic problems with 
exercises in techniques of graphic 
presentation. 



416 — Advanced Cartography (4) 

Prerequisite: Geography 415 or permission 
of instructor. Advanced cartographic 
techniques, including cartograms, negative 
scribing, block diagrams and physiographic 
mapping. 

417 — Field Methods (3) 

Methods of obtaining information, mapping 
and preparation of reports and illustrative 
materials based on field research experi- 
ence. Offered summer only. 

418 — Field Geography (3) 

Intensive study of a problem in physical, 
economic or cultural geography, conducted 
in an area of geographic interest. Offered 
summer only. 

422 — Historical Geography of 
North America (3) (S) 

Geography of selected regions of North 
America during designated periods of history. 

445 — Advanced Urban Geography 

(3) (S) 

Post-industrial cities: an intensive view of 
their urban structure, internal and external 
spatial relationships, and city-systems. 

470 — History of Geographic 
Thought (3) (S) 

Seminar on development of geographic 
knowledge, theory, philosophy, and methods 
as illustrated by the writings of representa- 
tive geographers. 

475 — Readings in Geography 

(3) (S) 

Directed readings on a selected topic in 
geography under the guidance of a faculty 
member. 

491 — Special Problems in 
Geography (3-6) (S) 

Individual study of some geographic problem, 
selected in consultation with the Department. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Geology 



Department of Chemistry and Geology; 
Mr Dagenhart, Career Adviser 

Introductory and second-year geology 
courses are designed to introduce students 
to the basic principles and broad appli- 
cations of the science. The upper level 
courses provide a more in-depth analysis 
of geological processes for students who 
are considering professional employment 
in areas such as mineral exploration and 
geologic mapping. With an appropriate 
selection of courses in mathematics and 
the basic sciences, graduate study may 
be pursued. The major program also 
provides the background for careers in 
the teaching of earth sciences. 

In consultation with the career adviser 
the geology major may also select courses 
in related science fields to develop a 
career-focused grouping e.g., geology/ 
geography for positions in urban and 
land-use planning or cartography, geology/ 
environmental earth sciences for environ- 
mental or water resources careers, 
and geology/chemistry/physics for geo- 
chemical or geophysical research or 
evaluation of energy and mineral resources. 

The Department of Chemistry and 
Geology has well equipped laboratories 
to support and reinforce classroom 
instruction. Facilities are available for 
x-ray diffractometry, x-ray fluorescence, 
atomic absorption, emission spectroscopy, 
and thin section preparation. Field 
equipment includes a proton magne- 
tometer, seismometer, surveying equip- 
ment, and altimeters. The department 
possesses an extensive collection of 
rocks, minerals and fossils as well as 
several petrographic and optical micro- 
scopes. Computer facilities are also 
available. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in Geology 
courses, including 101, 102, 301, 302, and 
three other upper-level courses. Geography 
312 and 313 may be substituted for two of 
these courses. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
related courses. 



50 



101 — Introductory Geology 

(4) (N/M) 

Recommended preparation: Mathematics 
11 1 or equivalent. Introduction to the earth 
and its rocks, minerals, fossils, mountains, 
earthquakes, erosion, and glaciers. 
Laboratory. 

1 02 — Oceanography (3) (N/M) 

Recommended preparation: Mathematics 

1 1 1 or equivalent. The oceans, ocean floor, 
sediments, continental drift, tides, currents, 
waves, seawater, and marine resources. 

201 — Paleontology (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Geology 101 and Biology 121. 
Plant and animal fossils and the ancient 
environment indicated by their presence. 
Laboratory. 

301 — Mineralogy (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Geology 101 and Chemistry 

112 or 106. Study of minerals including an 
introduction to crystallography and methods 
of identification. Laboratory. 

302 - Petrology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Geology 301. Origin, occur- 
rence and structure of rocks with an 
emphasis on identification and classifica- 
tion. Laboratory. 

31 1 — Sedimentation and 
Stratigraphy (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Geology 101 (Geology 301 
is recommended as a prerequisite or co- 
requisite). Survey of sedimentary particles, 
transport processes, depositioned environ- 
ments, and resulting strata. Laboratory. 

402 — Geochemistry (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Geology 301. Study of distri- 
bution, migration, and abundance of the 
elements within the earth. 

41 1 — Soil Science (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Geology 301. 
Properties, processes, composition, classifi- 
cation and evolution of soils. Laboratory. 

41 2 — Structural Geology (4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Geology 302. 
Analysis and interpretation of structural 
features of the earth's crust such as folds 
and faults. Laboratory. 



421 — Advanced Topics in 
Geology (2-4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Specialized topics not offered on a regular 
basis e.g., Geophysics. Hydrology and 
Advanced Mineralogy. Laboratory included 
with certain topics. 

491 — Individual Study (1-4) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Investi- 
gation of a topic which may include labora- 
tory and literature research. Course of study 
determined by instructor and student. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

German 

Department of Modern Foreign Languages; 
Mr. Merrill, Career Adviser 

See Modern Foreign Languages for statement 
of departmental goals and program. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in German 
courses beyond 201-202, including 18 in 
literature and 391, 392. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
courses in literature, in another language, 
or in the history, geography or arts of 
the country of the language studied. 

101-102 — Beginning German (6) 

Grammar, composition, conversation, 
reading, laboratory use. 

201-202 — Intermediate German (6) 

Grammar review, reading, conversation. 

291, 292 — Studies in Language I 

(3,3) 

Grammar, composition, conversation. 

315,316 — German Culture and 
Institutions (3, 3) (S) 

History, art, music, customs, traditions of 
German-speaking peoples. 

321, 322 — Introduction to German 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

A study of representative authors, genres, 
and literary movements in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. 



371 — German Classicism (3) (L) 

The German Hochklassik as seen in Goethe 
and Schiller. 

372 — German Romanticism (3) (L) 

Includes Eichendorff, Kleist, Novalis and 
Tieck. 

373, 374 — Nineteenth Century 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

From Biedermeier through Junges Duetsch- 
land and Realism. 

381, 382 — Twentieth Century 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

Includes Hofmannsthal Mann, Rilke, Musil, 
Kafka, Brecht, Durrenmatt, Frisch, Boll, 
Grass, Wolf. 

391, 392 — Studies in Language II 

(3,3) 

Advanced grammar, composition, conversa- 
tion. 

481, 482 — Seminar in German 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

Selected topics which vary from year to year. 

491, 492 — Individual Study 

(3, 3) (L) 

Intensive study of one or more authors 
selected by the student in consultation 
with adviser. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Greek 

Department of Classics, Philosophy and 
Religion 

See Classics for general statement of 
goals and program. 

131-132 — Elementary Greek (6) 

Introduction to the language of ancient 
Greece. Grammar and composition are 
stressed, leading to translation of literature. 

1 33, 1 34 — Intermediate Greek 
(3,3) 

Prerequisite: Greek 131-132 or equivalent. 
Review of grammar. Read ; ngs from Plato 
plus selections from other authors. 



51 



Health 

Department of Health and Physical 
Education See Physical Education. 

Historic Preservation 

Department of History and American 
Studies; Mr. Spiess, Career Adviser 

The major in historic preservation is 
interdisciplinary in structure, designed to 
acquaint the student with a broad range 
of preservation activities, including the 
identification, recovery, interpretation, 
conservation and restoration of the 
materials of history. The main purposes of 
the program are, first, to provide an over- 
view of the preservation field; and, second, 
to establish a solid background in the 
academic disciplines upon which preser- 
vation activities are based. 

The historic preservation program is 
significantly enhanced by the location of 
the College in Fredericksburg, amidst 
an area exceptionally rich in history from 
the Colonial, Revolutionary and Civil War 
periods. The student is thus able to 
utilize many readily-available assets in 
conducting field work, engaging in 
individual study, or developing internship 
opportunities. Upon completion of the 
major, the student will have been intro- 
duced to a variety of preservation 
activities — including museum, archival, 
architectural, and archaeological work — 
and will be prepared for entry-level 
employment or for further study at the 
graduate level in those areas. 

Requirements for the Major 

N.B. Art History 114, 1 1 5 and History 101, 
102 are prerequisite for Historic Preserva- 
tion 201, 202. 

In Major Subject: 18 credits in Historic 
Preservation courses, including 201, 202, 
301, 303, 305, 307. 

In Other Subjects: 18 credits in approved 
related courses. 



201, 202 — Principles of Historic 
Preservation (3, 3) 

Prerequisites: History 101 and 102, Art 
History 114, 115. Survey of the preservation 
field, with attention to historic, social, 
economic, political, legal and environmental 
issues. May be taken only in sequence. 

301 — Museum Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: Art History 114, 1 1 5, or per- 
mission of instructor. Study of the purposes 
and functions of museums and investigation 
of basic techniques of museum work. 

303 — Archival Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
Examination of various elements of archival 
work, including validation, preservation, 
and cataloging of collections. 

305 — Architectural Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: Art History 114, 115, or 
permission of instructor. Analysis of tech- 
niques of preservation, restoration and 
planning. 

307 — Archaeological Techniques 

(3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Study 
of methods of archaeological survey, 
excavation, analysis, recording and inter- 
pretation. 

471 — Special Studies in Historic 
Preservation (3) 

Prerequisite: Historic Preservation 201, 202. 
Seminars on selected topics of importance 
within the preservation field. 

491 — Individual Study (3) 

Prerequisite: Historic Preservation 201, 202 
and permission of instructor. Individual 
investigation of a significant subiect in 
historic preservation, directed by faculty 
member. 

499 — Internship 

Prerequisites: Historic Preservation 201, 202 
and appropriate additional course work in 
the major. Field experience with a preser- 
vation-related agency outside the College, 
supervised by a faculty member. Credits 
variable. 



History 



Department of History and American Studies. 
Mr Warner, Career Adviser 

The history curriculum, which is widely 
diversified, has several distinctive features, 
including a series of introductory courses 
which divides Western Civilization and 
American history into component periods, 
thereby allowing students to select areas 
of particular interest. There is a special 
200-level course which focuses each 
semester on a different topic of current 
interest. The 400-level Special Studies 
courses, which offer a variety of topics 
of historical significance, provide the 
opportunity for the exchange of ideas 
within a seminar format. An internship 
option enhances the program by granting 
credit for certain history-related, career- 
oriented work outside the classroom. 

The history major prepares the student for 
a variety of careers. Because the discipline 
requires the ability to analyze and com- 
municate ideas as well as to retain factual 
information, it is an ideal preparation 
for law school or for a career in govern- 
ment, politics, or teaching. When 
combined with appropriate courses in 
other disciplines, it also provides an 
excellent background for a career in 
library or archival work; for journalism 
or media research; or for a business 
career in such areas as personnel or 
public relations. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 30 credits in History 
courses beyond the 200-level of which at 
least nine must be at the 400-level including 
471 and 495. At least nine credits must 
be taken outside the primary area of 
concentration. 

101 — Early America: 17th and 
18th Centuries (3) (S) 

Discovery, exploration, settlement and 
expansion of the colonies; the era of the 
Revolution; the Confederation; establishment 
of the Constitution. 



52 



1 02 — Middle America: 

19th Century (3) (S) 

Development of the party system; rise of 
Jacksonian democracy; slavery and sec- 
tionalism; the Civil War and Reconstruction; 
the emergence of industrial America. 

1 03 — Modern America: 

20th Century (3) (S) 

Development of the United States as a 
world power from 1 900 to the present, with 
emphasis on social, economic, political 
and diplomatic developments. 

1 1 1 — Western Civilization I: 
Ancient Period (3) (S) 

From the origins in Mesopotamia through 
Classical Greece, the Hellenistic World and 
the Roman Republic to the decline of the 
Roman Empire. 

1 12 — Western Civilization II: 
Medieval Period (3) (S) 

From the fall of the Roman Empire to the 
Renaissance, with emphasis on the church, 
feudal institutions, medieval thought and 
the origins of modern national institutions. 

113 — Western Civilization III: 
Early Modern Period (3) (S) 

From the Renaissance and Reformation 
through the Age of Absolutism and the 
Enlightenment to the French Revolution 
and Napoleon. 

1 14 — Western Civilization IV: 
Modern Period (3) (S) 

From 1815 to the present, with emphasis 
on cultural, intellectual and political develop- 
ments, the World Wars, fascism and 
communism. 

200 — Topics in History (3) (S) 

Various historical subjects are chosen 
according to timely interest. Specific topics 
are announced in semester class schedules. 

301, 302 — Diplomatic History of 
the United States (3, 3) (S) 

First semester, analysis of American foreign 
relations from colonial period to 1860; 
second semester, 1860 to present. 

303 — The American South (3) (S) 

Slavery and the plantation system, rise of 
sectionalism. Civil War and Reconstruction, 
the era of segregation and the civil rights 
movement. 



304 - The Civil War (3) (S) 

Development of Southern nationalism and 
the Confederacy; emphasis on social, 
economic and political, as well as military, 
aspects of the War. 

305 — The Frontier in American 
History (3) (S) 

Western movement across the continent 
from colonial beginnings to the present; 
impact of frontier experience on American 
attitudes and values. 

306 — The Black in American 
History (3) (S) 

Development of racism, the slavery experi- 
ence, the segregation era, the civil rights 
movement and the rise of black militancy. 
Offered Fall 1981. 

307, 308 — Social History of the 
United States (3, 3) (S) 

Changing patterns of thought and social life 
in America, emphasizing the impact of 
Darwinism and industrialism. 

309 — The American Indian (3) (S) 

From pre-history to the present, with 
emphasis on differences among Indians and 
on interaction between Indians and whites. 

311, 312 — History of Virginia 

(3,3) (S) 

First semester, English origins and colonial 
developments through the Revolutionary 
era; second semester, Jeffersonian period 
to the present. 

331 — Ancient Greece (3) (S) 

Geography, history and civilization of Greece 
from the earliest times through the death 
of Alexander the Great. Offered Fall 1981. 

332 — Ancient Rome (3) (S) 

Formation, development and demise of the 
Republic; Augustus and the Empire; and 
the impact of Christianity. Offered Spring 
1982 



333 — The Renaissance and 
Reformation (3) 

Growth of Italian city-states, the new 
philosophy of man, Christian humanism 
and the spread of Protestantism. 



(S) 



351, 352 — History of England 

(3,3) (S) 

Survey of English history from beginning 
to present with emphasis on economic and 
political aspects and growth of British 
empire. 

353, 354 — History of France 

(3,3) (S) 

First semester, Gaul and the Franks to 
French Revolution and Napoleon; second 
semester, Restoration Era to deGaulle. 

356 — History of Germany (3) (S) 

From the wars of unification to the present, 
with emphasis on the era of Bismarck, 
World War I, Weimar Republic, Third Reich 
and Cold War. Offered Fall 1 981 . 

357, 358 — History of Russia 

(3, 3) (S) 

First semester, Kiev, Moscovy and Imperial 
Russia to 1856; second semester, the last 
Romanovs, Revolution and Soviet Period. 

359, 360 - History of Spain (3, 3) (S) 

From Moorish invasions to the present, with 
emphasis on social and economic develop- 
ments from the 16th century to the modern 
age. Offered 1981-82. 

361 , 362 — History of Latin America 

(3,3) (S) 

Colonial institutions, the independence 
movement, development of modern states, 
the Organization of American States and 
other international problems. Offered 
1980-81. 

364 — History of Japan (3) (S) 

Social, political and intellectual develop- 
ment of Japan from the earliest times to the 
present; emphasis on the rise of Japan to 
world power. 

365, 366 — History of China (3, 3) (S) 

Social, political and intellectual development 
of China from the earliest times to the 
present; emphasis on the rise of modern 
nationalism, Maoist period. 

371, 372 — European Diplomatic 
History (3, 3) (S) 

First semester, development of modern state 
system through Napoleon; second semester, 
from Congress of Vienna through the World 
Wars to detente. 



53 



375 — Military History (3) (S) 

The art of war and its impact on society 
from 18th century to present; military 
developments analyzed in terms of organ- 
ization, strategy and technology. 

380 — United States since 1 945 

(3) (S) 

Emphasis on major issues of the postwar 
era, including the Cold War, McCarthyism, 
civil rights movement, Vietnam, black 
militancy and feminism. 

381 — Europe since 1945 (3) (S) 

From end of World War II to present, with 
emphasis on Cold War, Common Market, 
colonial independence movements and 
domestic developments. Offered Spring 
1981. 

382 - Far East since 1945 (3) (S) 

Cultural, social, economic and political 
developments in modern China, Japan and 
Korea, with emphasis on relations of those 
countries with United States and Soviet 
Union. 

401, 402 — United States Cultural 
and Intellectual History (3, 3) (S) 

Development of American culture and ideas 
through major historical figures and events; 
emphasis on law, science, religion and 
reform. Offered 1981-82. 

411,412 — European Cultural and 
Intellectual History (3, 3) (S) 

Analysis of significant developments in 
philosophical, political, religious, social and 
scientific thought, and their impact upon 
European culture. Not offered 1980. 

471 — Special Studies in History 

(3) (S) 

Seminars on selected topics of particular 
historical importance. Junior or senior 
status required. 

481 — Historiography (3) (S) 

The study of historical interpretation with 
emphasis on the major developments which 
have shaped the discipline of history. Junior 
or senior status required. 



491 — Individual Study (3) (S) 

Individual investigation of a subject of 
historical significance, directed by a member 
of the Department. By permission of the 
instructor. 

495 — Historical Research (3) (S) 

Introduction to methods of historical research 
and writing, involving in-depth investigation 
of a subject of the student's choice. Senior 
status required. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

International Affairs 

Department of Economics, Business and 
Public Affairs; Mr. Kramer, Career Adviser 

The interdisciplinary major in International 
Affairs is designed to provide the student 
with a broad knowledge of the contem- 
porary international system as well as 
with specific expertise in a given geo- 
graphic area and/or academic discipline. 
To this end, the major combines core 
courses that examine international affairs 
from a variety of disciplinary perspec- 
tives with related courses that permit 
students to pursue in depth their particular 
geographic and/or disciplinary interests. 

Career opportunities for the major in 
International Affairs range from such 
traditional areas as work with government 
or private agencies engaged in research 
on foreign policy or intelligence issues 
to such new and rapidly expanding areas 
as employment with multinational corpora- 
tions or international banking institutions. 

Requirements for the Major 

Core Courses: 36 credits in approved related 
courses including Economics 401 (pre- 
requisite 201, 202); Geography 362; History 
302; Political Science 321, 322, 356. 

In Other Subjects: at least six credits in 
each of two languages at the intermediate 
level or six credits in one language at the 
advanced level 

Recommended: Political Science 101. 102. 



Ital 



lan 



Department of Modern Foreign Languages; 
Mr. Ascari, Career Adviser 

See Modem Foreign Languages for statement 
of departmental goals and program. 

101-102 — Beginning Italian (6) 

Grammar, composition, conversation, 
reading, laboratory use 

201-202 — Intermediate Italian (6) 

Grammar review, reading, oral work, 
laboratory use. 

315, 316 — Society and Civilization 
(3,3) 

Literary, social and cultural history of the 
Italian people. Offered in 1980-81 

371, 372 — nineteenth Century 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

Includes Manzoni, Foscolo, Leopardi, 
D'Annunzio, De Sanctis, Verga, Pascoli. 
Carducci, Fogazzaro, Nievo. Offered in 
1981-82. 



381, 382 — Modern Italian 
Literature (3, 3) 



(D 



From Pirandello to Montale; prose and 
poetry of Gozzano, Suero, Ungaretti. Moravia. 
Carlo Levi, Cardarelli, Palazzeschi, Buzzah. 
Silone, and others. 

395 — Italian Literature in Trans- 
lation, Dante's Divine Comedy (3) (L) 

Taught in English. Includes other early 
Italian poets 

396 — Italian Literature in 
Translation: Masterpieces 

of the Renaissance (3) (L) 

Taught in English. Petrarch, Boccaccio. 
Cellini, Anosto, Castiglione. Tasso, Machia- 
velli, etc. 

491, 492 — Individual Study 

(3,3) (L) 

Intensive study of one or more authors 
selected by student in consultation with 
adviser 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped m consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



54 



Latin 

Department of Classics, Philosophy and 
Religion; Miss Hatch, Career Adviser 

See Classics for general statement of 
goals and program. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 1 9 credits in Latin courses 
beyond the intermediate level including 351. 

In Other Subjects: 1 2 credits in approved 
related courses. 

Recommended: Greek 



111-112 — Elementary Latin (6) 

Essentials of Latin grammar and composi- 
tion; introduction to the translation of Latin 
literature. 

1 1 3, 1 1 4 - Intermediate Latin (3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 111-112 or two units of 
secondary school instruction. Continued 
study of Latin grammar and composition; 
readings from Latin prose, first semester; 
introduction to Latin poetry, second 
semester. 

211, 212 — Survey of Latin 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

Prerequisite: Latin 113, 114 or four units of 
secondary school Latin. Historical survey 
of the development of Latin literature from 
earliest inscriptions to the end of pagan 
Roman writing. 

310 — Medieval Latin (3) (L) 

311 — Roman Drama (3) (L) 

312 - Roman Historical Writing 

(3) (L) 



313 — Roman Satire (3) 

314 - Epic Poetry (3) 



(L) 
(D 



351 — Advanced Latin Grammar 

(D (L) 

Required for all majors. 

41 1 — The Life and Times of Julius 
Caesar (3) (L) 

In-depth study of Roman life and letters from 
100-40 B.C. with readings from many 
contemporary sources. 



451, 452 — Special Studies in Latin 
Literature (3, 3) (L) 

Reading and study of individual Latin 
authors, genres of literature or of an area 
of Roman civilization. By permission of the 
Department. 

491, 492 - Individual Study 

(3,3) (L) 

Individual study under the direction of a 
member of the staff. By permission of the 
Department. 

Library Science 

The ability to make effective use of library 
resources is essential to a liberal arts 
education. The offering in Library Science 
is designed to enhance student awareness 
of libraries in general and the College 
library in particular. 

101 — Library Resources and Their 
Use(1) 

Introduction to college library resources 
with limited emphasis on techniques of 
research. Taught by members of the Refer- 
ence staff. 



Linguistics 



Department of English, Linguistics, and 
Speech 

In offering courses in linguistics the 
Department aims to give the student, 
regardless of special interest, an under- 
standing of the fundamental structure of 
language and, in conjunction with other 
disciplines, an opportunity to explore the 
acquisition of language in cultures and 
societies. 

101 — Introduction to General 
Linguistics (3) 

The nature, structure and function of 
language; its acquisition; its relationship 
to thought, and its use in a social context. 

201 —Issues in Sociolinguistics and 
Anthropological Linguistics (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 101. The signifi- 
cance of language for human social life; 
language as an instrument for the acquisition 
of personality, of social role and social 
status; verbal behavior and nonverbal 
communication. 



(S) 



301 — Major Figures in Linguistics 

(3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 101. A course in the 
history of linguistic thought with special 
emphasis on significant figures and key 
developments in twentieth century linguis- 
tics. 

305 — The English Language (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 101. Structural, 
transformational, and case grammars and 
their application to English. 

491, 492, 493, 494 — Independent 
Study in Linguistics (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 101. In-depth 
individual research in an area of linguistics 
under the guidance of a member of the staff. 
By permission of the Department. 



Mathematics 

Department of Mathematical Sciences and 
Physics; Mr. Conroy and Mr. Lindsey, 
Career Advisers 

The courses in Mathematics vary from the 
theoretical to the applied so that a major 
in mathematics can be a foundation for 
careers in industry, government, teaching 
or for the pursuit of a higher degree in 
graduate school. The Department also 
encourages double majors giving students 
entrance to a wide variety of fields upon 
graduation. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in Mathematics 
courses beyond 221, including 331, 332, 341, 
342 and 478 or 479. 

In Other Subjects: 1 2 credits in approved 
related courses. 

101 — Introduction to Mathematics 

(3) (N/M) 

A beginning level finite math course for 
liberal arts students. Course contents may 
vary. 

1 1 1 — Precalculus (3) (N/M) 

Emphasis is on elementary functions 
including rational, exponential, logarithmic 
and trigonometric functions. 



55 



121 — Calculus I (3) (N/M) 

Calculus of algebraic functions with 
applications. 

221 — Calculus II (3) (N/M) 

Advance topics of calculus of algebraic 
functions and calculus of transcendental 
functions with applications. 

231 — Calculus III (4) (N/M) 

Solid analytics, multivariate calculus, vector 
analysis and infinite series. 

300 — Linear Algebra (3) (N/M) 

Matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces 
and linear transformations. 

312 — Differential Equations 

(3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Calculus II; recommended: 
Calculus III. Ordinary differential equations 
including LaPlace transformations. 

321 — Number Theory (3) (N/M) 

Properties of the integers: divisibility, 
congruences, quadratic reciprocity and 
number-theoretic functions. 

325 — Discrete Structures (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Math 221. Mathematical models, 
sets, binary relations and functions, counting 
and algebras. 

331, 332 — Abstract Algebra 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Math 300 or permission of 
instructor. Mappings, groups, rings, fields, 
vector spaces and linear transformation. 
Only in sequence. 

341, 342 — Advanced Calculus 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Math 231. A rigorous, real 
analysis approach to the topics of calculus. 
Only in sequence. 

361 — Topics in Applied 
Mathematics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Math 231, 300, 312 or per- 
mission of instructor. Selected topics in 
applied mathematics, such as partial 
differential equations, Fourier series and 
optimization methods. Course content may 
vary as interest of class and instructor 
demands. 



41 2 — Complex Variables (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Math 341 Analytic functions, 
Cauchy-Riemann conditions, integration, 
power series, calculus of residues, con- 
formal mappings and applications. 

431, 432 — Higher Geometry 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Methods of higher geometry; geometries of 
projective group of transformation: applica- 
tions of affine and metric geometries. 

441 — General Topology (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Math 301. Point-set theory 
including connectedness, compactness, 
continuity and metric space. 

451, 452 — Numerical Analysis 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Corequisite: Math 341. Numerical methods 
applied to solutions of equations: interpola- 
tion; differentiation; integration; and solution 
of differential equations. Only in sequence. 

478, 479 — Senior Seminar (1,1) 

Student must research and present a senior 
level mathematics topic to the class and 
the mathematics faculty. 

491, 492, 493, 494 — Selected 

Topics in Mathematics 

(3 each) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: departmental permission 
Individual study under the direction of a 
member of the staff. May lead to graduation 
with Honors in Mathematics. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Medical Technology 

Department of Biological Sciences; 
Mrs. Southworth, Career Adviser 

See page 6 for description of this 
cooperative program 

Under the cooperative program in Medical 
Technology, the student completes three 
years (92 credit hours) of undergraduate 
course work at Mary Washington College, 
followed by 12 months of clinical training 
at Fairfax Hospital, Roanoke Memorial 
Hospitals, or the University of Virginia 



Hospital. The degree earned is a Bachelor 
of Science in Medical Technology and 
is awarded by Mary Washington College. 

Admission to the final 12-month hospital 
training program is competitive. The 
student must meet the admission require- 
ments of the hospital to which application 
is made and should apply during the third 
year at Mary Washington. Upon success- 
ful completion of clinical work, students 
are qualified to take the National Registry 
Examination given by the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

If students enrolled in the medical 
technology program change their interest, 
they may continue with the regular degree 
program at Mary Washington. 

Requirements for the Major 

At Mary Washington College: Biology 121, 
1 22. 382-383, 271 , 391 ; Chemistry 111. 
112, 211, 212 (or 205, 252 instead of 211, 
212); Mathematics 111, 121, and Physics 
201, 202 (or 101, 102) 

At Cooperating Hospital: Clinical year 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 

Department of Modern Foreign Languages 

Through classes in French, Spanish, 
German, Italian and Russian, the Depart- 
ment offers students an opportunity to gain 
mastery of one or more foreign languages. 

Students learn to read, understand, speak, 
and write the language of their choice. 
Language laboratory facilities for tapes 
and records are used extensively to 
supplement classroom instruction. Upper- 
level classes are conducted in the foreign 
language. Through classroom instruction, 
individual research, and work in depart- 
ment-sponsored language clubs, students 
come to know the culture of the people 
whose language they are using. 



56 



The Department has major programs in 
French, Spanish, and German, and provides 
Spanish and Franch majors an opportunity 
to reside in small campus residence halls in 
which the language is spoken exclusively 
and which sponsor various intercultural 
programs each year. 

The Department cooperates with a variety 
of overseas study groups, advises students 
wishing to study abroad, and helps in 
planning their foreign study programs. 

Graduates in modern foreign languages 
enter teaching or any number of fields in 
which knowledge of a second language 
is essential, including translation, research, 
human services or international business 
and industry. 

See individual language listings: French, 
German, Italian, Russian, Spanish 

LITERATURES IN TRANSLATION 

The Department of Modern Foreign 
Languages offers in its 395-6 category 
foreign literatures in English translation, all 
counting toward the literature requirement 
for the degree. All courses are three credits. 

ITAL 395 — Dante's Divine Comedy. 

ITAL 396 — Renaissance Masterpieces 
(Petrarch, Boccaccio, etc.) 

RUSS 395 — Russian writers of the 19th 
century. Fall 1980. 

RUSS 396 — 20th century writers (Gorky, 
Solzhenitsyn, etc.). Spring 1981. 

RUSS 397 — Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. 
Fall 1981. 

SPAN 395 — Don Quixote. Spring 1982. 

SPAN 396 — Spanish American master- 
pieces. Fall 1981. 

Music 

Department of Music; Mrs. Norwood, 
Career Adviser. 

The Department of Music offers a major 
program in music as well as courses that 
can be chosen as electives by students 
whose primary interests are in other fields. 



The major program includes intensive 
study in the theory, literature, history 
and skill areas of music as well as instruc- 
tion in instruments and voice. As in all 
liberal arts programs, the emphasis is on 
broad coverage rather than specialization. 

The courses and major program of the 
Department provide a background for 
graduate school, careers in the performing 
arts, teaching, and the music industry, 
as well as personal enrichment through 
a better understanding of the art and 
science of music. 

Regular recitals and concerts by faculty, 
visiting performers and campus organiza- 
tions are sponsored; the College also 
presents artists in the formal Concert 
Series. Students appear in general recitals, 
senior recitals, and perform with the 
College-Community Orchestra, MWC 
Chorus, and various other vocal and 
instrumental ensembles. 

The Music Department has a chapter of 
Mu Phi Epsilon, international professional 
music fraternity, and sponsors student 
chapters of the American Guild of 
Organists and the Music Educators 
National Conference. 

The Department of Music is an institution- 
al member of the National Association 
of Schools of Music, and its courses are 
fully accredited by that organization. 

Requirements for the Major 

N. B. Students planning to major in Music 
should take Music Theory 181, 285, and 
Music History and Literature 271 in their 
first semester. 

In Major Subject: Music Theory 181, 281, 
285, 286, 381, 382, 385, 386, 481, 491; 
Music History and Literature 271, 272, 371, 
372, 471, 472, plus 12 more credits in Music 
courses above the 100-level. 

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE 
(MUHL) 

251 — Music in Concert (1 ) (H) 

Application of evaluative techniques and 
formal concert reporting using available 
live performance experiences. 



255 — Introduction to Music (3) (H) 

The developments of aural perception of 
music through examples of symphonic, 
choral, operatic, chamber, vocal, and key- 
board works presented historically. 

267 — Music and the Arts (3) (H) 

Music-oriented humanities course empha- 
sizing stylistic character and cultural climate 
of music in relationship to other arts of 
Western civilization. 

269 — History of Musical Instru- 
ments (3) (H) 

Evolution of musical instruments in Western 
culture, performance practices, literature 
and development of the orchestra. 

271 — Medieval History and 
Literature (1) (H) 

Historical concepts from antiquity through 
1450. Cultural roles, liturgical developments 
and secular styles presented through 
representative compositions. 

272 — Renaissance History and 
Literature (1) (H) 

Historical concepts from 1450 through 1600. 
Cultural roles, liturgical developments and 
secular styles exemplified. Vocal and instru- 
mental works demonstrated. 

351 — Keyboard Literature (2) (H) 

Historical survey of keyboard music written 
from the 17th century through the present, 
including works written for harpsichord, 
organ, and piano. 

353 — Choral Literature (2) (H) 

Sacred and secular literature from the 
Renaissance through the 20th century. 
Consideration of textual and musical 
content. 

355 — Symphonic Literature (2) 

A theoretical and historical study of orches- 
tral music from its inception through the 
present. Examples from major works will 
be investigated. 

357 — History of Opera (3) 

Major developments in opera from 1600 
to the present, including works by Monte- 
verdi, Purcell, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, 
Debussy, and Berg. 



57 



361 — History of American Music 

(3) (H) 

Exploration of music brought to America 
by early settlers, its European roots, history 
and development from colonial times 
onwards. 

367 — Twentieth Century Music 

(3) (H) 

Twentieth-century practices in musical 
compositions and their relationship to the 
historical developments in music. 

368 — History of Jazz (3) (H) 

Development of jazz, ragtime, blues, dixie- 
land, boogie-woogie, and later styles which 
evolved from jazz. 

370 — Introduction to Electronic 
Music (3) (H) 

Emphasis on historical development, current 
status, physical concepts, language and 
compositional techniques as they apply to 
synthesized music. 

371 — Baroque History and 
Literature (1) (H) 

Historical concepts from 1600 through 1750. 
The developments of operatic, choral, 
instrumental and solo literature. Representa- 
tive works presented. 

372 — Classical and Romantic 
History and Literature (1 ) (H) 

The developments of instrumental, choral, 
keyboard and solo literature presented 
through definitive compositions. 

468 — Choral Music for Church (1 ) 

Comprehensive survey of selected choral 
offerings for the church. Participants sing 
and discuss choral techniques. 

469 — Choral Music for School (1 ) 

Comprehensive survey of selected choral 
offerings for the school. Participants sing 
and discuss choral techniques. 

471 — Music Through Beethoven 

(2) (H) 

Prerequisite: MUHL 271, 272, 371, 372 or 
equivalent. In depth study in music history 
culminating in analysis of specific, signifi- 
cant compositions. Research techniques are 
formulated. 



472 — Music From Beethoven 

(2) (H) 

Prerequisite: 471 or equivalent. In-depth 
experiences in music history culminating 
in analysis of specific, significant composi- 
tions. Research techniques are formulated. 

491, 492 — Individual Study 

(1-3) (H) 

Individual study under the direction of a 
Music Department faculty member. Details 
may be obtained from the chairperson. By 
permission of the Department. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department 
of Music. Credits variable. 

THEORY OF MUSIC (MUTH) 

181 — Introduction to Music Theory 

(3) (H) 

Basic music theory explained. Modes, 
scales, clefs, intervals, notation, etc., concep- 
tually presented with examples from early 
music. 

281 — Pre-Baroque Music Theory 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: MUTH 181 or equivalent. 
Species counterpoint, late 16th century 
polyphony, evolution of triads and emphasis 
on the motet and early chorale writing. 

285 — Skill Development 1(1) 

Development and application of aural and 
written skills. Includes sight-singing, dictation 
and keyboard experiences. Companion 
course to MUTH 1 81 , and must be taken 
by music majors with that course. 

286 — Skill Development II (1 ) 

Prerequisite: MUTH 285. See MUTH 285 
for course description. Companion course to 
MUTH 281: and must be taken by music 
majors with that course. 

369 — Orchestration (3) (H) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MUTH 382. 
Techniques of instrumental scoring consid- 
ered historically and creatively. 



381 — Baroque Music Theory (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: MUTH 281 Explores major- 
minor tonality, figured bass. 7th chords, 
cadence formulae, modulations and progres- 
sions as exemplified in period pieces. 

382 — Classical Music Theory (3) (Hj 

Prerequisite: MUTH 381. Harmonic syntax 
and structure of the posNBaroque era is 
covered. Includes altered chords, disinte- 
gration of tonality and advanced chromatism 
to the 20th century. 

385 — Skill Development III (1) 

Prerequisite: MUTH 286. See MUTH 285 
for course description. Companion course 
to MUTH 381; and must be taken by music 
majors with that course. 

386 - Skill Development IV (1) 

Prerequisite: MUTH 385. See MUTH 285 
for course description. Companion course 
to MUTH 382; and must be taken by music 
majors with that course. 

481 — Contemporary Music Theory 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: MUTH 382. Harmonic concepts 
of Hindemith, Schoenberg and other 20th- 
century composers are explored, including 
12-tone techniques. 

483 — Music Composition (3) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MUTH 481 
Compositional techniques focusing on 
selected style periods, featuring both 
large and small models. A creative project 
is required. 

491 — Music History-Theory 
Seminar (2) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MUTH 481. 
MUHL 472. Analysis from an historical and 
theoretical perspective. 

MUSIC PERFORMANCE (MUPR) 

Studio Lessons 

Individual lessons (based upon placement 
audition) are offered advanced performers 

A maximum of twelve hours in individual 
instruction is allowed toward the degree 
However, all credits beyond this will be 
credited over and above the 122 hours 
required for graduation. 



58 



300-level courses constitute one half-hour 
lesson per week for one credit. 400-level 
courses constitute one hour lesson per week 
for two credits. 

301, 401 — Voice 
305, 405 — Piano 

309, 409 — Harp 

310, 410 — Organ 

311, 411 — Flute 

312, 412 — Oboe 

313, 413 — Clarinet 

314, 414 — Bassoon 

315, 415 — Saxophone 

321, 421 — French Horn 

322, 422 — Trumpet 

323, 423 — Trombone/Baritone 

324, 424 — Tuba 

325, 425 — Percussion 
331,431 —Violin 

332, 432 — Viola 

333, 433 — Violoncello 

334, 434 — Contrabass 
336, 436 — Guitar 

201 , 202, 203, 204 — Class Voice I, 
I, IV (1) 

Class instruction for beginners through the 
intermediate level. Emphasis on the funda- 
mentals of vocal techniques through 
performance. An audition is required for 
placement in 202. 203, and 204. 

205, 206, 207, 208 — Class Piano I, 
II, III, IV (1) 

Class instruction for beginners through the 
intermediate level. 205 and 206 deal with 
fundamental performance techniques, 
including note reading, while 207 and 208 
emphasize musical expression. An audition 
is required for placement in 206, 207, and 
208. 

211,212- Class Woodwind 
Instruments (1) 

Beginning class study in performance 
techniques of woodwind instruments. 



221, 222 — Class Brasswind 
Instruments (1) 

Beginning class study in performance 
techniques of brasswind instruments. 

225 — Class Percussion (1 ) 

Beginning class study in performance 
techniques of rudimental snare drumming. 

231, 232 - Class String 
Instruments (1) 

Beginning class study in performance 
techniques of string instruments. 

236, 237 - Class Guitar (1 ) 

Beginning class study of performance 
techniques of the guitar. 

341 — Chorus (1) 

Students have an opportunity to study and 
perform selected repertoire for women's 
voices representing all periods of music 
literature. Open by audition. 

342 - Orchestra (1) 

Orchestral literature from all periods of 
music performed. This group serves as a 
nucleus for the College-Community Orches- 
tra. The College-Community Orchestra is 
comprised of students and community 
instrumentalists who enjoy performing 
orchestral repertoire. Open by audition. 

343 - Keyboard Ensemble (1) 

To give the keyboard performer experience 
in ensemble playing through literature for 
four hands, piano accompanying and sight 
reading. 

344 — Instrumental Ensemble (1) 

Performance experience for students whose 
interest is in small group participation. 
Open by audition. 

347 — Choral Conducting (2) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MUTH 382, 386. 
Principles and techniques of choral conduct- 
ing, including choral materials, choral 
arranging and program planning. 

348 — Instrumental Conducting (2) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MUTH 382, 386. 
Principles and techniques of instrumental 
conducting, including materials, score 
reading and program planning. 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

359 — Music for the Elementary 
Classroom Teacher (3) 

Objectives and processes of teaching 
music in the elementary schools with 
emphasis on music reading, conceptual 
learning and teacher competencies. For the 
non-music major who is preparing to teach 
in the elementary schools. 

Teacher preparation classes for the music 
major are listed under the Department of 
Education: 317, 318. 

470 — The Orchestra and the School 

(2) 

Deals with the problems of maintaining 
an orchestral ensemble within the school. 



Performing Arts 

Department of Dramatic Arts and Dance 

See Dramatic Arts for statement of 
departmental goals and program. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 36 credits in Performing 
Arts, including two years of Ballet, two years 
of Modern Dance, Dance 235, Drama 221, 
222, 421, 422, Dance 491 or Drama 491, 
and ten additional credits in approved 
upper-level Dance or Drama courses. 



Philosophy 



Department of Clasics, Philosophy and 
Religion; Mr. Van Sant, Career Adviser. 

Philosophy is the critical examination 
of our basic beliefs. It requires the analysis 
of abstractions, and it develops the ability 
to do research, organize results, and 
present these results in written or oral 
form. 

Because the Department emphasizes 
creative research into philosophical 
problems as well as the competent expres- 
sion of one's own views, philosophy can 
be studied profitably by a student majoring 
in any College program. 



59 



The objectives of the Department are 
to serve the academic program of the 
whole College by offering courses of 
interest to the scientist and mathemati- 
cian, to the social scientist, and to the 
student interested in the humanities and 
literature. 

The major in philosophy is of special 
interest to students who wish a deeper 
understanding of the history of the 
discipline and the interrelations between 
philosophical problems. The major is 
especially beneficial to students planning 
to enter the traditional professions of 
law, theology, or medicine. Many students 
give depth to their academic preparation 
by combining philosophy and another 
subject in a double major. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in Philosophy 
courses of which 18 must be in upper-level 
courses. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
related upper-level courses. 

111 — Introduction: Morals and 
Society (3) (H) 

Alternate views of the nature ot morality. 

1 51 — Introduction to Logic and 
Language (3) (H) 

Valid forms of reasoning. " 

211 - Ethical Studies (3) (H) 

The status and justification of moral judg- 
ments, and the reasons behind disagree- 
ments in moral issues 

244 — Philosophy of Science (3) (H) 

Survey of modern philosophical writing about 
science. 

304 — American Philosophy (3) (H) 

Survey of American thought. 

306 — Advanced Logic (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 151 or completion of 
six hours of mathematics. Theory of formal 
systems; applied criteria of consistency, 
completeness and quantification; and other 
topics in symbolic logic. 

312 — Aesthetics (3) (H) 

Examination of a variety of attempts to 
validate norms of taste and of criticism. 



320 — Philosophical Problems of 

Law (3) (H) 

The relation between moral philosophy 
and criminal and civil law 

321 - Greek Philosophy (3) (H) 

Selected works of Plato and Aristotle 

322 — Medieval Philosophy (3) (H) 

Survey of scholastic philosophy. 

343 — Existentialism (3) (H) 

Recent philosophical developments in the 
continental European tradition. 

344 — History of Scientific Thought 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: completion of the natural 
science and mathematics degree require- 
ment. Key developments in the history 
of scientific thinking. 

354 — Philosophy of Education 

(3) (H) 

Historical and contemporary philosophical 
examinations of the goals and methods of 
education. 

371 — Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
Century Philosophy (3) (H) 

Survey of major thinkers from Descartes 
to Hume. 

372 — Kant (3) (H) 

Selected major works of Immanuel Kant. 

373 — Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Century Philosophy (3) (H) 

Critical consideration of major thinkers and 
movements from the late 19th century to 
the present 

481 — Readings in Philosophy 

(3) (H) 

Discussion of philosophical literature in a 
field selected by the Department after 
consultation with students. 

491, 492, 493 - Individual Study 
(3-6) (H) 

Tutorial under the direction of a member 
of the staff. By permission of the Department. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Physical Education 

Department of Health and Physical 
Education 



Participation in physical activities, 
including physical education classes, 
recreational programs, and intercollegiate 
athletics, is considered an essential part 
of the educational experience at Mary 
Washington. 

The center for all indoor health, physical 
education and recreation is Goolrick Hall. 
A modern 74,000 square foot building, it 
houses courts for basketball, volleyball, 
and badminton, two dance studios, a large 
swimming pool, one four-wall handball- 
racketball court, seven one-wall racketball 
courts, a 16-station weight machine, a 
table-tennis room, indoor golf and archery 
ranges, seven large classrooms, and an 
auxiliary gym for classes in individual 
exercise and gymnastics. 

The outdoor facilities include fields for 
hockey, soccer, lacrosse, flag football, and 
Softball, an archery range, a golf driving 
range and putting areas, a running trail, 
a track, and fourteen tennis courts 
(including a new ten-court lighted 
complex.) 

Physical education courses include history, 
rules, and basic techniques in a wide range 
of individual and team sports. Riding 
courses are available for credit, but require 
a special fee. Health 100 provides an 
exposure to modern health problems. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

100 — Contemporary Health 
Problems (3) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(Courses may be repeated for addi- 
tional credit) 

101 , 301 - Field Hockey (1,1) 
103, 303 - Basketball (1,1) 
105, 305 - Volleyball (1,1) 
1 09, 309 — Lacrosse (1,1) 
111,311 — Gymnastics (1,1) 
113, 313 — Individual Exercise 
(1,1) 



60 



115, 316 — Swimming (1, 1) 

119, 319 — Flag Football (1,1) 

123, 323 — Soccer (1, 1) 

127, 327 — Folk and Social Dance 

(1,1) 

132, 332 — Racketball (1,1) 

133, 333 — Tennis (1, 1) 
135, 335 -Golf (1, 1) 
139, 339- Archery (1, 1) 
141,341 — Fencing (1, 1) 
145, 345 — Badminton (1,1) 

147 — Beginning Horsemanship 

(D 

Fundamentals of a good, balanced 
seat at the walk, trot, and canter; basic 
terminology of horsemanship and its 
equipment. 

150 - First Aid (1) 

247 — Intermediate Horsemanship 

(1) 

Balanced seat with quiet control at all gaits; 
jumping fundamentals; the development of 
the horse and equine psychology. 

31 5 — Advanced Life Saving (1 ) 

347 — Advanced Horsemanship 

(1) 

Polished style in hunter seat equitation; 
development of individual horses to their 
potential, on the flat and over fences; 
preparation for intercollegiate competition. 
Stable management, equine psychology, 
preventive medicine, and first aid. 

401 — Intercollegiate Field Hockey 

(D 

403 — Intercollegiate Basketball (1 ) 
405 — Intercollegiate Volleyball (1 ) 
409 — Intercollegiate Lacrosse (1) 

415 — Water Safety Instruction (1 ) 

41 6 — Intercollegiate Swimming (1 ) 
423 — Intercollegiate Soccer (1 ) 
433 — Intercollegiate Tennis (1 ) 
435 — Intercollegiate Golf (1 ) 

471 —Intercollegiate Cross Country 

(1) 

481 — Intercollegiate Track (1) 



Physics 



Department of Mathematical Sciences and 
Physics; Mr. Atalay, Career Adviser. 

The courses offered in the Physics major 
are primarily theoretical in nature; how- 
ever, well-equipped laboratories make it 
possible for upperclass students to engage 
in research. 

The diversity of the curriculum allows 
students to pursue careers in industry, 
government, and teaching or to undertake 
graduate work. The Department also 
encourages double majors which enhances 
the job opportunities of graduates. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in Physics 
courses above 204, including 321, 322, 
331, 332, 411, 412. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
related courses. 

101, 102 — General Physics 

(4,4) (N/M) 

Introductory course. Primarily for non- 
science and non-physical science students. 
Stresses conceptual rather than mathemati- 
cal aspects. Laboratory. 

201, 202 — General Physics 

(4,4) (N/M) 

Corequisite: Math 121. Introductory course. 
Primarily for science students. Covers 
essentially the same as Physics 101, 102, 
except more mathematical rigor is em- 
ployed. Laboratory. 

203, 204 — General Astronomy 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Historical and descriptive survey of the 
physical universe. A limited laboratory is 
included. 

31 1 — Atomic Physics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: General Physics. Foundations 
of quantum mechanics, atoms with one 
electron, multielectron atoms, molecules, 
solid state physics, the special theory of 
relativity. 

31 2 — Nuclear Physics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: General Physics. Nuclear 
structure, static and dynamic properties, 



and fundamental particles. A limited labora- 
tory includes experiments in alpha, beta 
and gamma-ray spectroscopy. 

321, 322 — Classical Mechanics 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Physics 102, or 202 or 
equivalent, and Mathematics 231. Kinematics 
and dynamics of mass particle, conservation 
laws. Lagrange, Hamiltonian methods, 
Hamilton's equations of motion, the special 
theory of relativity. Only in sequence. 

331, 332 — Electricity and 
Magnetism (3, 3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 221 and General 
Physics. Foundations of electromagnetic 
theory. Emphasis on lectures and limited 
laboratory demonstrations. Only in sequence. 

371 — Thermodynamics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 221 and 
General Physics. Temperature, thermody- 
namic states and variables, the laws of 
thermodynamics, entropy, thermodynamic 
potentials, change of phase. 

382 — Electronics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 221 and 
General Physics. Introduction to the theory 
and operation of electronic instruments 
and basic circuilts. Limited lectures with 
emphasis on laboratory work. 

391 —Optics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 221 and General 
Physics. Introduction to theory of physical 
optics, includes lectures and laboratory. 

411, 412 — Quantum Mechanics 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Physics 322. Schrodinger's 
equation, harmonic oscillator, matrix formu- 
lation of quantum mechanics, angular 
momentum, scattering theory, perturbation 
theory, relativistic quantum mechanics. The 
computer is often used for matrix manipu- 
lation. Only in sequence. 

451, 452 — Methods of Theoretical 
Physics (3, 3) (N/M) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 221 and General 
Physics. Vectors, matrices, coordinates, 
functions of complex variable, differential 
equations, Fourier and Laplace transforma- 
tion, vector spaces, variational methods, 
tensors, group theory. Only in sequence. 



61 



462 — Advanced Nuclear Physics 

(3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Physics 312. Corequisites: 
Physics 411, 412. Mass, size and constitution 
of nuclei, nuclear models, two-body forces, 
scattering reactions, introduction to ele- 
mentary particles. The computer is used for 
matrix computations. Usually taught as a 
summer course. 

472 — Statistical Mechanics 

(3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Physics 371. Ensembles, 
microcanonical, canonical and grandconon- 
ical distributions, Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose- 
Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions. 



482 — Physics Seminar (1 ) 

Open to third and fourth year physics 
students for credit 



(N/M) 



491, 492 — Individual Study 

(3,3) (N/M) 

Open to junior and senior physics majors. 
Qualified seniors may undertake individual 
study, which culminates with a thesis, which 
may lead to Honors in Physics. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Political Science 

Department of Economics, Business and 
Public Affairs; Mr. Krickus, Career Adviser. 

Political science, basically the study of 
how various political systems work, offers 
courses ranging from urban politics and 
government to international politics. The 
Department also provides many outlets 
through which students can gain practical 
knowledge of the field, including visits 
to the Virginia state capital and to 
Washington, D.C., internships in govern- 
mental offices, and involvement in major 
political events, such as the United 
Nations' student conference. Like 
economics, political science is a good 
background for a career in law, urban 
planning, teaching, government and private 
enterprise; it also lends itself to further 
study in graduate school. 



Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 101, 102: 24 additional 
credits in Political Science courses including 
301 , 302, two from among 441 , 442, 443 

Recommended: Computer Science and 
Statistics. 

101 — Introduction to Political 
Science I (3) (S) 

Survey of the basic concepts and theories 
of political science from antiquity to the 
present, including contemporary analytical 
techniques. 

102 — Introduction to Political 
Science II (3) (S) 

Continuation of Political Science 101, with 
primary emphasis on modern comparative 
political analysis and international relations. 

201, 202 — American Government 

(3,3) (S) 

Principles of political science as applied to 
American national government, state govern- 
ment and local government. 

211 — Congress and the Political 
Process (3) (S) 

Analysis of the contemporary role of 
Congress in its relation to the Presidency, 
the federal bureaucracy, and pressure 
groups. 

212 — The American Presidency 

(3) (S) 

Analysis of the modern Presidency and its 
relationship to democratic theory. 

301 — Comparative Government I 

(3) (S) 

Comparative analysis of the governments 
of the United Kingdom, France, and West 
Germany. 

302 — Comparative Government II 

(3) (S) 

Comparative analysis of the governments of 
the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 

304 — Contemporary American 
Politics (3) (S) 

In-depth analysis of selected problems in 
contemporary American politics. 



311, 312 — Public Administration 

(3, 3) (S) 

The administrative control and a study of 
employment relations and personnel 
administration. 

321 — Theory of International 
Politics (3) (S) 

Analysis of contemporary theory of inter- 
national politics, including evaluation of the 
United Nations and other international 
organizations. 

322 — Problems in International 
Politics (3) (S) 

Analysis in depth of major contemporary 
problems in international politics. 

332 — Metropolitan Problems (3)(S) 

Analytical study of the problems of American 
cities and other areas. 

334 — Political Parties (3) (S) 

Structure and functions of political parties; 
conduct of elections; pressure groups 

341, 342 — Government Finance 

(3,3) (S) 

Expenditures and revenues of federal, state 
and local governments. 

350 — Political Modernization (3) 

Conceptual approach to the problem of 
political modernization 

354 — Politics of South and 
Southeast Asia (3) (S) 

Study of the Political development of India. 
Pakistan, Thailand, Laos. Cambodia, and 
Vietnam 

355 — Politics of North Africa and 
the Middle East (3) (S) 

Study of the political development of the 
nations of North Africa and the Middle East. 

356 — American Foreign Policy 

(3) * (S) 

Problems facing the United States in its 
search for national security and international 
stability 

357 — Soviet Foreign Policy (3) (S) 

Analysis of the foreign policy of the Soviet 
Union, including its conflict with China. 



62 



360 — The Theory and Practice off 
Revolution (3) (S) 

Comparative analysis of the writings of major 
theorists of revolution from various parts 
of the world. 

361 — Problems off Communism 

(3) (S) 

Study of the origins, development, and 
contemporary aspects of world communism. 

362 — Political Geography (3) (S) 

Study of geographic factors in world power 
and international affairs. 

422 — American Civil Liberties 

(3) (S) 

Intensive analysis of civil liberties in the 
United States, based primarily upon deci- 
sions of the Supreme Court. 

441 — History of Political Throught I 

(3) (S) 

Examination of the contributions of the 
great political theorists from Plato to Burke. 

442 — History of Political Thought II 

(3) (S) 

Examination of the contributions of modern 
political philosophies. 

443 — Modern Political Analysis 

(3) (S) 

Study of the theories and application of 
modern political analysis. 

471 — Political Science Seminar 

(3) (S) 

Emphasis on intensive reading with group 
discussion of the selections read. 

491 — Individual Study in Political 
Science (3) (S) 

Directed individual research on approved 
problems in political science. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Pre-Medical 

Mrs. Southworth, Career Adviser. 

Pre-medical students follow the regular 
degree program, majoring in any field, but 
in addition, with the assistance of the 
career adviser, select courses that are 
necessary to be considered for medical 
school and to prepare them for the medical 
college admissions test. Students planning 
to apply to a specific medical or dental 
school should carefully investigate the 
entrance requirements. Typically students 
complete the following science courses 
during the first two years: Biology 121, 122 

— General Biology; Chemistry 111, 112 — 
General Chemistry; Mathematics 111 — 
Mathematical Analysis or Mathematics 121 

— Calculus; Physics 201, 202 — General 
Physics; Chemistry 211, 212 — Organic 
Chemistry. In addition, students complete 
the competence and basic requirements and 
begin the major program. In the last two 
years, students complete the major 
program and may elect additional biology 
and chemistry courses to strengthen their 
science background. 



Psychology 



Department of Psychology; Mrs. Rabson, 
Career Adviser. 

The principal objective of the Department 
of Psychology is to provide sound course 
coverage of a variety of content areas 
in the field of psychology (i.e., the study 
of behavior). This coverage includes 
both traditional areas and those that 
represent more recent trends and theore- 
tical developments in the discipline. 

The Department offers both a B.S. and 
B.A. degree in psychology. The B.S. 
curriculum provides theory, methodology, 
and individual research experience most 
useful to the student planning graduate 
training in social science. The B.A. 
degree provides a separate methodology 
appropriate to entry-level jobs in psy- 
chology and individual experience with 
applied psychology. Each major is assigned 
a faculty adviser to help plan a program 
best suited to the individual. 



Career options available to majors include: 
teaching at the primary or secondary level 
(with an appropriate certification), social 
work, probation and parole, drug abuse 
counseling, and technical or counseling 
opportunities in a variety of mental health 
settings. Students interested in pursuing 
psychology as a long-range career will 
find the B.S. curriculum an excellent 
preparation for graduate study. 

Requirements for the Major 

B.A. Degree: In Major Subject: 30 credits in 
Psychology courses beyond 101, 102 
including 261 , 361 or 362, 421 , 470 and at 
least one course from each of the following 
groupings: (1 ) 31 0, 331 , 332; (2) 31 1 , 31 5, 
342, 301; (3) 345, 348, 394; (4) 307, 380, 
381. 

B.S. Degree: In Major Subject: 30 credits in 
Psychology courses beyond 101, 102 includ- 
ing 261 , 361 , 421 , 491 , and at least one 
course from each of the following groupings: 
(1 ) 31 0, 331 , 332; (2) 31 1 , 31 5, 342, 301 ; 
(3) 345, 348, 394; (4) 372, 373, 374. 

101, 102 — General Psychology 

(3, 3) (S) 

Fundamental principles of human behavior; 
biological antecedents; motivation; percep- 
tion; learning; individual differences; intelli- 
gence; and personality. Only in sequence. 

261 — Statistics and Research 
Methods (4) (S) 

Consideration of fundamental statistical 
topics with laboratory integration of data 
collection and data analysis. 

Psychology 1 01 and 1 02, or their equivalent, 
are prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level 
Psychology courses. 

301 — Social Psychology (3) (S) 

Individual behavior in a social context; 
socialization; attitudes, social perception, and 
behavioral interaction. 

307 — Computer Applications in the 
Social Sciences (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 361 or 362. BASIC 
programming, statistical packages and 
applications, computer simulation, and the 
general use of the computer as a research 
tool. 



63 



310 — Psychology of Exceptional 
Children (3) (S) 

Deviations in physical, intellectual and 
emotional development. Relevant theories, 
issues, and therapy programs. 

311 — Abnormal Psychology (3) (S) 

Examination of the major varieties of patho- 
logical behavior, explanatory models and 
modes of treatment. 

315 — Foundations of Clinical 
Psychology (3) (S) 

Theories and practices of the major schools 
of psychotherapy: psycho-analysis, client- 
centered, family systems, behavior modifi- 
cation, and community psychology. 

325S — Educational Psychology 

(3) (S) 

Both application and theory of learning and 
educational technology principles as they 
apply to the classroom setting 

331 — Developmental Psychology: 
The Infant and Child (3) (S) 

Development from conception through 
childhood. Developmental processes, 
theories, issues and relevant research. 

332 — Developmental Psychology: 
The Adolescent and Adult (3) (S) 

Theories of, and research on, personality, 
social, physical and intellectual characteris- 
tics from adolescence to death. 

342 — Psychology of Personality 

(3) (S) 

Personality structure, dynamics, develop- 
ment, and methods of research. 

345 — Psychology of Learning (3)(S{ 

Analysis of empirical and theoretical issues 
in learning. Both human and infrahuman 
topics will be considered. 

348 — Psychology of Motivation 

(3) (S) 

Primary and learned sources of motivation 
and their effects on behavior. Theory and 
data will be considered. 

361 — Inferential Statistics and 
Research Methods (4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261: In-depth 
coverage of data analysis techniques and 
inferential tests with laboratory integration 
of data collection and data analysis. 



362 — Applied Methods (4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. An overview 
of methods commonly used in applied 
psychological settings. Topics include basic 
clinical methods, data skills and organiza- 
tional interactions. 

372 — Experimental Psychology: 
Sensation and Perception (4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 361 or 362. A 
laboratory approach to the study of visual 
and auditory sensory and perceptual 
psychology, with emphasis on psycho- 
physical methods. 

373 — Experimental Psychology: 
Human Learning (4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 361 or 362. An 
examination of method, data and theory in 
human learning and memory research. 

374 — Experimental Psychology: 
Physiological Psychology (4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 361 or 362. Critical 
survey of physiological correlates of behavior 
emphasizing neurophysiological mechanisms 
in perception, motivation and learning plus 
methods of physiological investigation. 

380 — Psychological Tests and 
Measurements (4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 361 or 362. Theory 
of test construction and the interpretation 
and uses of tests. Test administration and 
techniques of handling data. 

381 — Applied Behavioral Analysis 

(4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 361 or 362. Study 
and experience with the principles of operant 
conditioning as applied to the modification 
of human and animal behavior. 

392 — Behavior Genetics (3) (S) 

Prerequisites: One year of biology and one 
year of psychology. Principles of genetic 
transmission, gene action, population struc- 
ture and evolutionary theory applied to 
problems in animal and human behavior. 

394 — Psychopharmacology (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: One year of biology or one 
year of chemistry. Introduction to principles 
of drug action in the body, drug effects on 
behavior and social psychology of drug use. 



421 — History of Psychology (3) (S) 

Survey of the historical antecedents of 
modern psychology 

470, 471 , 472, 473, 474 - Selected 
Topics in Psychology (3 each) 

Enduring and/or contemporary issues in 
psychology 

491 — Individual Research 

(1-4) (S) 

Prerequisite: Permission of departmental staff 
member. Empirical investigation and/or 
library research. Maximum of eight credit 
hours allowable toward fulfilling the major 
field requirement 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Public Administration 

Department of Economics, Business and 
Public Affairs; Mr. Fickett, Career Adviser. 

Public Administration involves the making 
and implementation of public policy. In 
large, complex, post-industrial societies, 
government bureaucracies are performing 
functions once the preserve of private 
enterprise, families, communities and 
voluntary organizations. The public 
administration major is designed to instruct 
the student in the assumptions and values 
that are the basis for public policymaking, 
the administration of public programs, 
the relationship between public admini- 
strators and elected officials, and the 
problems and prospects of holding both 
accountable for their actions. 

Public Administration prepares students 
for careers in government, law, teaching, 
business. Majors in public administration 
are uniquely qualified to participate in 
the college's internship program, gaining 
practical knowledge by working for 
local, state, and federal agencies and 
private organizations involved in public 
affairs. 



64 



Requirements for the Major 

Core Courses: 24 credits in Public Admin- 
istration courses including Business 
Administration 231 , 232, 300, Political 
Science 201 , 31 1 , 31 2, 401 , 402. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
related courses including Statistics 200. 

311, 312 — Public Administration 

(3,3) 

The administrative control and a study of 
employment relations and personnel 
administration. 

401 — Public Policy (3) 

An examination of the public policy-making 
process, including discussion of contempor- 
ary public issues and the adoption and 
implementation of solutions to public 
problems. The course will highlight the 
major actors in the policy-making process 
as well as the environment within which 
they work. 

402 — Comparative Public Policy 
and Administration (3) 

A comparative analysis of the policy and 
administrative process in selected industrial- 
ized and developing countries. Emphasis is 
placed on identifying the variables that 
account for similarities and differences in 
this process between and among countries. 

491 — Individual Study in Public 
Administration (3) 

Directed individual research on approved 
problems in political science. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Relig 



ion 

Department of Classics, Philosophy and 
Religion; Ms. Clark, Career Adviser. 

The Department of Religion acquaints 
students with ways of studying religion, 
the kinds of questions to be asked, and 
the kinds of answers which learning can 
and cannot yield. 



Departmental offerings focus on the 
history and theology of the Western 
religious tradition. The small size of 
the Department permits personal attention, 
encouragement of individual interests, and 
a high degree of flexibility. A guided 
research course, taken by all senior 
majors, involves a senior paper. 

The B.A. degree in religion equips students 
for graduate school or seminary study in 
religion, as well as in graduate programs 
in other fields. Career opportunities are 
not limited to those opened by further 
study. A religion major is a humanities 
student of broad cultural awareness trained 
to think, write, and express cogently, to 
enter into dialogue discerningly with 
diverse ideas and perspectives. Such train- 
ing is requisite to any career and is ulti- 
mately practical in life itself. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in Religion 
courses beyond the 100-level, of which at 
least 12 must be at the 300-level or above, 
including 401. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
related courses. 

105 — Introduction to Religion 

(3) (H) 

Various approaches to the study of religion, 
their significance and limits; Eastern and 
Western traditions in relation to contempor- 
ary concerns. 

1 1 1 — Introduction to Christian 
History (3) (H) 

Selected topics in the development of 
Christianity and its institutions from the birth 
of the church to the present. 

117 — Introduction to Christian 
Theology (3) (H) 

The "how" as well as the "what" of theology 
is explored in relation to basic doctrines 
and concepts. 

201 — Judaism (3) (H) 

Historical and religious development of 
Judaism from Biblical times to the present. 



202 — The Roman Catholic Tradition 

(3) (H) 

Historical and theological development of 
western Catholic Christianity through the 
Second Vatican Council. 

203 — The Protestant Tradition 

(3) (H) 

Historical and theological development of 
Protestant denominations and sects from 
the Reformation to the present. 

205 - The Hebrew Bible (3) (H) 

The history, literature and religion of ancient 
Israel. 

206 — The New Testament (3) (H) 

Historical-critical methods of study are 
introduced and applied in investigating New 
Testament sources, forms and theological 
motifs. 

21 7 - Primitive Religions (3) (H) 

Religions of non-literate peoples. Emphasis 
is on interpretation of myths, rituals and 
shamanism. 

220 — Studies in Suffering and Evil 

(3) (H) 

A theological and literary examination of 
theodicy: "If God is good, whence evil?" 
Emphasis on humor and death. 

231 — Special Studies in Religion 

(3) (H) 

Among topics taught at different times: 
Women, Sexuality, and the Western Religious 
Tradition; Mysticism East and West; Christian 
Ethics Today. 

271 — Studies in Faith and 
Literature (3) (H) 

Study of relationships between Christian 
faith and literary art in the context of con- 
temporary novels and plays. 

281 — The Religions of India (3) (H) 

Study of historical development and basic 
traditions of South Asian religions, especially 
Hinduism and Buddhism. 

282 — The Religions of China and 
Japan (3) (H) 

Study of historical development and basic 
traditions of East Asian religions, especially 
Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism. 



65 



306 — Early Christian Thought 

(3) (H) 

Theology of the early church with emphasis 
on the development of Trinitarian and 
Christological thought. 

313 — Modern European Theology 

(3) (H) 

Prerequisite: either Religion 111, 117, 202, 
or 203. Persons and problems of 20th 
century theology from Barth to Moltmann, 
from liberal to liberation theology. 

314 — American Theology (3) (H) 

Prerequisite: either Religion 111, 117, 202, 
or 203. Death of God, Secular, Black, 
Process and Play theologies are investigated: 
emphasis on present theological problems 
and possibilities. 

331 — Special Studies in Religion 

(3) (H) 

Among topics taught at different times: 
19th Century Theology, Protestant Refor- 
mation 

341 — Major Religious Thinkers 

(3) (H) 

Among thinkers studied in depth at different 
times: Augustine: Soren Kierkegaard: Elie 
Wiesel. 

401 — Guided Research (3) (H) 

Preparation of a senior paper under the 
direction of the Department. Required of 
all senior majors. 

491, 492, 493, 494 — Individual 
Study (3 each) (H) 

Individual work under the guidance of the 
Department. By permission of the Depart- 
ment. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Russian 

Department of Modern Foreign Languages: 
Mr Bozicevic, Career Adviser. 

See Modem Foreign Languages for state- 
ment of departmental goals and program. 

101-102 — Beginning Russian (6) 

Fundamentals of spoken and written Russian 



201-202 — Intermediate 
Russian (6) 

Prerequisite: Rus. 102 or equivalent. Review, 
completion of fundamentals, and reading. 

291 — Reading, Composition and 
Conversation (3) 

Prerequisite: Rus. 202 or equivalent. 
Alternate years; offered Fall 1980. 

300 — Phonetics, Morphology 
and Syntax (3) 

Sounds and transcription, structure, simple 
and compound sentences. Alternate years; 
offered Fall 1981 

3 1 5 — Russian Culture (3) (S) 

Survey of art, dance, folklore, geopolitics, 
institutions, literature, music, religion, screen, 
theatre. Conducted in English. Alternate 
years; offered Spring 1981. 

323 — Reading in Scientific 
Russian (3) (L) 

Prerequisite: Rus. 202 or equivalent. Texts 
and terminology in various disciplines. 
Alternate years; offered Spring 1981. 

324 — Readings in Commercial 
Russian (3) (L) 

Prerequisite: Rus. 202 or equivalent. 
Composing and typing business letters; 
Russian trade techniques. Alternate years; 
offered Spring 1982. 

395 — Russian Literature, XIX 
Century (3) (L) 

Literary masters from Pushkin to Chekhov. 
Alternate years; offered Fall 1980. 

396 — Russian Literature, XX 
Century (3) (L) 

Transition from old to new — from Gorky to 
Solzhenitsyn. Conducted in English. Alternate 
years; offered Spring 1981. 

397 — Dostoevsky and Tolstoy 

(3) (L) 

Reading and analysis of representative 
works. Alternate years; offered Fall 1981. 

481 — Russian Studies Seminar 

Interdisciplinary topics. 

491, 492 — Individual Study 

(3,3) (D 

Research on adviser-approved topic in 
language or literature. Not to duplicate any 
regular course. 



499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Russian Studies 

Department of Modern Foreign Languages; 
Mr Bozicevic, Career Adviser. 

An interdepartmental major, the Russian 
Studies program is area-oriented and 
includes study in Russian language and 
literature along with pertinent courses 
in economics, geography, music, history, 
political science, and sociology. It can 
be helpful to students seeking careers in 
government service, law, business, journal- 
ism, international affairs, and the natural 
sciences. A major in Russian Studies may 
also be combined effectively with any 
above-mentioned departmental majors 
or a foreign language major. 

Requirements for the Major 

Core Courses: 21 credits in core courses 
including six credits in upper-level Russian 
language courses (291 , 300. 323. 324); 
six credits in Russian literature (315. 395. 
396, 397); History 357, 358; Economics 
391 or Political Science 302. 

In Related Subjects: 15 credits in approved 
related courses. 



Sociology 



Department of Anthropology, Geography 
and Sociology; Mr Sletten, Career Adviser. 

The major program in sociology offers a 
strong grounding in the development of 
sociological theory and methods ot 
sociological research. Specific courses 
focus upon major aspects of social structure 
and social institutions. Individual study 
and research offers the student the possi- 
bility of working with faculty guidance in 
an area of special interest. Also available 
is internship experience in a community 
agency or organization with faculty and 
other professional supervision. 

As a body ot reliable knowledge and a 
method ot scientific investigation, soci- 
ology provides the student with insights 
into the nature ot culture, social struc- 
ture, and the development ot human 
personality. 



66 



Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 1 01 , 1 02; 24 credits in 
Sociology courses at the 300 and 400 level; 
up to six hours of upper-level anthropology 
may be substituted for Sociology courses. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
related courses in such fields as anthro- 
pology, psychology, history, political 
science, economics, statistics, linguistics 
and philosophy. 

Recommended: Computer Science and 
Statistics; Sociology 362, 471 , 472. 

1 01 — Principles of Sociology (3) (S) 

Basic characteristics of group life; status, 
role, social structure, culture and interaction 
between persons and groups. 

1 02 — Social Problems (3) (S) 

Social change, deviants, social and personal 
disorganization, mobility; delinquency, crime; 
political, industrial and other group conflicts. 

303 — Culture, Social Structure 
and Personality (3) (S) 

Impact of culture, social structure, and 
groups on individual attitudes and behavior. 
Alternate years; offered Spring 1 981 . 

304 — Social Stratification (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101. Analysis of 
inequality in society. Nature and effects 
of stratification in modern society. 

31 1 — Demography and Human 
Ecology (3) (S) 

Basic principles of social and formal 
demography. Relationship of social, 
economic and psychological factors on 
demographic processes. Alternate years; 
offered Spring 1 981 . 

312 — Comparative Community 
Studies (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101. Cross-cultural 
study of the impact of modernization, urban- 
ization, and political centralization on 
communities. Alternate years; offered 
Spring 1981. 

313 — Urban Sociology (3) (S) 

Common problems of city living, ecological 
factors in growth of cities and their influence 
upon social behavior. 



314 — Population Trends: Special 
Topics in Population (3) (S) 

Intensive treatment of selected special 
topics in population. Alternate years; offered 
Spring 1982. 

315 — Sex Roles and Society (3) (S) 

A sociological study of sexual differentiation 
in American Society, with an emphasis on 
major societal institutions and social change. 
Offered Fall 1980 and Spring 1982. 

331 — The Family (3) (S) 

American families: changing patterns and 
emerging alternatives, including mate selec- 
tion, marriage, divorce, child-rearing, single 
lifestyles, childlessness, communal living 
and socio-cultural variations. 

332, 333 — Introduction to Social 
Welfare (3, 3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101, 102. First 
semester foci: historical backgrounds, philo- 
sophies, values, goals, and issues of human 
welfare concerns; and social welfare as a 
social institution. Second semester foci: 
social work as a profession; fields, methods, 
policies, and consequences of social action 
or inaction. 

334 — Medical Sociology (3) (S) 

How disease and health relate to social 
structure and culture; correlates of diseases. 
Organization and role analysis of health 
professions. Alternate years; offered Spring 
1982. 

341 — American Society (3) (S) 

Overview of contemporary society; modifi- 
cations of the liberal progressive ideology 
and organization; changing male and female 
roles; growth of bureaucracy; work and 
leisure. Alternate years; offered Spring 1981. 

342 — Occupations and Social 
Structure (3) (S) 

Treatment of major occupational groups; 
special emphasis upon professions and 
executive roles, including relationships with 
other aspects of society. Alternate years; 
offered Spring 1982. 

351 — Juvenile Delinquency (3) (S) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101, 102. Socio- 
logical analysis of the nature, extent, causes, 
impact and treatment of juvenile delinquency. 
Alternate years; offered Fall 1 980. 



352 — Criminology (3) (S) 

Crime, its nature, types, extent and historic 
trends; causal theories, mythical and scienti- 
fic; programs of crime control, treatment 
and prevention. 

362 — Methods of Social Research 

(3) (S) 

Study design, observation, interviewing, 
questionnaire construction and administra- 
tion, survey research and analysis, and 
other topics. 

363 — Sociological Research: 
Data Analysis (3) (S) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101, Sociology 362, 
and Statistics 200. Analysis of data from 
sample surveys, census materials. Use of 
secondary data to prepare research reports. 
Alternate years; offered Spring 1982. 



402 — Sociology of Human 
Development (3) 



(S) 



The effect of factors such as social class, 
race, family, schools, religion and the mass 
media on children. Offered Fall 1981. 

421 — Human Relations (3) (S) 

American racial and ethnic groups; focus on 
Indians and Blacks; concepts of prejudice, 
discrimination, segregation, inter-group 
conflict, accommodation, cooperation. 
Alternate years; offered Spring 1982. 

422 — Sociology of Religion (3) (S) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or instructor 
approval. Social factors in development and 
function of institutions in world religions; 
chief focus on Judeo-Christian tradition. 
Alternate years; offered Spring 1981. 

431 — Sociology of the Aging (3)(S) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or 102 or 
Anthropology 101, or Psychology 101, or 
permission of instructor. Theories of aging, 
societal attitudes; other factors: demographic, 
status change, family relationships, and 
institutionalization of aged persons. 



442 — Social Change (3) 

Theories of social change and evolution; 
analysis of historical changes. Alternate 
years; offered Spring 1982. 



(S) 



67 



471 — History of Social Theory 

(3) (S) 

Presentation and analysis of major forms and 
themes of social and early sociological 
theory from Greece to the 20th century. 

472 — Contemporary Sociological 
Theories (3) (S) 

Major sociological theorists of the 20th 
century. 

488 — General Readings (3) (S) 

Usually one set of readings on some maior 
concepts or points of view in contemporary 
sociology with an emphasis upon discussion. 

489 — Special Readings (3) (S) 

One or several sets of readings and 
discussions from a sociological point of 
view. Student interest is important in 
selection of the topics. 

491, 492, 493, 484 - Individual 
Study and Research (3) (S) 

Available to qualified students. Reading and 
research; project or paper with guidance 
of a faculty member. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Spanish 



Department of Modern Foreign Languages; 
Mrs. Stephenson, Career Adviser. 

See Modern Foreign Languages for statement 
of departmental goals and program. 

Requirements for the Major 

In Major Subject: 24 credits in Spanish 
courses beyond 201-202, including 18 in 
literature (6 of which must be in Spanish 
American Literature) and 391, 392. 

In Other Subjects: 12 credits in approved 
courses in literature, in another language, 
or in the history, geography, or arts of 
the country of the language studied. 

101-102 — Beginning Spanish (6) 

Grammar, composition, conversation, 
reading, laboratory use. 



201 -202 — Intermediate Spanish (6) 

Grammar review, reading, oral work, 
laboratory use. 

201, 292 — Studies in Language I 

(3,3) 

Grammar, composition, conversation. 

315 — Spanish Civilization (3) (S) 

History, art, music, customs, traditions of 
Spain. 

316 — Spanish American 
Civilization (3) (S) 

History, art, music, customs, traditions of 
South America. 

321, 322 — Introduction to 
Spanish Literature (3, 3) (L) 

History and study of examples of Spanish 
literature from Middle Ages to present day. 

325 — Poetry of Spain (3) (L) 

Poetry from the 11th century to the contem- 
porary period. 

331 — Literature of the Middle Ages 
and Renaissance (3) (L) 

Poetry, drama, and prose of Spain from the 
1 1 th century to 1 550. Offered 1 980-81 

351 — Drama of the Golden Age 

(3) (L) 

Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de 
Alarcon, Guillen de Castro, Moreto, Calderon. 

352 — Prose of the Golden Age 

(3) (L) 

Pastoral novel, picaresque novel, shorter 
novels of Cervantes. 

362 — Spanish Literature of the 
Eighteenth Century (3) (L) 

Feijoo, Luzan, Villarroel, Padre de Isla, 
Samaniego. Iriarte, Moratin, Ramon de la 
Cruz. 

371 — Nineteenth Century Drama 

(3) (L) 

Romantic drama, "alta comedia," and 
theater of ideas. Offered 1980-81 

372 — Nineteenth Century Novel 

(3) (L) 

Valera, Alarcon. Pereda, Pardo Bazan, Alas, 
Palacio Valdes, Blasco Ibafiez. Perez Galdds. 
Offered 1981-82. 



375 — Spanish American Literature 
from the Colonial Period through 
the Period of Independence (3) (L) 

Offered 1980-81. 

376 — Spanish American 
Literature: Modernism (3) 

Poetry and prose of "modernismo. " 1888 
through the period of World War I Offered 
1980-81. 

381 — The Generation of '98 (3) (L) 

Includes Ganivet, Unamuno, Azorin, Baroja, 
Antonio Machado, Valle-lnclan. Ortega y 
Gasset, and others. 

382 — Twentieth Century Drama 

(3) (L) 

Includes Benavente, Garcia Lorca. Casona 
Buero Vallejo, Sastre, Arrabal, Mihura. 
Offered in 1981-82 

383 — Contemporary Spanish 
Prose (3) (L) 

Emphasis on post-Civil War authors and 
productions. Offered 1980-81 

385, 386 — Twentieth Century 
Spanish American Literature 
(3,3) (L) 

Novel, poetry, drama, 1900 to present. 
Offered 1981-82. 

391, 382 — Studies in Language II 
(3,3) 

Advanced grammar, composition, conver- 
sation. Required of majors. Offered 1981-82 

395, 396 — Spanish Literature in 
Translation (3, 3) (L) 

Taught in English. 



451 — Intensive Study of 
Cervantes (3) 

Principal emphasis on Don QuijOte. 



(L) 



471 — Intensive Study of GaldOs 

(3) (L) 

Emphasis on selected Galdos novels. 
Offered 1980-81. 

491, 492 - Individual Study 
(3,3) 

Intensive study of one or more authors 
selected by student in consultation with 
adviser. 



68 



499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 



Speech 



Department of English, Linguisitics, and 
Speech. 

The objectives of the courses in Speech 
are to enhance student skills in oral 
communication through theory and 
practice in reading and speaking; to 
increase student understanding of the 
structure of the spoken language; and to 
provide students with a basic knowledge 
of the anatomy and physiology underlying 
the speech mechanism. 

In addition to the specific pre-professional 
education afforded by the cooperative 
program, the Department provides students 
with the opportunity to increase their 
personal effectiveness in oral communica- 
tion, an integral component of most 
vocations on the professional and 
supervisory level. 

261 — Voice and Diction (3) (H) 

Theory and practice of principles necessary 
to speech improvement. Individual analysis 
is offered to improve the student's voice, 
articulation, and pronunciation. 

300 — Organizational 
Communication (3) (S) 

A study of communication theory as it 
operates inside business and professional 
structures; an investigation of interpersonal, 
dyadic, small-group, and public communi- 
cation. 

301 — Group Discussion (3) (H) 

Philosophy and practice of group discussion 
as a means of problem-solving and the 
exercise of group leadership. Alternate 
years; offered 1981-82. 

302 — Public Speaking (3) (H) 

A study of the art of public speaking; the 
composition, organization and delivery of 
speeches of various types. Alternate years; 
offered 1981-82. 



331 — Oral Interpretation (3) (H) 

Interpretation of prose, poetry and dramatic 
literature in terms of its intellectual, emotional 
and aesthetic content. 

361 — Voice Science (3) (S) 

A study of the anatomical, physiological 
and neurological functioning of the speech 
and hearing mechanisms. Alternate years; 
offered 196J-81. 

362 — Phonetics (3) (S) 

A study of American dialects and standards 
of speech employing the International 
Phonetic Alphabet. Alternate years; offered 
1980-81. 

491, 492 - Individual Study 

(3,3) (H) 

Individual study under the direction of a 
member of the staff. By permission of the 
Department. 

499 — Internship 

Supervised off-campus experience, devel- 
oped in consultation with the Department. 
Credits variable. 

Speech Pathology and 
Audiology 

Department of English, Linguistics, and 
Speech; Mr. Duke, Career Adviser. 

A major program in speech pathology 
and audiology is offered in cooperation 
with the University of Virginia. Students 
complete three years at Mary Washington 
College, spend the senior year in resi- 
dence at the University of Virginia, and 
receive their degrees from Mary Wash- 
ington College. Full details on this 
program are available from the 
Chairperson. 

Requirements for the Major 

At Mary Washington College: Speech 361 , 
362 and two of the following: 261, 301, 302, 
331 , 332. 

At University of Virginia: 30 credit hours 
of which at least 24 must be in the major 
field. 

Recommended: Psychology 31 1 , 331 , 362 

and Linguistics courses. 



Statistics 

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
and Physics. 

The Department of Mathematical Sciences 
and Physics offers a variety of courses 
in statistics which provide a rational basis 
for inferential reasoning and emphasize the 
ability to reason statistically. They lay 
the groundwork for understanding institu- 
tional decision-making processes, quality 
of information, and effective use of 
common statistical tools. 

Many students take statistics courses to 
strengthen understanding of the quanti- 
tative aspects of other disciplines. These 
courses also help to broaden career 
opportunities. 

100 — Survey of Statistics (3) 

Survey of statistical reasoning and its 
application intended for non-scientists. 
Application of statistics are illustrated using 
case histories from diverse fields. 

200 — Introduction to Statistics 

(3) (N/M) 

First course in statistical methods. Both 
parametric and nonparametric techniques. 
Examples from diverse fields. 

321 — Introduction to Mathematical 
Statistics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Math 221. A calculus based 
mathematical statistics course with special 
emphasis on applications in computer 
science. 

401, 402 — Introduction to 
Probability and Statistical 
Inference (3, 3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Math 231. Careful introduction 
to probability theory and theoretical statis- 
tics including both classical and Bayesian 
approaches to estimation and testing 
problems. 

420 — Readings in Experimental 
Statistics (3) (N/M) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
General linear models, experimental design 
and analysis, other topics as required. 



Campus Map 



69 



1 GEORGE WASHINGTON 
HALL 
Administration Hall 

2 WESTMORELAND HALL 
Residence Hall 

3 HAMLET HOUSE 
Residence Hall 

4 FAIRFAX HOUSE 
Alumni House 

FAIRFAX ANNEX 
Student Government 

5 MADISON HALL 
Residence Hall 

6 MARY BALL HALL 
Residence Hall 

7 CUSTIS HALL 
Residence Hall 

8 CHANDLER HALL 
Academic Hall 



9 SEACOBECK HALL 
Dining Hall 

10 GOVERNMENT POST 
OFFICE 

11 MELCHERS HALL 
Academic Hall 

12 duPONT HALL 
Academic Hall 

13 HEATING PLANT 

14 POLLARD HALL 
Academic Hall 

15 ATHLETIC FIELDS 

16 GOOLRICK HALL 
Gymnasium 

17 HUGH MERCER 
Health Center, and 
Counseling Center 



18 WILLARD HALL 
Residence Hall 

19 MONROE HALL 
Academic Hall 

20 VIRGINIA HALL 
Residence Hall 

21 LEE HALL 

Student Activities 

22 TRINKLE LIBRARY 

23 AMPHITHEATER 

24 MARYE HALL 
Spanish House 

25 MASON HALL 
Residence Hall 

26 RANDOLPH HALL 
Residence Hall 

27 BUSHNELL HALL 
Residence Hall 



28 COMBS SCIENCE HALL 
Academic Hall 

29 JEFFERSON HALL 
Residence Hall 

30 BRENT HALL 
French House 

31 RUSSELL HALL 
Residence Hall 

32 FRAMAR HALL 
Residence Hall 

33 MARSHALL HALL 
Residence Hall 

34 TRENCH HILL 
Residence Hal! 

35 BROMPTON 
President's Home 

36 MAINTENANCE 



Mary Washington College 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 




•a rut cnouno- 



Directory 



The Corporation 

The Rector and Visitors of 
Mary Washington College 

The Officers of the Visitors 

Katherine Edmondson Hopper, Rector 
Gwendolyn Amory Cumming, I 'ice Rector 
Irene Lundy Brown, Secretary 

The Visitors of the College 

Arabelle Laws Arrington ('41), Warrenton 

Joseph Earl Blackburn, Potomac, MD. 

Irene Lundy Brown ('39), Poquoson 

John G. Casties, Corbin 

Gwendolyn Amory Cumming ('52), Hampton 

Warner N. Dalhouse, Roanoke 

Katherine Edmondson Hopper ('29), Fairfax 

Helen Wilkins Obenshain ('56), Richmond 

Stanley Albert Owens, Manassas 

J. Rupert Picott, Richmond 

Sue Roberson Smith ('76), Raleigh, N.C. 

Lewis Meriwether Walker, Jr., Petersburg 



Administration 



Office of the President 

Prince B. Woodard, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., L.L.D., 
President 

Anne A. Moyse, Secretary to the President 

Linda N. Bailey, Secretary, Office of the President 

Office of the Executive Vice President 

William M. Anderson, Jr., B.S., M.P.A., Ed.D., 
Executive I 'ice President 

Betsy J. Chinn, A.S., Secretary to the Executive 
Vice President 

Linda N. Evans, B.A., Director of Information 
Services 

Edward H. Littlefield, B.S., Director of Personnel 

Daniel W. Bishop, Chief of College Police 

Office of the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs and Dean 

Mary Ann T. Burns, B.A., A.M., Ph.D., 
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean 

Vera M. Jacobs, Secretary to the Vice President 
for Academic Affairs and Dean 

Roy B. Weinstock, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate 

Dean for Academic Services 

Donald E. Glover, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
Director of Graduate Studies 

Ronald B. Head, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
Assistant Dean for Career Services 

Margaret T. Ball, B.A., M. Ed., 
Academic Counselor 

Mary I. Kemp, B.A., Administrative Assistant 

Office of the Vice President for 
Continuing Education 

A. Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., 
I 'ice President for Continuing Education 

Lucretia H. Oesterheld, Secretary to the 
Vice President for Continuing Education 

Nancy O. Carter, Recorder, Office of Student Records 



Office of the Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Aid 

H. Conrad Warlick, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., 
Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Susan H. Talley, Secretary to the Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Aid 

G. Forrest Dickinson, Jr., B.A., Assistant Dean of 
Admissions and Financial Aid 

Sallie F. Washington, B.A., Assistant Dean of 
Admissions and Financial Aid 

Martin A. Wilder. Jr., B.A., M.Ed., 
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Office of the Vice President for Business and 
Finance 

Gloria S. Day, Secretary to the Vice President for 
Business and Finance 

Lester E. McMenamin.Jr., B.S., B.C.E., M.S.C.E., 

Director of the Physical Plant 

Ross C. Chaimson, B.A., M.S., Assistant Director 
of the Physical Plant 

Warren T. Leback, B.A., M.L.A., 
Landscape Superintendent 

Carolyn S. Taylor, B.S., M.S., Manager, Bookstore 

Office of the Dean of Students 

Suzanne E. Gordon, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 

Dean of Students 

Claire Talley Booker, Administrative Assistant 

Catherine B. Wegner, B.A., M.S., Assistant Dean 
of Students 

George W. Edwards, A.B., M.Ed., Assistant Dean 
of Students 

Betty L. Luttrell, Administrative Assistant 

Mary A. K. Kelly, B.A., M.A., Director of 
Counseling Center 

A. Isabel Gordon, Director of Career Placement 

lima M. Overman, B.S., M.D., College Physician 

Raymond S. Jones, B.S., M.B., Associate Physician 

Louis B. Massad, B.S., M.D., Associate Physician 

Virginia H. Cullen, R.N., Head Xurse 



71 



Library 

Ruby Y. Weinbrecht, B.A., M.A., Librarian 

Sherry C. Morgan, Secretary to the Librarian 

Charles D. Balthis, B.A., M.S.L.S., Head Calaloger 

John P. Bissett, B.A., M.S.L.S., Head, 
Technical Services 

Renna H. Cosner, A.B., A.M.L.S., Acquisitions 
Librarian 

Catharine K. Hall, B.A., M.L.S., Readers Services 
(Reference) 

Sheila M. McGarr, B.A., M.S.L.S., Readers 
Services (Circulation) 

Office of Development 

George E. Ball, A.B., Director of Development 

Carolyn S. George, Secretary to the Director of 
Development 

Office of the Alumni Association 

Mary B. Carson, B.A., Director of Alumni Affairs 

Fannie M. Ellis, Secretary to the Director of 
Alumni Affairs 



Emeriti 

President Emeritus 

Grellet C. Simpson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., L.L.D., 

Litt.D., L.H.D. 

President Emeritus and Professor Emeritus of 

English 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Virginia; L.L.D., Randolph-Macon 

College; Litt.D., Flagler College; L.H.D., Mary 

Washington College 

Dean Emeritus 

James H. Croushore, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Dean Emeritus and Professor Emeritus of English 
B.A., M.A., Lehigh University; Ph.D., 
Yale University. 

Faculty Emeriti 

Philip J. Allen, A.B., M.A., B.D., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Sociology 

A.B., Ohio Northern University; M.A., 

Northwestern University; B.D., Garrett 

Theological Seminary; Ph.D., The American 

University. 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., L.H.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Education 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia; 
L.H.D., Mary Washington College. 

Margery E. Arnold, B.A., M.A. 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Health, Physical 

Education and Recreation 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., Columbia 

University. 

Rachel J. Benton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 

B.A., De Pauw University; M.A., Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa. 

Julien Binford 
Professor Emeritus of A rt 

Graduate, Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson 
Fellowship for study in France, Virginia Museum 
Senior Fellowship, Rosenwald'Fellowship. 
Represented in permanent collections of Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts, University of Georgia, 
University of Nebraska, Art Institute of Fine 
Arts, Springfield Museum, New Britain 
Museum, Oberlin College and others. 

Zoe W. Black, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Biology 
B.A., University of Tennessee; A.M., Ph.D., 
Duke University. 



Mildred M. Boiling, A.B., A.M. 
Professor Emeritus of Modern Eoreign Languages 
A.B., Colorado College; A.M., University of 
Missouri, diploma, Institut de Phonetique, 
University of Paris. 

Stanley F. Bulley, L.R.A.M. Mus. Bac, 

Mus. Doc. 

Professor Emenlus of Music 

L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of Music; Mus. 

Bac, Mus. Doc, University of Toronto. 

William A. Castle, B.S., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Biology 

B.S., Denison University; Ph.D., University of 

Chicago. 

Marion K. Chauncey, B.M., M.A. 
Associate Professor Emeritus of Music 
Graduate, Georgia State Woman's College; 
B.M., Ithaca Conservatory of Music; M.A., 
Columbia University. 

Eileen K. Dodd, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Psychology 
Ph.B., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Ph.D., 
New York University. 

Jean Slater Edson, A.B., M.A. 

Professor Emeritus of Music 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Columbia 

University. 

E. Boyd Graves, A.B., A.M., Ed.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 
A.B., A.M., College of William and Mary; 
Ed.D., George Washington University. 

William W. Griffith, A.B., B.S. in L.S.. M.A., 
Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of English 
A.B., University of Pennsylvania; B.S. in L.S., 
Drexel Institute; M.A., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Anne F. Hamer. B.M., M.M. 

Associate Professor Emenlus of Music 

B.M., University of Michigan 

MM., The Catholic University ot America. 

Margaret Hargrove, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., L.H.D. 

Professor Emenlus of Classics 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; A.M. 

Ph.D., Cornell University; L.H.D.. Lake Erie 

College. 

Henry W. Hewetson, B.A.. M.A . Ph.D 

Professor Emeritus of Economics 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A.. University 

of British Columbia; Ph.D., University ot 

Chicago. 

Catherine H. Hook, B.S.. MED. 
Associate Professor Emeritus of Education 
B.S., Madison College; M.E.D., University 
of Virginia. 



"2 



Lev-.- Hrus:c~. ... 3. A 
Associate Professor Emeritus of Music 
B.A.. Virginia Military Institute. 

Anna S. Hove. A.B.. M.S.. Ph.D. 
*■:':.: • E-y-r::.: r 5 . :p 
A.B.. Lynchburg College; M.S., Ph.D.. 
University of Wisconsin. 

Earl G. Insley, B.S., Ph.D. 

."-.:.. - £■::—:... . ' !■■■:•■■■ :—. 

B.S.. Ph.D.. Tohns Hopkins University. 

Edwin H. Jones, B.A., MA., Ph.D. 

."-. ■■:•;. - E :■:-.: : " lEir- ':■-: ;•: Es\;.^r;; 
B.A., Hampden-Sydney College: M.A., Duke 
University; Ph.D.. University of Virginia. 

Walter B. Kelly. B.S.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

"•:":_::■ E :'-".' ' E-.: :■■: 

B.S.. Ursinus College: M.A., Ph.D., University 

: : ?e"_r.\vi— a 

Pauline G. King, B.S., MA.. Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Art 

B.S.. Mary Washington College; M.A.. George 

Peabody College: Ph.D.. University ot Chicago. 

Kurt F. Leidecker. B.A.. AM., PLD. 

"-■•:::. • E<- :—:.<; .-- ."•:: :.:r-:'. 

B.A.. KM.., Oberlin College: Ph.D.. University 

: Chicasc 

Almont Lindsey. B.S.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

"•.*■:'.".'."• E- ":-". : :E~ ;:.•-. 

B.S.. Knox College] A/„4., PLD., Uniivrsity 

.- ."..:■:::.•. 

George E. Luntz. BAI.. MAI.. PhD. 

"• :.: ' E :-:,: .-' .'._':._■:- 

B.M.. M_\i.. Dana School of Music; Ph.D.. 

State University of Iowa. 

Fred E. Miller, A.B., M.A. 

.- . .-.•: ."-. ■:-;_-■- E •-:"'".■: . ' £-'."•:."•»::."• 
A B . M.A.. Colorado State College of 

Claudia M. Read. B.S.. M.A. 

Professor Emeritus ofHeahh, Physical Education 

B.S.. Woman's College of the University ot 
North Carolina: M.A.. New York Universitv - . 

Carmen L. Rivera, B.A.. M.A., Ph.D. 

?-:'■•■ ■ ."■ ■:-. '■'. :. ■ •:"■-" 1- -; ■-".' 

B.A.. University of Puerto Rico: M.A., Florida 
State College for Women; Ph.D., University 

: : Sa.arr. -".- 

Laura V. Sumner. A.B.. M.A.. Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus oj Classics 
A.B.. Vassar College; MA., Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins Universitv - . 



Raiford E. Sumner. B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

.~- .: - £:-.. ;" .". ■ :..m c :::-::= 

B.A.. University of Tennessee: M.A.. University 

of Mississippi; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

Dorothy D. Van Winckel, B.S., M.A. 

?'."■■•:' E»:;-r:u> .- .-.-. 

B.S.. Universitv- of Tennessee; M.A., Peabody 

College. 

Reginald W. Whidden, B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 

'•:'■::::■ E":;r::<5 r E-.;.:: ■: 

B.A., M.A., McMaster Universitv" Ph.D.. 

Yale University. 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S. 

-. --.-- -. ~ ..--- ; E :-T": :- 
B.S.. Ohio State Universitv. 



Faculty 1 

J 

Ernest C. Ackei 

:-i :->: 

.-...: -. - : E'-.-a-: 
B.A.. Montclair 
Pennsylvania Sc 



B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 



E: 



M.A.. Ph.D. 



William M. Anderson, Jr., B.S., M.P.A., Ed.D. 

(1978, 1976) 

Professor, Executive I 'ice President 

B.S.. Virginia Commonwealth University; 

M.P.A.. West Virginia College of Graduate 

Studies: Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State University. 

Clavio F. Ascari, Dottore in L.L.M.M. 
(1979. 1965) 

'■:■.:. ■ - ' E -.-:■- E.'c.p: Ls- :.--■{: 
Dottore in Lettere Mondeme, Universita 
5 ::. - :r.: '•'.:.;- 

Bulent I. Atalay, B.S., M.S.. M.A., Ph.D. 
(1974, 1966) 

."- :■::: • :' E-:;.:: 

B.S.. M.S., Georgetown Universitv - : M.A.. 
By Decree) Oxford Universitv-; Ph.D.. 
Georgetown University. 

Roger W. Bailey, B.M.E., M.M.S. (1977, 1973) 
Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.E.. Westminster Choir College: M.M.S.. 
Temple Universitv - . 

Tames E. Baker, M.S., M.Ed.. DMA. 

(1976, 1965) 

Professor of Music 

B.S.. M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University: 

D.M.A.. The Catholic University of America. 

James M. Baley. B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1978, 1977) 

E ::-..:::■ :•: .-•:: :_ - ;r-: - . 
B.A., Universitv - of Connecticut; M.A., 
Universitv of Miami; Ph.D.. University of 
N :::.-. A::.::= 

George E. Ball, A.B. (1978, 1978) 

.-.;;:::--.: 7- ■:::■ E ■-:::■ " E ■: - .-":=•:: 
A.B.. Brown Universitv - . 

Margaret T. Ball. B.A.. M.Ed. (1979, 1979) 
Lecturer, Advising Counselor 
B.A., M.Ed.. Duke Universitv - . 

Charles D. Balthis, B.A.. M.S.L.S. (1969, 1969) 

.*■•.-—.•._-.-_•• EE:n Zis .::■- 

B.A.. Randolph-Macon; M.S.L.S., Catholic 

University of America. 

'The first date indicates the year when the 
present rank was attained; the second date the 
year when the individual was first appointed 



73 



Michael L. Bass, A. A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1977, 1968) 

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

A. A., Clinch Valley College; B.S., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Medical College of 

Virginia; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State University. 

J. Christopher Bill, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1980, 1972) 

Associate Professor oj Psychology 

A.B., College of the Holy Cross; M.S., 

University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Dartmouth 

College. 

John P. Bissett, B.A., M.S.L.S. (1980, 1980) 
Assistant Professor, Head, Technical Services, Library 
B.A., Florida State University; M.S.L.S., 
Florida State University. 

Porter R. Blakemore, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1979, 1979) 

Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., University of North Carolina; M.A., 

Madison College; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

Juliette B. Blessing, L. es L., D.E.S., Doct. U. 

(1980, 1957) 

Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

L. es L., University of Lille; D.E.S., University 

01 Paris; Doct. U., University of Dijon. 

Roger J. Bourdon, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1975, 1968) 

Professor oj History 

B.S., Loyola University; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of California at Los Angeles. 



Be 



B.Ed., M.A., Ph.D. 



Marshall E. 

(1975, 1965) 

Professor of Geography 

B.Ed., Plymouth Teachers College; M.A., 

Kent State University; Ph.D., Boston 

University. 

Joseph Bozicevic, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1973, 1961) 
Professor qj Modern Foreign Languages 
B.S., Juniata College; M.A., Middlebury 
College; Ph.D., Georgetown University. 

Nathaniel H. Brown. A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1972, 1961) 

Professor of Engligh 

A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Syracuse 

University; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Mary Ann T. Burns, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
(1979, 1979) 
Professor oj Glassies 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean 
B.A., Rosemont College; A.M., Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 



David W. Cain, A.B., B.D., M.A., Ph.D. 
(1978, 1970) 

Associate Professor of Religion 
A.B., Princeton University; B.D., Yak- 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Otho C. Campbell, B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 

(1979, 1968) 

Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Richmond College; M.A., The American 

University; Ph.D., The University of Virginia. 

L. Clyde Carter, Jr., B.A., M.Div., Ph.D. 

(1966, 1948) 

Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.Div., Union 

Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Elizabeth A. Clark, A.B., M.A.. Ph.D. 

(1973, 1964) 

Professor of Religion 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A.. Ph.D., Columbia 

University. 

Juanita H. Clement, B.A., M.A. (1973, 1969) 
Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Radford College; M.A., George Peabody 
College. 

Marjorie O. Collins, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
(1978, 1978) 

Assistant Professor of English & Linguistics 
B.A., University of Wales; M.A., Hunter 
College; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Joseph L. Conroy, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
(1977, 1977) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
A.B., Providence College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Duke University. 

C. Barrie Cook, M.D. 

Adjunct Lecturer 

Pathologist-Director, School of Medical 

Technology, Fairfax Hospital. 

Renna H. Cosner, A.B., A.M.L.S. (1979, 1959) 
Assistant Professor, Acquisitions Librarian 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; 
A.M.L.S., University of Michigan. 

Herbert L. Cover, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1966, 1949) 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

William B. Crawlev, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1975, 1970) 

Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Hampden-Sydncy College; M.A.. Ph.D., 

University of Virginia. 



Judith A. Crissman, B.A., Ph.D. (1980, 
Profei sot oj Chemistry 

B.A., Thiel College; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina 

Steven L. Czarsty, B.S.B.A., MBA., DBA.. 

(1979, 1978) 

Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S.B.A . University of Hartford; M.B.A.. 

University of Connecticut; DBA.. George 

Washington University 

Thomas V. Dagenhart, Jr., B.A., M.S. 

(1979, 1979) 

Instructor in Geology 

B.A., M.S., University of Virginia. 

Thomas J. Davies, B.A., M.A. (1978, 1978) 
Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.A., M.A., Brigham Young University. 

Daniel A. Dervin, B.S.. M.A., Ph.D. 

(1974. 1967) 

Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Creighton University; M.A., Ph.D.. 

Columbia University. 

Joseph C. DiBella, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. 

(1977, 1977) 

Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Rutgers College; M.A., M.F.A., Northern 

Illinois University; Certificate. Art Instruction 

Schools. 

G. Forrest Dickinson, Jr.. B.A. (1974, 1974) 
Instructor, Assistant Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Aid 
B.A., Washington and Lee University. 

Joseph G. Dreiss, B.A.. M.A. (1980, 1976) 
Assistant Professor ol Art 

B.A., Fairleigh Dickinson University: M.A.. 
Rutgers University; Ph.D.. State University 
of New York (Binghamton). 

Mildred A. Droste. B.S., M.Ed. (1967. 1954 
Associate Professor oj Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Longwood College; M.Ed.. Woman's 
College of University of North Carolina. 

Albert G. Duke. A.B.. M.A. (1969. 1952) 
Associate Professor oj English and Speech 
A.B., M.A., Syracuse University. 

George W. Edwards. A.B.. M.Ed. (1979, 1979) 
Instructor, Assistant Dean ot Students 
A.B., M.Ed.. West Georgia College 

Samuel T. Emory, [r., A.B., M.A.. Ph.D 

(1968, 1959) 

Professor oj < Geography 

A.B.. M.A., University of North Carolina: 

Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 



74 



Lewis P. Fickett, Jr., A.B., L.L.B., M.P.A., 

Ph.D. (1968, 1963) 

Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Bowdoin College; L.L.B., M.P.A., Ph.D., 

Harvard University. 

Martha V. Fickett, B.A., M.M. (1972, 1968) 
Instructor in Music 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.M., 
University of Michigan. 

Victor A. Fingerhut, B.A., M.A. (1971, 1967) 
Associate Professor of Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Yale University. 

Delmont F. Fleming, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1978, 1966) 

Professor of English 

B.A., Eastern Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Janet L. Fraser, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1969, 1969) 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Leeds University; M.A., Bedford College, 

University of London; Ph.D., University of 

Georgia. 

Ruth T. Friedman, B.S., Ph.D. (1979, 1967) 

Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., Ph.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Stephen W. Fuller, B.S., Ph.D. (1977, 1972) 
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., University 
of New Hampshire. 

James C. Gale, M.D. 

Adjunct Lecturer 

Director, School of Medical Technology, 

Roanoke Memorial Hospitals. 

Constance A. Gallahan, B.S., M.S. (1979, 1977) 
Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Longwood College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee. 

John K. George, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. (1976, 1967) 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A.B., Columbia College; M.S., University of 
Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Suzanne M. Gill, B.S., M.Ed. (1978, 1978) 
Instructor in Education 

B.S., Madison College; M.Ed., University 
of Virginia. 



Donald E. Glover, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
(1973, 1961) 

Professor of English, Director of Graduate Studies 
B.S., College of William and Mary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Jeanne Chalifoux Goddin (1963, 1963) 

Instructor in Music 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music. 

Roy M. Gordon, B.A., M.S. (1978, 1977) 
Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.A., Harpur College of the State University 
of New York; M.S., Springfield College. 

Suzanne E. Gordon, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1979, 1979) 

Associate Professor, Dean of Students 

B.S., Youngstown State University; M.A., 

Kent State University; Ph.D., Florida State 

University. 

James B. Gouger, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1978, 1969) 

Associate Professor of Geography 

B.A., Montclair State College; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Florida. 

Jean C. Graham, B.A., M.M. (1977, 1977) 
Instructor in Dance 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.M., 
Florida State University. 

Roy F. Gratz, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1980, 1975) 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Ph.D., 
Duke University. 

Miriam J. Greenberg, B.S., M.Ed. (1967, 1953) 
Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.Ed., University of Maryland. 

Marilla M. Haas, B.A., M.M.Ed. (1978, 1978) 
Instructor in Music 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.M.Ed., 
Virginia Commonwealth University. 

Catharine K. Hall, B.A., M.L.S. (1978, 1978) 
Instructor, Readers Services Librarian (Reference) 
B.A., Goucher College; M.L.S., University 
of Maryland. 

Susan J. Hanna, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1979, 1968) 
Professor of English 

B.A., Ohio State University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Michigan. 

Richard E. Hansen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1976, 

1966) 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

Teruo Hara, B.A., M.A. (1972, 1968) 

Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., M.A., Tokyo Kyoiko University. 



Anna Mae Harris, B.A., M.A. (1963, 1958) 
Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., 
University of Virginia. 

Diane F. Hatch, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1979, 1966) 
Associate Professor of Classics 
A.B., Sweet Briar College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina. 

Sonja D. Haydar (1980, 1968) 

Associate Professor of Dance 

Professional Dance Certificate; Zagreb State 

Opera Ballet School, Yugoslavia; diploma, 

Meister Staten Fur Tranz, Berlin, Germany; 

Mozarteum Conservatory of Music, Salzburg, 

Austria. 

Ronald B. Head, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1978, 1978) 

Assistant Professor, Assistant Dean for Career 

Services 

B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Edward H. Hegmann, II., B.S., M.S., Ed.D. 
(1978, 1976) 

Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education, 
Director of Athletics and Physical Education Facilities 
B.S., Bucknell University; M.S., Springfield 
College; Ed.D., Temple University. 

Rosemary H. Herman, A.B., M.A. (1969, 1950) 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 
A.B., Woman's College of the University of 
North Carolina; M.A., University of North 
Carolina. 

Thomas R. Herrick, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1980, 1980) 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Margaret M. Hofmann, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1973, 1963) 

Professor of Modem Foreign Languages 

A.B., Wellesley College; M.A., University 

of New Hampshire; Ph.D., University of 

Kansas. 

Miriam B. Hoge, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1967, 1956) 

Professor of Modem Foreign Languages 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Joseph E. Holmes, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. (1974, 1968) 

Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., M.S., State University of New York 

at New Paltz; Ed.D., University of Virginia. 

John P. Johnson, B.S., M.F.A. (1976, 1968) 
Instructor in Education 
B.S., Virginia State College; M.F.A. , 
Howard University. 



75 



Rose Mary Johnson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1972, 1962) 

Professor oj Biological Sciences 

A.B., Hood College; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Virginia. 

Thomas L. Johnson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1973, 1959) 

Professor oj Biological Sciences 

B.A., Lynchburg College; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Virginia. 

Thomas W. Johnson, B.S., M.S., D.Sc. 
(1979, 1978) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.S., M.S., University of Virginia; D.Sc, 
George Washington University. 

Michael Joyce, B.A., M.F.A. (1980, 1980) 

Assistant Professor of Drama 

B.A., Loyola College; M.F.A., The Catholic 

University of America. 

Mary A. K. Kelly, B.A., M.A. (1974, 1947) 

Professor of Psychology, Director of the Counseling 

Center 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., 

Ohio State University. 

J. William Kemp, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1977, 1970) 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Mississippi 

State University; Ph.D., University of 

South Carolina. 

Roger L. Kenvin, A.B., M.A., M.F.A., D.F.A. 

(1972, 1959) 

Professor of Dramatic Arts 

A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Harvard 

University; M.F.A., D.F.A., Yale University. 

Meg S. Kintzing, B.S.P.E., M.Ed. (1978, 1975) 
Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S.P.E., M.Ed., Western Maryland College. 

John M. Kramer, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1977, 1971) 
Associate Professor of Political Science 
B.A., LaSal'le College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Virginia. 

Richard J. Knckus, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Science 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., 

University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Georgetown 

University. 

John L. Lamph, A. A., B.A., M.F.A. (1974, 1969) 
Associate Professor of Art 

A. A., Fullerton Junior College; B.A., California 
State College at Fullerton; M.F.A., Claremont 
Graduate School. 



Bernard C. Lcmoine, B.M., M.M., Ph.D. 

(1977, 1965) 

Professor of Music 

B.M., Oberlin Conservatory of Music; MM, 

University of Illinois; Ph.D., The Catholic 

University of America. 

Alexander J. Lindsey, B.S., MS, M.A., Ph.D. 

(1979, 1971) 

Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S., State University College; M.S., M.A., 

Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Gene Lohrke, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1979, 1979) 
Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.S., M.S., South Dakota State University; 
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

Bruce London, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1977, 1976) 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Bates College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Connecticut. 

David J. Long, B.M., M.M., DM. A. (1980, 

1980) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Arizona State University; M.M., D.M.A., 

North Texas State University. 

Carlton R. Lutterbie, Jr., B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1976, 1967) 

Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Chicago. 

Jo Ann Lutz, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1978, 1978) 
Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.A., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., 
Duke University. 

Bruce D. MacEwen, B.A.. M.A., Ph.D. 

(1979, 1969) 

Professor of Psychology 

B.A., LaVerna College; M.A., University of 

California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., Arizona State 

University. 

Bernard L. Mahoney. Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1973, 1964) 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University 

of New Hampshire. 

John C. Manolis, B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. (1977, 1964) 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 
B.A., Assumption University; M.A., Florida 
State University; diploma, Institut de Phonetique 
University Paris; Ph.D., Florida State 
University. 

Sheila M. McGarr, B.A., M.S.L.S. (1976, 1976) 
Instructor, Readers Services Librarian (Circulation) 
B.A., Merrimack College; M.S.L.S., Catholic 
University ot America. 



A. Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D. 

(1974, 1959) 

Professor of Education, I 'ice President for 

Continuing Education 

B.A., Emory and Henry College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 

University of Virginia. 

Sammy R. Merrill, B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 
(1977, 1973) 

Associate Professor of Modern Eoreign Languages 
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.A., Duke 
University; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Barbara S. Meyer, B.A., M.A . Ph.D. 

(1977, 1971) 

Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., Trinity University; M.A., University 

of Maryland; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Nancy H. Mitchell, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1973, 1960) 

Professor of English 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Yale 

University: Ph.D., The Catholic University 

of America. 

Sidney H. Mitchell. B.A.. MA.. Ph.D. 

(1967, 1954) 

Professor of English 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D.. 

University of Virginia. 

Thomas G. Moeller, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1973, 1973) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Marquette University; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Iowa. 

Paul C. Muick, B.F.A., A.M., Ph.D. (1973. 1964) 
Professor oj Art 

B.F.A., Ohio State University; A.M., University 
of Chicago; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Vera Niebuhr, B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1978, 1977) 
Assistant Professor of Modem Foreign Languages 
B.A., Douglass College; M.A. Ph.D.. 

University ot Wisconsin. 

Nikola M. Nikolic. B.S.. M.A . Ph.D. 

(1974, 1969) 

Professor of Physics 

B.S., Belgrade University; M.A., Ph.D., 

Columbia University. 

Denis Nissim-Sabat. B.A.. Ph.D. (1976, 1976) 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Case Western Reserve University; 
Ph.D., Temple University 

Patricia P. Norwood. B.M., M.M.. PhD 

(1979, 1977) 

Assistant Professor oj Music 

B.M.. Wheaton College; MM.. Ph.D., 

University ot Texas. 



_ 7 



Cornelia D. Oliver, B.A.. A.M., Ph.D. 
(1974, 1958) 

Professor of Art 

B.A., Smith College; A.M.. Duke Universirv; 

Ph.D.. The Catholic University of America. 

Joan T. Olson, B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1979, 1979) 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A.. Wheaton College: M.A., Michigan State 
University; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Richard P. Palmien, B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

(1977, 1977) 

Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.S., Boston State: M.A., University of Texas: 

Ph.D., University of California. 

Mary Jo Parrish. B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 1971, 1954) 
Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.A., M.A.. University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Aniano Peha. M.A., Ph.D. (1974, 1974) 
Assistant Professor of Modem Foreign Languages 
M.A.. Temple University: Ph.D.. Universirv' 
ot Pennsylvania. 

Man- Belle Pendleton. BA.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1980, 

1980) 

Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A.. University ot South Alabama: M.A.. 

Tulane University: Ph.D., Northwestern 

University. 

Patricia J. Pierce, B.A.. M.S. (1978, 1966) 
Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.A., University of Colorado; M.S., Oregon 
State University. 

Man- W. Pinschmidt. A.B.. A.M.. Ph.D. 

(1975, 1964) 

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

A.B.. Western Maryland College; A.M., Duke 

University: Ph.D.. Medical College of Virginia. 

William C. Pinschmidt, Jr., B.S.. M.S.. Ph.D. 

(1968. 1952) 

Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S.. Mount Union College: M.S.. Ohio State 

University-; Ph.D.. Duke University. 

Leena K. Puhakka. B.A.. M.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 

(1977, 1977) 

Assistant Protessor of Psychology 

B.A.. Knox College: M.A., M.A.. Ph.D.. 

The University ot Toledo. 

Joanna L. Quann, A.B.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1978, 1968) 
Assistant Professor of Modem Foreign Languages 
A.B., Wesleyan College: M.A.. Duke University; 
Ph.D.. George Washington University. 



Alice B. Rabson. A.B.. M.S.. Ph.D. (1978, 1969) 
Professor of Psychology 
A.B.. Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D.. 
Purdue University. 

Martha L. Randall, B.M., M.M. (1978. 1978) 

Instructor in Music 

B M . M M University ::" K;n = ;; 

Peggy K. Reinburg. B.A., M.M. (1972, 1966) 
Instructor in Music 

B.A, Mary Washington College; M.M.. 
Northwestern University. 

Peggy Riner, M.T. (ASCPi 

Adjunct Lecturer 

Education Coordinator. School of Medical 

Technology-. Roanoke Memorial Hospitals. 

Key S. Ryang. B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1972, 1968) 
Associate Professor of History 
B.A., Trinity University: M.A., Ph.D.. 
Columbia University. 

Robert S. Rvcroft, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1978,1977)' 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A.. College of William and Mary; M.A., 

Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 

Dawn R. Shupe. M.T. ASCP 

Adjunct Lecturer 

Education Coordinator. School ot Medical 

Technology. University of Virginia. 

Raman K. Singh. B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. ,1980. 1967) 
Professor of English 

B.A.. St. Stephen's College; M.A., Western 
Michigan University: Ph.D.. Purdue University. 

Paul C. Slayton, Jr.. B.S.. M.Ed.. Ed.D. 

(1974. 1965! 

Professor of Education and Director of Student 

Teaching and Public Education Sennces 

B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.. University of Virginia. 

Charles A. Sletten. B.A.. A.M.. Ph.D. 

(1967, 1958) 

Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Virginia: A.M.. Ph.D.. 

Harvard University. 

Roy H. Smith. B.S.. Ph.D. ri980. 1970) 
Professor of Psychology 

B.S.. University of Tennessee: Ph.D.. University 
ot Pennsylvania. 

Joanne G. Southworth, B.A.. Ph.D. (1977, 1972) 
Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.A.. Randolph-Macon Woman's College: 
Ph.D., Medical College of Virginia. 



Philip D. Spiess. II. B.A.. M.A., M.A. 

(1979, 1979) 

Instructor in History 

B.A., Hanover College: M.A., University of 

Delaware: M.A., Indiana University. 

Mary Ellen Stephenson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1964, 1948) 

Professor of Modem Foreign Languages 

B.A., Westhampton College: M.A.. Middlebury 

College: Ph.D.. University of Chicago. 

Laura V. Sumner. A.B.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

(1963, 1948) 

'•:sss:- r Classics 

A.B.. Vassar College: M.A.. Ph.D.. Johns 

Hopkins University. 

Glen R. Thomas. B.A.. M.A., Ph.D. (1974, 1962) 
Professor of American Studies 

B.A., Stanford University: M.A.. The American 
University: Ph.D.. Emory Universirv-. 

Arthur L. Tracy, B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1975, 1968) 
Associate Professor of History 
B.A.. Barnngton College: M.A.. Ph.D.. The 
American University. 

James F. Tucker. B.S.. M.S.. Ph.D. (1978, 1975) 
Lecturer in Economics 

B.S., M.S., Howard University: Ph.D.. 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Victor G. Tupitsyn, M.A., Ph.D. (1980, 1980) 
Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
M.A., Moscow State University; Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Stony Brook. 

Joseph C. Vance, B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. (1967, 1960) 

Professor of History 

B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D.. University of Virginia. 

George M. Van Sant. A.B.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

(1967, 1958) 

Professor of Philosophy 

A.B.. St. John's College; M.A.. Ph.D.. 

University of Virginia. 

Jacquelyn M. Vawter. B.S.Ed., M.Ed.. Ph.D. 

(1974, 1972) 

Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S.Ed., Illinois State University: M.Ed.. Ph.D., 

University of Man-land. 

Brenda E. Vogel, B.F.A.. M.A.. Ed.D. 

(1977, 1977) 

Assistant Professor of Education 

B.F.A.. Virginia Commonwealth University: 

M.A., Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State Universirv. 



H. Conrad Warlick, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. 

(1978, 1974) 

Professor of Education, Dean of Admissions and 

Financial Aid 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., University of North 

Carolina; Ed.D., University of Virginia. 

Richard H. Warner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1978, 1968) 

Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Dartmouth College; M.A., Ph.D., 

New York University. 

Sallie F. Washington, A.S., B.A. (1978, 1978) 
Lecturer, Assistant Dean oj Admissions and 
Financial Aid 

A.S., Germanna Community College; B.A., 
Mary Washington College. 

Catherine B. Wegner, B.A., M.S. (1978, 1978) 
Instructor, Assistant Dean of Students 
B.A., Newcomb College of Tulane; M.S., 
American University. 

Ruby Y. Weinbrecht, B.A., MA. (1972, 1972) 
Professor, Librarian 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., 
George Peabody College. 

Roy B. Weinstock, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1974, 1968) 

Professor of Psychology, Associate Dean for Academic 

Services 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Hollins 

College; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Jan S. White, B.A., M.A. (1977, 1977) 
Instructor in Music 

B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Arizona 
State University. 

Martin A. Wilder, Jr., B.A., M.Ed. (1979, 1979) 
Instructor, Assistant Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Aid 
B.A., M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

Margaret H. Williamson, B.A., B. Litt., 

D.Phil. (1974, 1974) 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., BrynMawr College; B.Litt., D.Phil., 

Oxford University. 

Michael R. Wills, M.D., Ph.D. 
Adjunct Lecturer 

Director, Clinical Laboratories 
University of Virginia. 

David E. Winn, A.B., M.A. (1977, 1977) 

Instructor in Classics 

A.B., M.A., College of William and Mary. 

Lawrence A. Wishner, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1968, 1961) 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 



Prince B. Woodard, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., L.L.D. 

(1974, 1974) 

Professor of Education, President 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute; M.A., Ed.D., 

University of Virginia; L.L.D., West Virginia 

Wesleyan. 

Rebecca T. Woosley, A.B., B.S., M.S. 
(1963, 1950) 

Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education 
A.B., Woman's College of the University of 
North Carolina; B.S., Mary Washington 
College; M.S., Louisiana State University. 

Kathryn F. Wright, M.T. (ASCP) 
Adjunct Lecturer 

Education Coordinator, School of Medical 
Technology, Fairfax Hospital. 

Janet G. Zeleznock, B.S., M.A. (1975, 1967) 
Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences 
B.S., St. Francis College; M.A., Duquesne 
University. 

Benjamin F. Zimdars, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1972, 1965) 

Professor of History 

B.A., North Central College; M.A., University 

of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Paul M. Zisman, B.A., M.A.T., Ph.D. 

(1977, 1971) 

Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., College ot William and Mary; M.A.T., 

Howard University; Ph.D., The Catholic 

University of America. 




Index 



13 Academic Policies 
70 Administration 

19 Admission 

21 Advanced Placement 

17 Advising, Academic 

6 Alternate Degree 
Program 

32 American Studies 

33 Anthropology 

10 Anthropology, Geog- 
raphy and Sociology, 
Dept. of 

19 Application for 
Admission 

10 Art, Dept. of 

33 Art History 

34 Art — Studio 

18 Athletics 

14 Attendance 

18 Audio- Visual Center 
8 Awards for Academic 

Achievement 
5 Bachelor of Arts degree 

7 Bachelor of Liberal 
Studies degree 

5 Bachelor of Science 
degree 

6 Bachelor of Science in 
Medical Technology 
degree 

10 Biological Sciences, 
Dept. of 

35 Biology 

37 Business Administration 
79 Calendar 

69 Campus Map 

17 Career Counseling 

38 Chemistry 

10 Chemistry and Geology, 
Dept. of 

39 Classics 

10 Classics, Philosophy and 
Religion, Dept. of 

18 Clubs 

39 Computer Science 
5,10 Cooperative Majors 



18 Counseling Center 
32 Courses of Study 

13 Course Load 

15 Credit-by-Examination 

40 Dance 

8 Dean's List 

5 Degree requirements 

5 Degrees 

10 Departmental Majors 
70 Directory 

41 Drama 

10 Dramatic Arts and 
Dance, Dept. of 

42 Economics 

10 Economics, Business and 
Public Affairs, Dept. of 

43 Education 

10 Education, Dept. of 

7 Electives 

31 Employment, Student 

44 English 

11 English, Linguistics and 
Speech, Dept. of 

47 Environmental Earth 

Sciences 
72 Faculty 
24 Fees and Assistance 

27 Financial Aid 

47 French 

48 Geography 

49 Geology 

50 German 

14 Grading 

8 Graduate Studies 

28 Grants 

50 Greek 

11 Health and Physical 
Education, Dept. of 

59 Health Education 

12 Health Sciences 

51 Historic Preservation 
51 History 

11 History and American 
Studies, Dept. of 

13 Honor System 

18 Intercollegiate Athletics 



5,10 
53 
11 
53 
12 
54 
12 
16 
17 
54 
54 
56 

30 

5,10 

69 

8 

11 

54 

21,22 

55 

11 

56 
11 
58 
57 
56 

57 
24 
24 
15 
58 
58 
59 
60 
61 
12 
12,62 
15 
5 
62 
11 



Interdisciplinary Majors 

International Affairs 

Internships 

Italian 

Junior Year Abroad 

Latin 

Law 

Leave of Absence 

Library 

Library Science 

Linguistics 

Literatures in 

Translation 

Loans 

Major Programs 

Map of Campus 

Master of Arts in 

Liberal Studies degree 

Mathematical Sciences 

and Physics, Dept. of 

Mathematics 

Medical Examinations 

Medical Technology 

Modern Foreign 

Languages, Dept. of 

Music 

Music, Dept. of 

Music, Education 

Music, Performance 

Music, History and 

Literature 

Music, Theory 

Non-Residential Fees 

Part-time Students 

Pass/Fail Option 

Performing Arts 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Political Science 

Pre-Law Program 

Pre-Medical Program 

Probation 

Program of Studies 

Psychology 

Psychology, Dept. of 



63 Public Administration 

14 Quality Point Average 
28 Refund fees 

15 Registration 

64 Religion 

6 Residence Requirements 
24 Residential Fees 

65 Russian 

65 Russian Studies 
28 Scholarships and Grants 
7, 25 Senior Citizens 

7 Servicemen's Oppor- 
tunity College 

65 Sociology 

67 Spanish 

6 Special Degrees 
11 Special Programs 
19 Special Students 

68 Speech 

12,68 Speech Pathology and 

Audiology 
3, 18 Sports 
68 Statistics 
3 Student Handbook 
13 Summer School (Session) 
13 Support Services 

15 Suspension 

12,43 Teacher Certification 
15,21 Transfer Credit 

16 Withdrawal 



o 


aid 


ndur 






79 


1980-1981 


IM m^b^i 


KM^w-mM-M. 


1981-1982 






First Semester 1980 




First Semester 1981 




Saturday 


August 23 


Residence halls open at 9 a.m. for new 
freshmen and transfer students. Student 
Association Orientation for all new students 
begins at 7 p.m. 


Saturday 


August 29 


Residence halls open at 9 a.m. for new 
freshmen and transfer students. Student 
Association Orientation for all new students 
begins at 7 p.m. 


Sunday 


August 24 


Residence halls open at 9 a.m. for returning 
students 


Sunday 


August 30 


Residence halls open at 9 a.m. for returning 
students. 


Sunday 


August 24 


Registration for late admissions, unregistered 
returning students, part-time and special 
students from 3-8 p.m. 


Sunday 


August 30 


Registration for late admissions, unregistered 
returning students, part-time and special 
students from 3-8 p.m. 


Monday 


August 25 


Classes begin 


Monday 


August 31 


Classes begin 


Fri.-Sat. 


September 19-2C 


Family Weekend 


Fri.-Sat. 


September 25-26 


Family Weekend 


Friday 


October 10 


Mid-semester vacation begins at 5 p.m. 
Residence halls close at 7 p.m. 


Friday 


October 9 


Mid-semester vacation begins at 5 p.m. 
Residence halls close at 7 p.m. 


Wednesday 


October 15 


Mid-semester vacation ends at 8 a.m. 
Residence halls open at 1 p.m. Tuesday, 
October 14 


Wednesday 


October 14 


Mid-semester vacation ends at 8 a.m. 
Residence halls open at 1 p.m. Tuesday, 
October 13 


November 10-25 


Registration for second semester 


November 9-24 


Registration for second semester 


Wednesday 


November 26 


Thanksgiving holiday begins at 12:05 p.m. 
Residence halls close at 2 p.m. 


Wednesday 


November 25 


Thanksgiving holiday begins at 12:05 p.m. 
Residence halls close at 2 p.m. 


Monday 


December 1 


Thanksgiving holiday ends at 8 a.m. 
Residence halls open at 1 p.m., Sunday, 
November 30 


Monday 


November 30 


Thanksgiving holiday ends at 8 a.m. 
Residence halls open at 1 p.m., Sunday. 
November 29 


Fri.-Sat. 


December 5-6 


Reading days 


Fri.-Sat. 


December 11-12 


Reading days 


Mon.-Sat. 


December 8-13 


Examinations 


Mon.-Sat. 


December 14-19 


Examinations 


Saturday 


December 13 


Residence halls close at 7 p.m. 


Saturday 


December 19 


Residence halls close at 7 p.m. 








Second Semester 1982 




Second Semester 1981 




Sunday 


January 17 


Residence halls open at 9 a.m. 


Sunday 


January 11 


Residence halls open at 9 a.m. 


Sunday 


January 17 


New student advising and registration 


Sunday 


January 11 


New student advising and registration 






2-5 p.m. 






2-5 p.m. 


Monday 


January 18 


Classes begin 


Monday 


January 12 


Classes begin 


Friday 


March 5 


Spring vacation begins at 5 p.m. Residence 


Friday 


February 27 


Spring vacation begins at 5 p.m. Residence 






halls close at 7 p.m. 






halls close at 7 p.m. 


Monday 


March 15 


Classes resume at 8 a.m. Residence halls 


Monday 


March 9 


Classes resume at 8 a.m. Residence halls 






open at 1 p.m., Sunday, March 14 






open at 1 p.m., Sunday, March 8 


April 8-23 




Registration for the first semester of 1982-83 


April 6-17 




Registration for the first semester of 1981-82 


Fri.-Sat. 


April 30-May 1 


Reading Days 


Fri.-Sat. 


April 24-25 


Reading Days 


Mon.-Sat. 


May 3-8 


Examinations 


Mon.-Sat. 
Saturday 

Saturday 


April 27-May 2 
May 2 

May 9 


Examinations 

Residence halls close at 7 p.m. for students 

who are not candidates for graduation 

Graduation. Residence halls close at 7 p.m. 


Saturday 
Saturday 


May 8 
May 15 


Residence halls close at 7 p.m. for students 
who are not candidates for graduation 

Graduation. Residence halls close at 7 p.m. 


Summer Session 1981 










Term 


Registration Classes Begin Examinations 










(4-8 P 


m.) 








Three-Wee 


c Monday, 


May 11 Tuesday, May 12 Friday, May 29 








First Four-Week Monday, 


June 1 Tuesday, June 2 Friday, |une 26 








Second Fou 


r-Wcck Monday. 


June 29 Tuesday, June 30 Friday, July 24 









Mary Washington College 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 
703/899-4681 



Mary Washington College 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 
703/899-4681 



/